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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Roger Morris or search for Roger Morris in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morris, Roger 1717- (search)
Morris, Roger 1717- Military officer; born in England, Jan. 28, 1717; entered the royal army as captain in 1745; accompanied Braddock in his unfortunate expedition in 1755; served under Loudoun in 1757, and in 1758 married Mary Phillipse, heiress to the Phillipse Manor, N. Y. He served with distinction under Wolfe, and was with him in the siege of Quebec in 1759. Morris (holding the rank of major) retired from the army in 1764, and took a seat in the executive council of New York late in and in 1758 married Mary Phillipse, heiress to the Phillipse Manor, N. Y. He served with distinction under Wolfe, and was with him in the siege of Quebec in 1759. Morris (holding the rank of major) retired from the army in 1764, and took a seat in the executive council of New York late in that year. Adhering to the British crown, when the Revolution came his property and that of his wife were confiscated, and at the peace he retired, with his family, to England, where he died, Sept. 13, 1794.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York City (search)
ept. 12, 1776, it was resolved to send the military stores to Dobbs Ferry, on the Hudson, and to retreat to and fortify Harlem Heights, on the northern part of Manhattan Island. The sick were taken over to New Jersey. The main body of the army, accompanied by a host of Whigs, left the city (Sept. 14) and moved towards Fort Washington, leaving a rear-guard of 4,000 men, under General Putnam. On the 16th they were on Harlem Heights, and Washington made his headquarters at the house of Col. Roger Morris, his companion-inarms in the battle on the Monongahela. On the 15th the British and Germans crossed the East River at Kip's Bay (foot of Thirty-fourth Street), under cover of a cannonade from their ships. The American guard fled at the first fire, and two brigades that were to support them ran away in a panic. But the British were kept back long enough to allow Putnam, with his rear-guard, to escape along a Beekman's mansion. road near the Hudson River, and gain Harlem Heights. T
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washingtoniana. -1857 (search)
Robinson, and he lingered as long in the company of Miss Phillipse as duty would allow. He wished to take her with him to Virginia as his bride at some time in the near future, but his natural modesty did not allow him to ask the boon of a betrothal. He left the secret with a friend, who kept him informed of everything of importance concerning the rich heiress of Phillipse Manor on Hudson, but delayed to make the proposal of marriage. At length he was informed that he had a rival in Col. Roger Morris, his companion-in-arms under Braddock, who won the fair lady, and the tardy lover married the pretty little Martha Custis three years afterwards. After the capture of Fort Duquesne, Washington took leave of the army at Winchester with the intention of quitting military life. He had been chosen a member of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, and was affianced to the charming widow of Daniel Parke Custis, who was about his own age—twenty-six years. They were wedded at the White Hous
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White Plains, battle of. (search)
armed ships up the Hudson to cut off supplies for the Americans by water from the north and west. Perceiving the gathering of danger, Washington called a council of war at his headquarters on Harlem Heights, which was the deserted mansion of Roger Morris, who married Mary Phillipse The Morris House. (Washington, George). Morris had espoused the cause of the crown, and fled from his mansion with his family. At that council, held Oct. 16, 1776, it was determined to extend the army beyond thMorris had espoused the cause of the crown, and fled from his mansion with his family. At that council, held Oct. 16, 1776, it was determined to extend the army beyond the King's Bridge into Westchester county, abandoning the island, excepting the strong work known as Fort Washington, on the highest point of the island. Arranged in four divisions, under Generals Lee, Heath, Sullivan, and Lincoln, the army concentrated at the village of White Plains, and formed an intrenched camp. The two armies were each about 13,000 strong. On the morning of Oct. 28, after a series of skirmishes, 1,600 men from Delaware and Maryland had taken post on Chatterton's Hill, a lof