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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 570 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 40 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 36 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Michigan (Michigan, United States) or search for Michigan (Michigan, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 285 results in 173 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbe, Cleveland, 1838- (search)
Abbe, Cleveland, 1838- Meteorologist; born in New York, Dec. 3, 1838. He was graduated at the College of the City of New York in 1857; studied astronomy with Brunnow at Ann Arbor. Mich., and with Gould at Cambridge, Mass.; and, after serving four years in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. spent two years in study at the Nicholas Central Observatory at Pulkowa, Russia. In 1868 he became director of the Cincinnati Observatory, and while there began making daily weather reports to the local Chamber of Commerce. The value of this work induced the United States government to establish a similar bureau. He was appointed meteorologist to the United States signal service (q. v.) in 1871, and in 1879 became meteorologist to the United States weather Bureau (q. v.). In addition to his duties in this field, he also became editor of the Monthly weather review, Professor of Meteorology in Columbian University, Washington D. C., and Lecturer on Meteorology in Johns Hopkins Uni
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolition. (search)
not yet admitted to the Union, formed a State constitution abolishing slavery. Like constitutions were adopted by Massachusetts, including Maine, in 1780, and by New Hampshire in 1783. Gradual abolition was secured by statute in Pennsylvania in 1780, in Rhode Island and Connecticut in 1784, in New York in 1799, and in New Jersey in 1804. Abolition of slavery in the Northwest Territory, north of the Ohio and east of the Mississippi, including the present States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and part of Minnesota, was secured by the Ordinance of 1787. In 1807, Congress passed an act for the abolition of the slave-trade on Jan. 1, 1808. Slavery in part of the Louisiana Purchase, including the present States of Iowa, Oregon, Kansas, Nebraska, part of Colorado, and part of Minnesota, was abolished by the Missouri compromise (q. v..), whose validity was rejected by the Supreme Court (see Dred Scott decision); but the provision for abolition was embodied in the constit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Acquisition of Territory. (search)
Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The boundaries of many of these States, as constituted by their charters, extended to the Pacific Ocean; but in practice they ceased at the Mississippi. Beyond that river the territory belonged, by discovery and settlement, to the-King of Spain. All the territory west of the present boundaries of the States was ceded by them to the United States in the order named: Virginia, 1784: Massachusetts, 1785; Connecticut, 1786 and 1800; South Carolina, 1787; North Carolina, 1790: Georgia, 1802. This ceded territory comprised part of Minnesota, all of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio (see Northwest Territory), Tennessee, and a great part of Alabama and Mississippi. Vermont was admitted as a separate State in 1791; Kentucky, then a part of Virginia, in 1792; and Maine, till that time claimed by Massachusetts, in 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Kendall, 1835- (search)
Adams, Charles Kendall, 1835- Educator and historian; born in Derby, Vt., Jan. 24, 1835; was graduated at the University of Michigan. and continued his studies in Germany, France, and Italy. In 1867-85 he was Professor of History in the University of Michigan; in 1885-92 was president of Cornell University; in 1892 became president of the University of Wisconsin; and from that year till 1895 was editor-in-chief of the revised edition of Johnson's Universal Cyclopaedia. He has published mmany, France, and Italy. In 1867-85 he was Professor of History in the University of Michigan; in 1885-92 was president of Cornell University; in 1892 became president of the University of Wisconsin; and from that year till 1895 was editor-in-chief of the revised edition of Johnson's Universal Cyclopaedia. He has published many monographs and papers in reviews, and Democracy and monarchy in France; Manual of Historical Literature; British orations; Christopher Columbus, his life and work, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Henry C. (search)
Adams, Henry C. Born in Davenport, Ia., 1861. Graduated from Iowa College, 1874. Professor of Political Economy in the University of Michigan since 1887. Director of the division of transportation of the eleventh census; statistician to Interstate Commerce Commission since 1887; president American Economic Association from 1895-97. He has written Lectures on political Economy ; State in relation to industrial action; Public debts; The Science of finance.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alger, Russell Alexander, 1836- (search)
Alger, Russell Alexander, 1836- Secretary of War: born in Lafayette, O., Feb. 27, 1836; worked on a farm for years earning Russell A. Alger. money to defray the expenses of his education. He was admitted to the bar in 1859, but was forced by ill health to give up practice. When the Civil War broke out he entered the Union army as a captain, and rose to brevet brigadier-general of volunteers. After the war he entered the lumber business, in which he acquired a large fortune. He was governor of Michigan in 1885-87; was a candidate for the Republican Presidential nomination in 1888; was commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1889-90; and became Secretary of War under President McKinley in 1897. During almost all of the American-Spanish War in 1898 he was subjected to much public censure on account of alleged shortcomings in the various bureaus of the War Department. He resigned his office in 1899, and wrote a history of the war with Spain.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), American protective Association, (search)
lusively. The year 1893, however, showed such remarkable success for the order in the political field that the conditions changed and the ambitions politician suddenly awoke to the realization that baptism in A. P. A. water was attended with pleasant and profitable political consequences. In the two years that followed the order planted itself firmly in every State and Territory in the Union, and was instrumental in overturning the entire political machinery in New York, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, and Iowa, and of California, Minnesota, Pennsylvania. Wisconsin, Washington, and Oregon, in part. With these victories commenced a general policy of active aggression, and the negative tactics of the organization were practically abandoned. The opening of the Fifty-fourth Congress demonstrated the power of the organization in the political field as no event had previously done. Nearly one hundred members of the House of Representatives were elected t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Herman Vandenburg, 1865- (search)
Ames, Herman Vandenburg, 1865- Historian; born in Lancaster, Mass., Aug. 7, 1865; was graduated at Amherst College in 1888 and later studied in Germany. In 1891-94 he was an instructor in History at the University of Michigan; in 1896-97 occupied a similar post in Ohio State University; and in the latter year accepted the chair of American Constitutional History in the University of Pennsylvania. He is author of The proposed amendments to the Constitution of the United States, for which he was awarded the prize of the American Historical Association in 1897.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Angell, James Burrill, 1829- (search)
Angell, James Burrill, 1829- Educator and diplomatist; born in Scituate, R. I., Jan. 7, 1829; was graduated at Brown University; in 1849; Professor of Modern Languages and Literature at Brown University in 1853-60; president of the University of Vermont in 1866-71; and since 1871 president of the University of Michigan. In 1880-81 he was United States minister to China; in 1887 a member of the Anglo-American Commission on Canadian Fisheries: in 1896 chairman of the Canadian-American Commission on Deep Waterways from the Great Lakes to the Sea: and in 1897-98 United States minister to Turkey. He is author of numerous addresses, and magazine articles.
arters, St. Paul, Minn. Commander, Brig.-Gen. James F. Wade. Department of the East.--New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and District of Porto Rico, embracing Porto Rico and adjacent islands; headquarters, Governor's Island, N. Y. Commander, Maj.-Gen. John R. Brooke. Department of the Lakes.--States of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee; headquarters, Chicago, Ill. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Elwell S. Otis. Department of the Missouri.--States of Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Arkansas, the Indian Territory, and the Territory of Oklahoma; headquarters, Omaha, Neb. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. Department of Texas.--State of Texas; headquarters, San Antonio. Tex. Commander, Col. Chambers McKibbin, 12th Infantry. An act of Congress of June 6, 1900, re-organize
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