Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Biloxi (Mississippi, United States) or search for Biloxi (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 8 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bienville, Jean Baptiste le moyne, 1680-1701 (search)
Bienville, Jean Baptiste le moyne, 1680-1701 Pioneer; brother of Le Moyne Iberville, who founded a French settlement at Biloxi, near the mouth of the Mississippi, in 1698; born in Montreal, Feb. 23, 1680. For several years he was in the French naval service with Iberville, and accompanied him with his brother Sauville to Louisiana. In 1699 Bienville explored the country around Biloxi. Sauville was appointed governor of Louisiana in 1699, and the next year Bienville constructed a fort 54 Biloxi. Sauville was appointed governor of Louisiana in 1699, and the next year Bienville constructed a fort 54 miles above the mouth of the river. Sauville died in 1701, when Bienville took charge of the colony, transferring the seat of government to Mobile. In 1704 he was joined by his brother Chateaugay, who brought seventeen settlers from France. Soon afterwards a ship brought twenty young women as wives for settlers at Mobile. Iberville soon afterwards died, and Bienville, charged with misconduct, was dismissed from office in 1707. His successor dying on his way from( France, bienville retained
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Le Moine, Sauvolle 1671-1701 (search)
Le Moine, Sauvolle 1671-1701 Royal governor; born in Montreal in 1671; accompanied the brothers Iberville and Bienville in their expedition to the mouth of the Mississippi River, and was appointed the first governor of Louisiana in 1699. He was of feeble constitution; possessed brilliant talents, a remarkably fine personal appearance, and a large fortune. Racine pronounced him a poet; Bossuet predicted that he would become a great orator; and Villars called him a marshal in embryo. These promises were unfulfilled. He died in Biloxi, Miss., July 22, 1701.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
t of $10,877,800, a floating debt of $913,597, and an unrecognized debt of $3,953,000. The population in 1890 was 1,118,587; in 1900, 1,381,625. In October, 1698, King William sent three ships to take possession of the Mississippi River, and prepare for planting a colony of French Protestants on its borders. Nothing came of it. In the same month Iberville and others sailed for the same river, and planted the seeds of French dominion there. The first settlement in Louisiana was made at Biloxi (now in Mississippi) in 1699. In 1702 there were settlements begun on Dauphin Island and at Mobile, now in Alabama. The French government, wishing to promote more rapid settlements in that region, granted (1712) the whole province, with a monopoly of trade, to Anthony Crozat, a wealthy French merchant, who expected large profits from mines and trade with Mexico. Crozat contracted to send ships from France, with goods and emigrants, every year; and he was entitled to import a cargo of negr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Orleans. (search)
sippi in 1718, and sent a party of convicts to clear up a swamp on the site of the present city of New Orleans. When Charlevoix visited the spot in 1722, the germ of the city consisted of a large wooden warehouse, a shed for a church, two or three ordinary houses, and a quantity of huts built without order. But Bienville believed that it would one day become, perhaps, too, at no distant day, an opulent city, the metropolis of a great and rich colony, and removed the seat of government from Biloxi to New Orleans. Law's settlers in Arkansas (see law, John), finding themselves abandoned, went down to New Orleans and received allotments on both sides of the river, settled on cottage farms, and raised vegetables for the supply of the town and soldiers. Thus the rich tract near New Orleans became known as the German coast. After Spain had acquired possession of Louisiana by treaty with France (1763), the Spanish cabinet determined that Louisiana must be retained as a part of the Spani
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nivelles, Charles ÉTienne de 1665- (search)
Nivelles, Charles ÉTienne de 1665- Military officer; born in Dauphine, France, about 1665; served for several years in Canada; and then went to Louisiana. In 1699 he was one of the founders of Biloxi, the first French colony in Louisiana; in 1705 when yellow fever occurred there he kept the colonists from dispersing. Later when the women rebelled against the diet of Indian corn he aided in putting down the rebellion, which was dubbed the petticoat insurrection. He was drowned in the great flood of 1711.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Strong, George Crockett 1832- (search)
Strong, George Crockett 1832- Military officer; born in Stockbridge, Vt., Oct. 16, 1832; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1857; given command of the Watervliet arsenal in May, 1861; led an expedition from Ship Island to Biloxi, Miss., in April, 1862; and another to Ponchatoula in September; promoted brigadier-general of volunteers in November, 1862. While leading a column against Fort Wagner, July 18, 1863, he was fatally wounded; was removed to New York City, where he died, July 30. He was the author of Cadet life at West Point.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
118,587; 1900, 1,381,625. Capital, Baton Rouge. It differs from the other States in that its jurisprudence is based on the Roman or civil law instead of the common law of England, and the counties are called parishes. Robert Cavalier de la Salle descends the Mississippi to its mouth, names the country Louisiana, and takes possession in the name of the King of France......April 9, 1682 Pierre Le Moyne d'iberville enters the Mississippi......March 2, 1699 D'Iberville, having settled Biloxi, sails for France, leaving his lieutenant, Sauvolle de la Villantry, in command......May 3, 1699 Jean Baptist Le Moyne Bienville (born in Montreal, Feb. 23, 1680), brother of D'Iberville, returning from an expedition north of Lake Pontchartrain, finds an English ship at the mouth of the Mississippi, which sails away after being notified by Bienville that France had taken possession......Sept. 15, 1699 Sauvolle appointed governor of Louisiana......Dec. 7, 1699 D'Iberville returns fr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mississippi, (search)
end the Mississippi as far as lat. 33°......1673 La Salle descends the Mississippi to its mouth......1682 Lemoine d'iberville plants a colony on the bay of Biloxi......May, 1699 Iberville, Bienville, and Chevalier de Tonti ascend the Mississippi to the present site of Natchez......February, 1700 Fort Rosalie, at Natch Three hundred emigrants, destined for the lands of Madame de Chaumonot, arrive at Pascagoula......Jan. 3, 1721 Seat of government of Louisiana removed from Biloxi to New Orleans......1723 Chopart, commander of Fort Rosalie, demands that Great Sun, head of the Natchez tribe of Indians, should vacate White Apple village, aip Island, under construction since 1855......Jan. 20, 1861 State convention ratifies the constitution of the Confederate States......March 26, 1861 Town of Biloxi captured by Federal naval force under Capt. Melancthon Smith......Dec. 31, 1861 Confederate government removes the State archives from Jackson to Columbus for