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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 66 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 48 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 42 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 30 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 16 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Bayard Taylor or search for Bayard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Taylor, Bayard 1825- (search)
Taylor, Bayard 1825- Traveller; born in Kennet Square, Pa., Jan. 11, 1825; became a printer's apprentice at seventeen years of age, and at about the same time wrote verses with much facility. His rhymes were collected and published in a volume in 1844, entitled Ximena. In 1844– 46 he made a tour on foot in Europe, of which he published (1846) an account in Views afoot. In 1847 he went to New York and wrote for the Literary world and for the Tribune, and in 1848 published Rhymes of trav In 1847 he went to New York and wrote for the Literary world and for the Tribune, and in 1848 published Rhymes of travel. In 1849 he Bayard Taylor. became owner of a share in the Tribune, and was one of the shareholders at the time of his death. After serving two months as the secretary of the American legation at Shanghai, he joined the expedition of Commodore Perry to Japan. In the spring of 1878 he went to Berlin as American minister at the German court, and died there, Dec. 19, 187
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
n, Sept. 20, and present their credentials......Sept. 28, 1878 Proclamation of President warning all persons to desist from violence in New Mexico......Oct. 7, 1878 Remains of Alexander T. Stewart mysteriously stolen from the vault in St. Mark's churchyard, New York......Nov. 7, 1878 Third session meets, and President Hayes's second annual message received......Dec. 2, 1878 Gold reaches par in Wall Street, New York, for the first time since Jan. 13, 1862......Dec. 17, 1878 Bayard Taylor, born 1825, dies at Berlin, Germany......Dec. 19, 1878 Government resumes specie payment......Jan. 1, 1879 Caleb Cushing, born 1800, dies at Newburyport, Mass......Jan. 2, 1879 Potter committee of House of Representatives begins the cipher despatches inquiry at Washington......Jan. 21, 1879 Act to incorporate the Society of the Jesuit Fathers of New Mexico, passed by the legislative Assembly of New Mexico over the governor's veto, Jan. 18, is dedared void by act approved.....
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
Seminoles attack Fort Mellon, on Lake Monroe, and retire......Feb. 9, 1837 Indians assembled in large numbers at Fort Dade, by articles of capitulation agree to withdraw south of the Hillsboro River, and prepare at once to emigrate to the West......March 6, 1837 General Hernandez captures two camps of Indians and negroes......Sept. 10, 1837 General Hernandez, by order of General Jesup, captures Osceola and sends him to Fort Moultrie, S. C., as a prisoner......Oct. 21, 1837 General Taylor routs a large Indian force at Okeechobee Lake......Dec. 25, 1837 Battle at Wacassassa River......Dec. 26, 1837 Action with Seminoles at Jupiter Inlet; General Jesup wounded......Jan. 24, 1838 General Jesup offering peace, many Indians come into camp, agreeing to let the President decide whether they remain in the country or not......February, 1838 President determining to enforce the treaties, General Jesup captures about 700 Indians and negroes......March 22, 1838 Over 1,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whittier, John Greenleaf 1807-1892 (search)
the clearness and directness of his spiritual insight. Elizur Wright, the young professor of a Western college, who had lost his place by his bold advocacy of freedom, with a look of sharp concentration in keeping with an intellect keen as a Damascus blade, closely watched the proceedings through his spectacles, opening his mouth only to speak directly to the purpose. The portly form of Dr. Bartholomew Fussell, the beloved physician, from that beautiful land of plenty and peace which Bayard Taylor has described in his Story of Kennett, was not to be overlooked. Abolitionist in heart and soul, his house was known as the shelter of runaway slaves; and no sportsman ever entered into the chase with such zest as he did into the arduous and sometimes dangerous work of aiding their escape and baffling their pursuers. The youngest man present was, I believe, James Miller McKim, a Presbyterian minister from Columbia, afterwards one of our most efficient workers. James Mott, E. L. Capron
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilson, James Harrison (search)
est was driven by his pursuers 24 miles, when the chase ended. 19 miles from Selma. The latter place had been strongly fortified. The race was hot, and Forrest won it, Wilson closely pursuing. The latter came in sight of the city 0 late in the afternoon and immediately assaulted its defences, carrying them without much difficulty. Although Forrest was in it with 7,000 troops, it was in possession of the Nationals before sunset. Forrest was not disposed to attempt its defence, but General Taylor, who was there, ordered him to hold it at all hazards. He did his best, but in the evening he and one-half his followers fled eastward, leaving in flames 25,000 bales of cotton stored in the city. Wilson destroyed the great foundries and other public property, and left Selma (April 10) a ghastly ruin. From Selma Wilson pushed to Montgomery, then under the military command of Gen. Wirt Adams. This officer did not wait for Wilson's arrival, but, setting on fire 90,000 bales of cotton s