Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Benjamin Lincoln or search for Benjamin Lincoln in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Board of War and ordnance, (search)
Board of War and ordnance, A committee appointed by Congress, June 12, 1776, consisting of John Adams, Roger Sherman, Benjamin Harrison, James Wilson, and Edward Rutledge, with Richard Peters as secretary. This board continued. with changes, until October, 1781, when Benjamin Lincoln was appointed Secretary of War.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Booth, John Wilkes, (search)
T. Booth: made his appearance as an actor in early manhood. When the Civil War broke out he took sides with the South. Brooding over the lost cause of the Confederacy he formed a conspiracy with Powell, Surratt, and others, to assassinate President Lincoln. O n the evening of April 14, 1865, the President, Mrs. Lincoln, and a party of friends went to Ford's Theatre, in Washington, to witness a performance of Our American cousin. While the play was in progress Booth entered the President's bMrs. Lincoln, and a party of friends went to Ford's Theatre, in Washington, to witness a performance of Our American cousin. While the play was in progress Booth entered the President's box, and shot the President in the back of the head. Then, shouting Sic semper tyrannis! the assassin leaped upon the stage and made his escape on a horse in waiting. He was pursued and overtaken, concealed in a bar n near Bowling Green . Va., and, refusing John Wilkes Booth. to surrender, was shot dead, April 26, 1865. See Lincoln, Abraham.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bound Brook, action at. (search)
Bound Brook, action at. A considerable force under General Lincoln, detached to guard the upper valley of the Raritan River, in New Jersey, was stationed at Bound Brook in April, 1777. It was not far from a British post at New Brunswick. Owing to the negligence of a militia guard, Lincoln came near being surprised by a detachment under Cornwallis. which marched out of New Brunswick (April 13) and fell suddenly upon the Americans. The latter, after a sharp action, escaped with the loss eneral Lincoln, detached to guard the upper valley of the Raritan River, in New Jersey, was stationed at Bound Brook in April, 1777. It was not far from a British post at New Brunswick. Owing to the negligence of a militia guard, Lincoln came near being surprised by a detachment under Cornwallis. which marched out of New Brunswick (April 13) and fell suddenly upon the Americans. The latter, after a sharp action, escaped with the loss of twenty men, two pieces of artillery, and some baggage.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brier Creek, battle of. (search)
Brier Creek, battle of. Colonel Ashe, of North Carolina, was sent by General Lincoln, with 2,000 men, to drive the British from Augusta, Ga., in 1779. The latter fled when Ashe appeared on the opposite side of the river, and pushed towards the sea, led by Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell. Ashe crossed and pursued as far as Brier Creek, 40 miles below Augusta, on the Georgia side of the Savannah River, where he encamped. He was surprised (March 3) and utterly defeated by General Prevost, who Georgia side of the Savannah River, where he encamped. He was surprised (March 3) and utterly defeated by General Prevost, who was marching up from Savannah to support Campbell. Ashe lost almost his entire army by death, captivity, and dispersion. Some were killed, others perished in the morasses, and many were drowned in attempting to pass the Savannah River. This blow deprived Lincoln of about one-fourth of his army and led to the temporary re-establishment of royal authority in Georgia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown, Henry Kirke, 1814-1886 (search)
Brown, Henry Kirke, 1814-1886 Sculptor: born in Leyden, Mass., Feb. 24, 1814: studied portrait-painting in Boston, and after-wards spent several years in Italy, in the study of the plastic art. He settled in Brooklyn, N. Y., and became famous for his bronze statues. A figure by him was the first bronze statue ever made in the United States. Among his best works are an equestrian statue of Washington, in New York: an equestrian statue of General Greene, made for the State of Rhode Island; a colossal statue of De Witt Clinton, and Angel of the resurrection, in Greenwood Cemetery; a colossal equestrian statute of General Scott, and a statue of President Lincoln. He died in Newburg, N. Y., July 10, 1886.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buford, Abraham, 1778-1833 (search)
Buford, Abraham, 1778-1833 Military officer: born in Virginia: became colonel of the 11th Virginia Regiment, May 16, 1778. In May. 1780, when his command, hastening to the relief of Lincoln at Charleston, heard of his surrender, they returned towards North Carolina. Buford's command consisted of nearly 400 Continental infantry, a small detachment of Colonel Washington's cavalry, and two field-pieces. He had reached Camden in safety, and was retreating leisurely towards Charlotte, when Colonel Tarleton, with 700 men, all mounted, sent in pursuit by Cornwallis, overtook Buford upon the Waxhaw Creek. Tarleton had marched 100 miles in fifty-four hours. With only his cavalry — the remainder were mounted infantry — he almost surrounded Buford before that officer was aware of danger, and demanded an instant surrender upon the terms given to the Americans at Charleston. These were too humiliating, and Buford refused compliance. While flags for the conference were passing and repas
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burlingame, Anson, 1820- (search)
n the formation of the Republican party in 1855-56; and he was regarded as one of the ablest debaters in Congress on that side of the House. Severely criticising Preston S. Brooks for his attack upon Charles Sumner (q. v.), the South Carolinian challenged him to fight a duel. He promptly accepted the challenge, proposed rifles as the weapons, and Navy Island, just above Niagara Falls, as the place of conflict. Brooks declined to go there, and the matter was dropped. In March, 1861, President Lincoln appointed Mr. Burlingame minister to Austria. He having spoken in favor of Hungarian independence, the Austrian government refused to receive him, and he was sent as ambassador to China. There he carried forward important negotiations; and when, in 1867, he announced to the Chinese government his intention of returning home, Prince Kung, the regent of the empire, offered to appoint him special ambassador to the United States and the great European powers, for the purpose of framing
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lincoln, Benjamin 1733-1810 (search)
Lincoln, Benjamin 1733-1810 Military officer; born in Hingham, Mass., Jan. 24, 1733; engaged in farming; was a firm and active patriot; and was a major-general of militia when the Revolutionary War broke Benjamin Lincoln. out. In June, 1776, he commanded an expedition that cleared Boston Harbor of British vessels, and in February, 1777, was appointed a major-general in the Continental army. His services were varied and important all through the war, and at the surrender of Yorktown he Benjamin Lincoln. out. In June, 1776, he commanded an expedition that cleared Boston Harbor of British vessels, and in February, 1777, was appointed a major-general in the Continental army. His services were varied and important all through the war, and at the surrender of Yorktown he received the sword of the defeated Cornwallis. From that time (October, 1781) until 1784 he was Secretary of War, and received a vote of thanks from Congress on his retirement. In 1787 he commanded the troops which suppressed Shays's insurrection. In that year he was chosen lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts, and from 1789 to 1808 he was collector of the port of Boston. He was fond of literary and scientific pursuits. He died in Hingham, May 9, 1810.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Presidential elections. (search)
In the tabulation of the votes 1789-1820 only the aggregate electoral votes for candidates for President and Vice-President are given. See popular vote for President. 1789. George Washington, 69; John Adams, of Massachusetts, 34; John Jay, of New York, 9; R. H. Harrison, of Maryland, 6; John Rutledge, of South Carolina, 6; John Hancock, of Massachusetts, 4; George Clinton, of New York, 3; Samuel Huntingdon, of Connecticut, 2; John Milton, of Georgia, 2; James Armstrong, of Georgia; Benjamin Lincoln, of Massachusetts, and Edward Telfair, of Georgia, 1 vote each. Vacancies (votes not cast), 4. George Washington was chosen President and John Adams Vice-President. 1792. George Washington received 132 votes; John Adams, Federalist, 77; George Clinton, of New York, Republican (a), 50; Thomas Jefferson, of Virginia, Republican, 4; Aaron Burr, of New York, Republican, 1 vote. Vacancies, 3. George Washington was chosen President and John Adams Vice-President. 1796. John Adams, Fe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Provincial Congresses (search)
Assembly at Salem, under the provisions of the new and obnoxious act of Parliament. Perceiving the increasing boldness of the people under the stimulus of the proceedings of the Continental Congress, he countermanded the summons. The members denied his right to do so. They met at Salem, ninety in number, on the appointed day, Oct. 5, 1774; waited two days for the governor, who did not appear; and then organized themselves into a Provincial Congress, with John Hancock as president and Benjamin Lincoln, secretary. They adjourned to Concord, where, on the 11th, 260 members took their seats. There they adjourned to Cambridge, when they sent a message to the governor, telling him that, for the want of a legal assembly, they had formed a provisional convention. They complained of unlawful acts of Parliament, expressed their loyalty to the King, and protested against the fortifying of Boston Neck by the governor. Gage denounced them. This act increased their zeal. They appointed a c
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