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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 50 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 57 results in 31 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anderson, Robert, -1871 (search)
ey (q. v.) In 1857 he was commissioned major of artillery, and in October, 1860, Secretary Floyd removed Colonel Gardiner from the command of the defences of Charleston Harbor, because he attempted to increase his supply of ammunition. and Major Anderson was appointed to succeed him. He arrived there on the 20th, and was satisfied communicated his suspicions to Adjutant-General Cooper. In that letter Anderson announced Robert Anderson. to the government the weakness of the forts in Charleston Harbor, and urged the necessity of immediately strengthening them. He told the Secretary of War that Fort Moultrie, his Headquarters, was so weak as to invite atta became more frequent and alarming. He knew that the convention had appointed commissioners to repair to Washington and demand the surrender of the forts in Charleston Harbor, and he was conscious that the latter were liable to be attacked at any moment. He knew, too, that if he should remain in Fort Moultrie, their efforts would
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
b. 27, 1776 Boston (Evacuation of)Mar. 17, 1776 Cedar RapidsMay 9, 1776 Three RiversJune 8, 1776 Fort Sullivan (Charleston Harbor)June 28, 1776 Long IslandAug. 27, 1776 Harlem PlainsSept. 16, 1776 White PlainsOct. 28, 1776 Fort WashingtonNoviege of)Sept. and Oct. 1781 naval engagements. Hampton, Va. (British fleet repulsed)Oct. 24, 1775 Fort Sullivan, Charleston Harbor (British fleet repulsed)June 28, 1776 Fort Stony Point, on the Hudson (captured by British fleet)May 31, 1779 Verb. 27, 1776 Boston (Evacuation of)Mar. 17, 1776 Cedar RapidsMay 9, 1776 Three RiversJune 8, 1776 Fort Sullivan (Charleston Harbor)June 28, 1776 Long IslandAug. 27, 1776 Harlem PlainsSept. 16, 1776 White PlainsOct. 28, 1776 Fort WashingtonNoviege of)Sept. and Oct. 1781 naval engagements. Hampton, Va. (British fleet repulsed)Oct. 24, 1775 Fort Sullivan, Charleston Harbor (British fleet repulsed)June 28, 1776 Fort Stony Point, on the Hudson (captured by British fleet)May 31, 1779 Ve
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buchanan, James, (search)
r section of the country. If the political conflict were to end in a civil war, it was my determined purpose not to commence it nor even to furnish an excuse for it by any act of this government. My opinion remains unchanged that justice as well as sound policy requires us still to seek a peaceful solution of the questions at issue between the North and the South. Entertaining this conviction, I refrained even from sending reinforcements to Major Anderson, who commanded the forts in Charleston Harbor, until an absolute necessity for doing so should make itself apparent, lest it might unjustly be regarded as a menace of military coercion, and thus furnish, if not a provocation, at least a pretext, for an outbreak on the part of South Carolina. No necessity for these reinforcements seemed to exist. I was assured by distinguished and upright gentlemen of South Carolina that no attack upon Major Anderson was intended, but that, on the contrary, it was the desire of the State authori
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Campbell, William, Lord (search)
ceived with courtesy; and soon summoned a meeting of the Assembly. They came, declined to do business, and adjourned on their own authority. The Committee of Safety proceeded in their preparations for resistance without regard to the presence of the governor. Lord Campbell professed great love for the people. His sincerity was suspected, and the hollowness of his professions was soon proved. Early in September Colonel Moultrie, by order of the Committee of Safety, proceeded to take possession of a small post on Sullivan's Island, in Charleston Harbor. The small garrison fled to the British sloops-of-war Tamar and Cherokee, lying near. Lord Campbell, seeing the storm of popular indignation against him daily increasing, particularly after it was discovered that he had attempted to incite the Indians to make war for the King, and had tampered with the Tories of the interior of the province, also fled to one of these vessels for shelter, and never returned. He died Sept. 5, 1778.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Charleston, S. C. (search)
terwards sailed into the harbor with troops, and was captured. The victory was complete, and the Spaniards became circumspect. In the Revolutionary War. In the spring of 1776 a considerable fleet, under Admiral Sir Peter Parker, sailed from England with troops, under Earl Cornwallis, to operate against the coasts of the Southern provinces. This armament joined that of Sir Henry Clinton at Cape Fear. After some marauding operations in that region, the united forces proceeded to Charleston Harbor, to make a combined attack by land and water upon Fort Sullivan, on Sullivan's Island, and then to seize the city and province. The Southern. patriots had cheerfully responded to the call of Governor Rutledge to come to the defence of Charleston, and about 6,000 armed men were in the vicinity when the enemy appeared. The city and eligible points near had been fortified. Fort Sullivan was composed of palmetto logs and earth, armed with twenty-six cannon, and garrisoned by about 500
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
tates. This great struggle was actually begun when, after the attack on Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, in April, 1861, President Lincoln, recognizing the fact that a part of the people in the e armies came in contact. The first overt act of war was committed by the Confederates in Charleston Harbor at the beginning of 1861 (see Star of the West). The last struggle of the war occurred in ited States House of Representatives, by a vote, commended the course of Major Anderson in Charleston Harbor.—12. The five representatives of Mississippi withdrew from Congress.—14. The Ohio legisl—30. Union gunboat Isaac Smith captured in Stono River. S. C.—31. Blockading squadron off Charleston Harbor attacked by Confederate iron-clad gunboats, and the harbor proclaimed opened by Beauregard relief of conscripts.— Sept. 4. Bread-riot at Mobile, Ala.—11. One-half of James Island, Charleston Harbor, captured by National troops.—13. Brilliant cavalry engagement at Culpeper Court-H
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cockburn, Sir George 1772-1853 (search)
ed the royal navy in 1783, and was rear-admiral in 1812. During the spring and summer of 1813 a most distressing warfare was carried on upon land and water by a British squadron, under his command, along the coasts between Delaware Bay and Charleston Harbor. It was marked by many acts of cruelty. Chastise the Americans into submission was the substance of the order given to Cockburn by the British cabinet, and he seemed to be a willing servant of the will of his government. An Order in Counof militia was gathered at Point Pleasant. In anticipation of the coming of an army of liberation. as they were falsely informed Cockburn's men were, the negroes were prepared to rise and strike for freedom. Cockburn did not venture into Charleston Harbor, but went down to Hilton Head, from which he carried off slaves and cattle. Then he visited the Georgia coast, and at Dungenness House, the fine estate of Gen. Nathaniel Greene, on Cumberland Island, he made his headquarters for the winter
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fairfax, Donald McNeill 1822-1894 (search)
Fairfax, Donald McNeill 1822-1894 Naval officer; born in Virginia, Aug. 10, 1822; joined the navy in 1837; and served with the Pacific fleet during the war with Mexico. In 1862-63 he was with Farragut; was then given command successively of the Nantucket and the Montauk, with which he took part in a number of attacks upon the defences of Charleston Harbor; and in 1864-65 was superintendent of the Naval Academy. He was promoted rear-admiral in July, 1880; retired in 1881. He died in Hagerstown, Md., Jan. 11, 1894.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Flag, National. (search)
Flag, National. Every colony had its peculiar ensign, and the army and navy of the united colonies, at first, displayed various flags, some colonial, others regimental, and others, like the flag at Fort Sullivan, Charleston Harbor, a blue field with a silver crescent, for special occasions. The American flag used at the battle on Bunker (Breed's) Hill, was called the New England flag. It was a blue ground, with the red cross of St. George in a corner, quartering a white field, and in the upper dexter quartering was the figure of a pine-tree. The New Englanders had also a pine-tree flag as well as a pine-tree shilling. The engraving below is a reduced copy of a vignette on a map of Boston, published in Paris in 1776. The London Chronicle, an anti-ministerial paper, in its issue for January, 1776, gives the following description of the flag of an American cruiser that had been captured: In the The New England flag. Admiralty Office is the flag of a provincial privateer. Th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Floating batteries. (search)
k plank and cork-wood; carries forty-four guns, four of which are 100-pounders; can Gregg's iron-clad vessel in 1814. discharge 100 gallons of boiling water in a few minutes, and by mechanism brandishes 300 cutlasses with the utmost regularity over her gunwales; works, also, an equal number of pikes of great length, darting them from her sides with prodigious force, and withdrawing them every quarter of a minute. The Confederates of South Carolina constructed a floating battery in Charleston harbor in the winter of 1861. It was a curious monster, made of heavy pine timber, filled in with palmetto-logs, and covered with a double layer of railroad iron. It appeared like an immense shed, 25 feet in width, and, with its appendage, about 100 feet in length. It mounted in its front (which sloped inwards from its iron-clad roof) four enormous siege-guns. The powder magazine was in the rear, below the water-line, and at its extremity was a platform covered with sand-bags, to protect
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