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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 3 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for John Tanner or search for John Tanner in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), James, Edwin 1797-1861 (search)
James, Edwin 1797-1861 Geologist; born in Weybridge, Vt., Aug. 27, 1797; graduated at Middlebury College in 1816; and afterwards studied medicine, botany, and geology in Boston. He is the author of a Report of the expedition to the Rocky Mountains, 1818-19; Narrative of John Tanner, etc. He died in Burlington, Ia., Oct. 28, 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tanner, John 1780-1847 (search)
Tanner, John 1780-1847 Captive; born in Kentucky about 1780. His father laid out a farm at the mouth of the Big Miami River, O. When John was six years old he was captured by an Indian, and after two years detention was sold to Net-nokwa, an Ottawa Indian. He lived in captivity for thirty years, becoming so thoroughly accustomed to Indian life that he forgot his own language. He engaged in warlike expeditions and married Miskwa-bun-o-kwa ( the Red Sky of the Morning ). Subsequently he wea Indian. He lived in captivity for thirty years, becoming so thoroughly accustomed to Indian life that he forgot his own language. He engaged in warlike expeditions and married Miskwa-bun-o-kwa ( the Red Sky of the Morning ). Subsequently he went to Detroit, where he met his brother and visited his family. He was then employed as an interpreter. He was the author of a Narrative of the captivity and adventures of John Tanner during thirty years residence among the Indians. He died in 1847.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tyler, John 1790-1862 (search)
ry covered at present by pine forests of great value, and much of it capable hereafter of agricultural improvement, is not a matter upon which the opinion of intelligent men is likely to be divided. So far as New Hampshire is concerned, the treaty secures all that she requires, and New York and Vermont are quieted to the extent of their claim and occupation. The difference which would be made in the northern boundary of these two States by correcting the parallel of latitude may be seen on Tanner's maps (1836), new atlas, maps Nos. 6 and 9. From the intersection of the forty-fifth degree of north latitude with the St. Lawrence and along that river and the lakes to the water communication between Lake Huron and Lake Superior the line was definitely agreed on by the commissioners of the two governments under the sixth article of the treaty of Ghent; but between this last-mentioned point and the Lake of the Woods the commissioners, acting under the seventh article of that treaty, fou