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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 149 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 125 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 92 6 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 88 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 83 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 70 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 5 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 51 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 41 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for William Nelson or search for William Nelson in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bankruptcy laws, past and present. (search)
ive acts of bankruptcy, two of them involving fraud on the part of the bankrupt (fraudulent conveyances and voluntary preferences), one constructive fraud, and two which are expressed by the paradox that by them a debtor may go into involuntary bankruptcy voluntarily. The Torrey bill enumerated nine acts of bankruptcy, going further even than the English law and including default for thirty days in the payment of commercial paper, a rule which would have upset our entire credit system. The Nelson bill went to the other extreme and made fraudulent transfers and voluntary preferences while insolvent the only acts of bankruptcy. The law as passed is perhaps a fair compromise, though in extreme cases we may wish for the more complete and farreaching definition of the English statute. But, whatever the effect, lawyers and laymen alike will quickly understand that insolvency has a new meaning. The English statute defines it as inability on the debtor's part to pay from his own moneys
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kentucky, (search)
ng fully 7,000 men to the field; and after that war the State was undisturbed by any stirring events until the breaking out of the Civil War. Its progress was rapid. A second constitution took effect in 1800, and continued in force until the adoption of the present one in 1850. At the beginning of the Civil War Kentucky assumed a position of neutrality, but it was really one of hostility to the Union. The governor refused to comply with the President's requisition for troops; but Lieut. William Nelson, of the navy, a native of the State, and then on ordnance duty at Washington, began to recruit for the National army; and towards the close of July, 1861, he established Camp Dick State seal of Kentucky. Robinson, in Garrard county, for the organization of Kentucky volunteers. These flocked to this camp and to other recruiting stations. A great majority of the people were loyal to the Union, but the governor was not, and the unfortunate position of neutrality which the latter, wi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mahan, Alfred Taylor 1840- (search)
s retired at his own request, Nov. 17, 1896. During the war with Spain he was recalled to active service and made a member of the naval advisory board, and in 1899 President McKinley appointed him a delegate to the peace conference at The Hague. Captain Mahan is known the world over for his publications on naval subjects, and particularly on naval strategy. He was dined by Queen Victoria; honored with the degree of Ll.D. by Cambridge, Oxford, and McGill universities; and had his Influence of sea power in history translated by the German Naval Department and supplied to all the public libraries, schools, and government institutions in the German Empire. Besides a large number of review and magazine articles, he has published The Gulf and inland waters; Influence of sea power upon history; Influence of sea power upon the French Revolution and Empire; Life of Admiral Farragut; Life of Nelson; The interest of the United States in sea power. See Captain Mahan's article on naval ships.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Milligan, case of (search)
ved by the President, and directing that the sentence be carried out without delay. The judges differed on three questions: (1) Whether on the facts submitted a writ of habeas corpus should be issued; (2) Whether Milligan ought to be discharged; (3) Whether the military commission had acted within its jurisdiction; and these were submitted to the Supreme Court of the United States. The first two questions were answered in the affirmative, the third in the negative, Justices Davis, Grier, Nelson, Clifford, and Fields holding that Congress had not the constitutional power to authorize such commission—that the Constitution forbids it, and is the supreme law of the land, in war as in peace. Chief-Justice Chase, supported by Justices Wayne, Swayne, and Miller, held that Congress has the power to authorize military commissions in time of war; but all concurred in the answers given to the three questions submitted, and Milligan was released. The decision of the court overthrew the whole
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nelson, Thomas -1789 (search)
rected the artillery to bombard his own fine stone mansion, standing within the British lines, the supposed headquarters of Cornwallis. After the surrender, General Nelson passed the rest of his days in The Nelson Tombs at Yorktown. retirement, with an impaired constitution. He died in Yorktown, Va., Jan. 4, 1789, so poor that his remaining possessions were sold to pay his debts. The statue of Nelson is one of the six composing a part of the Washington monument at Richmond. The remains of Thomas Nelson were interred in the old family cemetery at Yorktown, where, until 1860, some of the old monuments were well preserved. Among them was that over the grave of the first immigrant of the family (the one nearest in the picture), who was known as Scotch Tom. The second one covers the grave of William Nelson, president of the King's Council in Virginia, and in a vault, near the fragment of a brick wall seen beyond, rested the remains of the signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nelson, William 1847-1772 (search)
Nelson, William 1847-1772 Historian; born in Newark, N. J., Feb. 10, 1847; practised law in New Jersey since 1865; member of many historical and scientific societies Mr. Nelson is the editor of the New Jersey archives, and the author of The Indians of New Jersey; The Doremus family; History of Paterson, N. J., etc Colonial governor; born in Yorktown, Va., in 1711; held a seat in the executive council of which he was later president. He was governor of Virginia during the interval bMr. Nelson is the editor of the New Jersey archives, and the author of The Indians of New Jersey; The Doremus family; History of Paterson, N. J., etc Colonial governor; born in Yorktown, Va., in 1711; held a seat in the executive council of which he was later president. He was governor of Virginia during the interval between the incumbency of Lord Botetourt and Lord Dunmore, and presided over the Supreme Court of Law of the Province. He died in Yorktown, Va., Nov 19, 1772 Military officer; born in Maysville, Ky., in 1825; entered the United States navy in 1840; was at the siege of Vera Cruz in 1847; and afterwards served in the Mediterranean. He was ordered into the military service in Kentucky by the government in 1861, with the rank of brigadier-general of volunteers; was successful in raising troops
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nelson's farm, battle of (search)
Nelson's farm, battle of See Glendale.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Jersey, (search)
arly fifty Waldeckers (Germans) were killed, wounded, or made prisoners at Springfield. General Maxwell surprised Elizabethtown and took nearly 100 prisoners. General Dickinson, with 400 New Jersey militia and fifty Pennsylvania riflemen, crossed Millstone River near Somerset Court-house (June 20, 1777), and attacked a large British foraging party, nine of whom were taken prisoners; the rest escaped, but forty wagons, with much booty, fell into the general's hands. About a month later, Colonel Nelson, of New Brunswick, with a detachment of 150 militiamen, surprised and captured at Lawrence's Neck a major and fifty-nine privates of a Tory corps in the pay of the British. The national Constitution was adopted by unanimous vote in December, 1787, and the State capital was established at Trenton in 1790. The present constitution was ratified Aug. 13, 1844, and has been Seal of the State of New Jersey. amended several times since. During the Civil War New Jersey furnished the Natio
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pikeville, battle near (search)
Pikeville, battle near Gen. William Nelson was in command of about 3,000 loyalists in eastern Kentucky in November, 1861. About 1,000 Confederates, under Col. J. S. Williams, were at Pikeville, the capital of Pike county, Ky. Nelson sent ColonNelson sent Colonel Sill, with Ohio and Kentucky troops, to gain the rear of Williams, while, with the remainder, he should attack his front. A battalion of Kentucky volunteers, under Col. C. A. Marshall, moved in advance of Nelson. On the 9th these were attacked bNelson. On the 9th these were attacked by Confederates in ambush, and a battle ensued, which lasted about an hour and a half, when the Confederates fled, leaving thirty of their number dead on the field. Nelson lost six killed and twenty-four wounded. He did not pursue, as he had no caval, leaving thirty of their number dead on the field. Nelson lost six killed and twenty-four wounded. He did not pursue, as he had no cavalry. Williams fled to the mountains at Pound Gap, carrying with him a large number of cattle and other spoils.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Richmond, battle of. (search)
s region, when he was met by a force organized by Gen. Lew. Wallace, but then commanded by Gen. M. D. Manson. It was part of a force under the direction of Gen. William Nelson. Manson's troops were mostly raw. A collision occurred when approaching Richmond and not far from Rogersville on Aug. 30. A severe battle was fought for three hours, when Manson was driven back. At this junction Nelson arrived and took command. Half an hour later his troops were utterly routed and scattered in all directions. Nelson was wounded. Manson resumed command, but the day was lost. Smith's cavalry had gained the rear of the Nationals, and stood in the way of their wections. Nelson was wounded. Manson resumed command, but the day was lost. Smith's cavalry had gained the rear of the Nationals, and stood in the way of their wild flight. Manson and his men were made prisoners. The estimated loss was about equal, that of the Nationals having been about 5,000 killed, wounded, and prisoners.
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