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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 30 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 11 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for George Popham or search for George Popham in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 8 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Sweden, founding of (search)
and arrived at Jamestown on June 10 of the same year. He probably entered the Delaware on his way to Virginia. The reader will notice various inaccuracies in these early pages. was the first who discovered the bay in which the Indian river Poutaxat debouched, and gave his name, Delaware, to both the river and the bay, in the year 1600. These countries were repeatedly visited by the English: first by those sent out by Sir Walter Raleigh from Bristol, in the year 1603, and afterwards by Sir G. Popham and Captain James Davis, but little more was accomplished than that they learned to know the people, erected some small places and forts, which, however, were soon destroyed by the savages. In the year 1606 a body of emigrants was sent to the northern regions, by two companies, called the London and the Bristol Companies. The former settled southward on the Chesapeake Bay; the latter, on the Kennebeck, or Sagadahoc, River. Each had its territorial rights secured by a patent. In the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Plymouth Company. (search)
land, who had, with scandalous injustice, condemned Raleigh to die on the scaffold), his brother George Popham, Sir Ferdinando Gorges, Sir John and Raleigh Gilbert (sons of Sir Humphrey Gilbert), William Parker, and Thomas Hanham. In 1606 Justice Popham sent a vessel at his own cost, commanded by Henry Challons, to make further discoveries of the north Virginia region. Challons and his crew of In the spring of 1607 they sent three small vessels to the domain with 100 emigrants, and George Popham as governor of the colony. They landed, late in August, at a rather sterile place near the ec. 5, two of the ships returned to England, leaving forty-five persons, with sufficient stores, Popham being president of the colony, and Raleigh Gilbert admiral. During the severe winter their storessel arrived at Fort St. George with supplies, and with the intelligence of the death of Chief-Justice Popham and Sir John Gilbert, two of the most influential members of the company. Discouraged an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Popham, George 1550-1607 (search)
Popham, George 1550-1607 Colonist; born in Somersetshire, England, about 1550; became a patentee of a grant in the present State of Maine; and sailed from Plymouth, England, May 31, 1607, with two ships and 100 men. Popham commanded one of the vessels and Raleigh Gilbert the other. The expedition was a failure. Popham died Popham commanded one of the vessels and Raleigh Gilbert the other. The expedition was a failure. Popham died Feb. 5, 1608. His brother, Sir John, who was lord chief-justice of the king's bench, and an earnest promoter of settlements in America, was born in Somersetshire, England, in 1531; became chief-justice in 1592; and died in June, 1607.ed one of the vessels and Raleigh Gilbert the other. The expedition was a failure. Popham died Feb. 5, 1608. His brother, Sir John, who was lord chief-justice of the king's bench, and an earnest promoter of settlements in America, was born in Somersetshire, England, in 1531; became chief-justice in 1592; and died in June, 1607.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Steuben, Frederick William Augustus, Baron von 1730- (search)
's log-house. commanded in Virginia in 1781, and was distinguished at Yorktown in October. The State of New Jersey gave him a small farm at the close of the war, and the State of New York gave him 16,000 acres of wild land in Oneida county. The national government gave him an annuity of $2,500. He withdrew from society, built a log-house on his domain in New York (afterwards Steubenville), and lived there until his death, Nov. 28, 1794. He gave a tenth of his estate to his aides—North, Popham, and Walker—and his servants, and parcelled the remainder among twenty or thirty tenants. He was generous, witty, cheerful, and of polished manners. Steuben was buried in his garden at Steubenville. Afterwards, agreeably to his desires, his aides had his remains wrapped in his cloak, placed in a plain coffin, and buried in a grave in the town of Steuben, about 7 miles northwest of Trenton Falls. There, in 1826, a monument was erected over his grave by private subscription, the recumbent
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thornton, John Wingate 1818-1878 (search)
Thornton, John Wingate 1818-1878 Historian; born in Saco, Me., Aug. 12, 1818; graduated at the Harvard Law School in 1840; was admitted to the bar and practised in Boston; was one of the originators of the New England Historic-Genealogical Society. His publications include Lives of Isaac Heath and John Bowles, and of Rev. John Eliot, Jr.; The Landing at Cape Anne, or the charter of the first permanent colony on the Territory of the Massachusetts Company, now discovered and first published from the original manuscript; Ancient Pemaquid and historic review; Peter Oliver's Puritan commonwealth reviewed; The pulpit of the American Revolution, or the political sermons of the period of 1776, with an introduction, notes, and illustrations; Colonial schemes of Popham and Gorges; The Historical relation of New England to the English commonwealth, etc. He died in Saco, Me., June 6, 1878.
where above lat. 38°......April 10, 1606 Lord John Popham, chief-justice of England, and Sir Ferdinando Gorges, fit out two ships and 100 emigrants, under George Popham and Raleigh Gilbert, which land at Stage Island......Aug. 11, 1607 Finding Stage Island too small, they establish a colony and Popham's Fort on the west banPopham's Fort on the west bank of the Sagadahoc River......1607 Discouraged by the death of George Popham, and the burning of their storehouse, they return to England in the spring of......1608 Two French Jesuits, Biard and Masse, with several families, settle on Mount Desert Island......1609 Twenty-five French colonists land on Mount Desert Island aGeorge Popham, and the burning of their storehouse, they return to England in the spring of......1608 Two French Jesuits, Biard and Masse, with several families, settle on Mount Desert Island......1609 Twenty-five French colonists land on Mount Desert Island and found a settlement called St. Saviour......March, 1613 [They were soon expelled by the English from Virginia under Captain Argal as trespassers on English territory.] Capt. John Smith arrives at Monhegan from England. Building seven boats, he explores the coast from Penobscot to Cape Cod, and makes a map of it, to which P
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colony of Virginia, (search)
ere were favorable to such undertakings, for there was plenty of material for colonies, such as it was. Soon after the accession of James I., war between England and France ceased, and there were many restless soldiers out of employment—so restless that social order was in danger. There was also a class of ruined and desperate spendthrifts, ready to do anything to retrieve their fortunes. Such were the men who stood ready to go to America when Ferdinando Gorges, Bartholomew Gosnold, Chief-Justice Popham, Richard Hakluyt, Capt. John Smith, and others devised a new scheme for settling Virginia. The timid King, glad to perceive a new field open for the restless spirits of his realm, granted a liberal patent to a company of noblemen, gentlemen, and merchants, chiefly of London, to plant settlements in America, between lat. 34° and 38° N., and westward 100 miles from the sea. A similar charter was granted to another company to settle between lat. 41° and 45° N. The space of about 200 <
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Weymouth, George 1605- (search)
he bays and rivers of Maine, and saw (possibly) the White Mountains of New Hampshire. There was mutual distrust between Weymouth and the Indians, and the former decided to keep no faith with the latter. Five of the Indians who ventured on hoard the vessel were carried off to England, three of whom were given to Sir Ferdinando Gorges, at Plymouth; the other two were sent to Sir John Popham, of London. The curiosity excited by these Indians in London doubtless gave the idea expressed by Shakespeare in The tempest, in which Trinculo says of the London people: Any strange beast there makes a man: when they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian. Weymouth's kidnapping spread distrust and anger wide among the Indians on the Eastern coast. One of the Indians carried away came, in May, 1607, as guide and interpreter for a colony of 120 persons, sent out in two vessels, commanded by George Popham, to plant a colony in Eastern New England.