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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Samuel Davis Sturgis or search for Samuel Davis Sturgis in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Antietam, battle of. (search)
osed to a raking fire from the Confederate batteries and an enfilading fire from sharp-shooters, was several times repulsed. Finally, at a little past noon, two regiments charged across the bridge and drove its defenders away. The divisions of Sturgis, Wilcox, and Rodman, and Scammon's brigade, with four batteries, passed the bridge and drove the confederates almost to Sharpsburg. A. P. Hill, with fresh troops, fell upon Burnside's left, mortally wounding General Rodman, and driving the Nationals nearly back to the bridge. Gen. O'B. Branch, of North Carolina, was also killed in this encounter. The Confederates were checked by National artillery on the eastern side of the stream, and, reserves advancing under Sturgis, there was no further attempt to retake the Burnside Bridge, as it was called. Hill came up just in time to save Lee's army from destruction. Darkness ended the memorable struggle known as the Battle of Antietam. The losses were very severe. McClellan reported
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forrest, Nathan Bedford 1821-1877 (search)
n, under Colonel Hicks, had taken refuge. It was refused; and, after assailing the works furiously, and plundering and burning the town until midnight, he ceased the assault. Hearing of reinforcements for Hicks approaching, he retreated (March 27), with a loss of 300 men killed and wounded. The National loss was sixty killed and wounded. Forrest was chagrined by this failure, and proceeded to attack Fort Pillow, on the Mississippi, which he captured in April. Hearing of the march of General Sturgis from Memphis to intercept him, Forrest escaped from Tennessee into Mississippi. A few weeks later, troops sent out from Memphis to hunt up and capture him were defeated by him in a severe engagement at Gun Town (June 10), on the Mobile and Ohio Railway, and were driven back with great loss. On the 14th he was defeated near Tupelo, Miss. Not long afterwards, when Smith was in Mississippi with 10,000 men, the bold raider flanked him, and dashed into Memphis in broad daylight, at the he
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fredericksburg, battle at. (search)
eavily, while missiles from the Confederate cannon made great lanes through their ranks. After a brief struggle, French was thrown back, shattered and broken, nearly one-half of his command disabled. Hancock advanced, and his brigades fought most vigorously. In fifteen minutes, Hancock, also, was driven back. Of 5,000 veterans whom he led into action, 2,013 had fallen, and yet the struggle was maintained. Howard's division came to the aid of French and Hancock; so, also, did those of Sturgis and Getty. Finally, Hooker crossed the river with three divisions. He was so satisfied with the hopelessness of any further attacks upon the strong position of the Confederates, that he begged Burnside to desist. He would not yield. Hooker sent 4,000 men in the track of French, Hancock, and Howard, to attack with bayonets only. These were hurled back by terrific volleys of rifleballs, leaving 1,700 of their number prostrate on the field. Night soon closed the awful conflict, when the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morgan, John Hunt 1826- (search)
ion at Richmond as a great hero. When Longstreet left Knoxville, Tenn., late in 1863, he lingered awhile between there and the Virginia border. He had been pursued by cavalry, and near Bean's Station he had a sharp skirmish (Dec. 14), when the Nationals were pushed back with a loss of 200 men; Longstreet's loss was greater. Longstreet finally retired to Virginia, leaving Morgan in eastern Tennessee. Gen. John G. Foster was there, in command of the Army of the Ohio; and on Dec. 29 Gen. S. D. Sturgis, with the National advance at Knoxville, between Mossy Creek and New Market, met and fought Morgan and Armstrong, who led about 6,000 Confederates. The latter were defeated. On Jan. 16, 1864, Sturgis was attacked by Morgan and Armstrong at Dandridge, the capital of Jefferson county. After a severe encounter, Sturgis fell back to Strawberry Plains, where his soldiers suffered intensely from the extreme cold. Morgan lingered in eastern Tennessee until May, and late in that month, wit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sturgis, Samuel Davis 1822-1889 (search)
Sturgis, Samuel Davis 1822-1889 Military officer; born in Shippensburg, Pa., June 11, 1822; graduated at West Point in 1846, entering the dragoons. His first service was in the war with Mexico, in which he was active. Before the battle of Buena Vista he was made prisoner, but was soon exchanged. For his energy in warfare we was commissioned a brigadiergeneral of volunteers in August, 1861, and was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general, United States army, in March, Samuel Davis Sturgis. 1865. At the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg, General Sturgis was in command of a division. He was retired in 1886. He died in neral of volunteers in August, 1861, and was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general, United States army, in March, Samuel Davis Sturgis. 1865. At the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg, General Sturgis was in command of a division. He was retired in 1886. He died in St. Paul. Minn., Sept. 28, 1889.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mississippi, (search)
cPherson, May 12; McPherson occupies Jackson, May 14; Grant defeats Pemberton at Champion Hills, May 16, and at Big Black River, May 17; Vicksburg invested by forces under General Grant, May 18; Vicksburg surrendered, July 4; Jackson evacuated by General Johnston, who had occupied it after the advance of the Federals on Vicksburg, and the city is occupied by General Sherman......July 16, 1863 Sherman's Meridan expedition leaves Vicksburg......Feb. 3, 1864 Forrest, Confederate, defeats Sturgis at Guntown......June 10, 1864 Upon the surrender of General Taylor to General Canby, Governor Clarke by proclamation recalls the State officers, with the archives, to Jackson, and convenes the legislature. He recommends a convention to repeal the ordinance of secession and remodel constitution......May 6, 1865 Judge William L. Sharkey appointed provisional governor by President Johnson, the federal government not recognizing Governor Clarke and the legislature......June 13, 1865
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilson's Creek, battle of. (search)
t an early hour. Lyon's column bore the brunt. Wherever the storm raged fiercest, there he appeared, encouraging his troops by words and deeds. First his horse was shot under him; then he received a wound in his leg, and another in his head, which partially stunned him. Swinging his sword over his head and ordering his men to follow, he dashed forward, but soon fell by a rifleball that passed through his body near his heart. On the death of Lyon, the command of his column devolved on Major Sturgis. Certain defeat seemed to await the little band. Sigel had attacked their rear with his six cannon and was at first successful, driving the Confederates out of their camp. He was suddenly defeated by a trick. Arrayed like National soldiers, a heavy force of Confederates approached Sigel's line. Deceived, he greeted them in a friendly way, when suddenly they displayed a Confederate flag and attacked the Nationals in the most furious manner, capturing Sigel's battery and scattering al