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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 133 results in 106 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arbuthnot, Marriott, -1794 (search)
Arbuthnot, Marriott, -1794 British naval officer; born about 1711; became a post-captain in 1747. From 1775 to 1778 he was naval commissioner resident at Halifax, Marriott Arbuthnot. Nova Scotia. Having been raised to the rank of vice-admiral in 1779, he obtained the chief command on the American station, and was blockaded by the Count d'estaing in the harbor of New York. In the spring of 1780 he co-operated with Sir Henry Clinton in the siege of Charleston, S. C. In February, 1793, he became admiral of the blue. He died in London, Jan. 31, 1794.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Artesian Wells, (search)
pper soil to strata containing water which has percolated from a higher level. and which rises to that level through the boring-tube. The following are some of the deepest wells in the United States: Location.Depth.Bored.Remarks. St. Louis, Mo2,197 ft.1849-52108,000 gallons daily. Salty. St. Louis, Mo3,843 ft.1866-70Does not rise to the surface. Salty. Louisville, Ky,2,086 ft.1856-57330,000 gallons daily. Mineral. Columbus, O.2,775 1/2 ft. Water saline, 91° Fahr.: no force Charleston, S. C.1,250 ft.184828,800 gallons daily. Saline. South Dakota, sometimes called the Artesian State, has many powerful artesian wells in the valley of the James River, from 800 to 1,600 feet deep, affording a bountiful supply of pure water. The water from great depths is always warmer than at the surface. One of the most remarkable attempts to sink an artesian well in the United Slates was made in Galveston, Tex. A depth of 3,070 feet and 9 inches was reached, without penetrating any
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bachman, John, 1790-1874 (search)
Bachman, John, 1790-1874 Naturalist; born in Dutchess county, N. Y., Feb. 4, 1790. He was pastor of a Lutheran church at Charleston, S. C., in 1815-74; but is best known from his association with Auduhbon in the preparation of his great work on ornithology. He contributed the most of the text on the quadrupeds of North America, which Audubon and his sons illustrated. He died in Charleston, S. C., Feb. 25, 1874. Bachman, John, 1790-1874 Naturalist; born in Dutchess county, N. Y., Feb. 4, 1790. He was pastor of a Lutheran church at Charleston, S. C., in 1815-74; but is best known from his association with Auduhbon in the preparation of his great work on ornithology. He contributed the most of the text on the quadrupeds of North America, which Audubon and his sons illustrated. He died in Charleston, S. C., Feb. 25, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burke, Aedanus, 1743-1802 (search)
Burke, Aedanus, 1743-1802 Jurist; born in Galway, Ireland, June 16, 1743; was educated at St. Omers for a priest; emigrated to View of the place where the British laid down their arms. South Carolina, and there engaged with the patriots in their conflict with Great Britain. He was a lawyer, and in 1778 was made a judge of the Supreme Court of South Carolina. He served two years in the army; was in Congress (1789-91); and after serving in the State legislature, he became chancellor of the common-wealth. He died in Charleston, S. C., March 3, 1802. Judge Burke was a thorough republican, and wrote a famous pamphlet against the Cincinnati Society (q. v.) that was translated into French by Mirabeau, and used by him with much effect during the French Revolution. Burke opposed its aristocratic features. He also opposed the national Constitution, fearing consolidated power. Burke, Edmund
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Calhoun, John Caldwell 1782-1850 (search)
of all action on the part of others, was held by Mr. Calhoun nearly all his life. His influence in his own State was very great; and his political tenets, practically carried out by acts of nullification, brought South Carolina to the verge of civil war in 1832; and it made that State foremost and most conspicuous in inaugurating the Civil War. He died in Washington, D. C., March 31, 1850. His remains John Caldwell Calhoun. lie under a neat monument in St. Philip's church-yard at Charleston, S. C. His writings and a biography have been published in 6 volumes. See Webster, Daniel. Government of the United States. The following is Senator Calhoun's conception ` of the national government, from his discourse on The Constitution : Ours is a system of government, compounded of the separate governments of the several States composing the Union, and of one common government of all its members, called the government of the United States. The former preceded the latter, wh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
849 Bridgeport, Conn.70,99648,86622,130 Lynn, Mass.68,51355,72712,786 Oakland, Cal.66,96048,68218,278 Lawrence, Mass.62,55944,65417,905 New Bedford. Mass.62,44240,73321,709 Des Moines, Ia.62,13950,09312,046 Springfield, Mass.62,05944,17917,880 Somerville, Mass.61,64340,15221,491 Troy, N. Y.60,65160,956*305 Hoboken, N. J.59,36443,64815,716 Evansville, Ind.59,00750,7568,251 Manchester. N. H.56,98744,12612,861 Utica, N. Y.56,38344,00712,376 Peoria. Ill.56,10041,02415,076 Charleston, S. C.55,80754,955852 Savannah, Ga.54,.24443,18911,055 Salt Lake City, Utah.53,53144,8438,688 San Antonio, Tex.53,32137,67315,648 Duluth, Minn.52,96933,11519,854 Erie, Pa.52,733 40,63412,099 Elizabeth, N. J.52,13037,76414,366 Wilkesbarre, Pa.51.72137,71814,003 Kansas City, Kan.51,41838,31613,102 Harrisburg, Pa.50,16739,38510,782 Portland, Me.50,14536,42513,720 Yonkers, N. Y.47,93132,03315,898 * Decrease. Cities with population exceeding 25,000.—Continued. City.population.incr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Charleston, S. C. (search)
Charleston, S. C. City, port of entry, and commercial metropolis of South Carolina; on a peninsula between the Cooper and Ashley rivers, which unite in forming an admirable harbor; 82 miles northeast of Savannah, Ga. The city was founded in 1680 by an English colony; was occupied by the British in 1780-82; and was the State capital till 1790. It has been the scene of many stirring and historical events. The celebrated Democratic National Convention of 1860 was opened here, and after the split among the delegates an adjourned session was held in Baltimore. It was the birthplace, the same year, of the Secession movement; the first act of hostility to the national government occurred here (see Sumter, Fort; Beauregard, Pierre Gustave Toutant); was besieged and bombarded during the last two years of the war; and was evacuated by the Confederates on Feb. 17, 1865. On Aug. 31, 1886, a large part of the city was destroyed by an earthquake, in which many lives were lost. In the f
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cincinnati, Society of the (search)
incinnati is still in existence, and also State societies. The president-general from 1854 till his death in 1893 was Hamilton Fish, son of Col. Nicholas Fish, one of the original members. In 1900 William Wayne, of Pennsylvania, held the office. The order worn by the president-general at the meetings of the society is a beautifully jewelled one. It was presented to Washington by the French officers. The society met with much jealous opposition from the earnest republicans of the day. Among the most Order of the Cincinnati. powerful of these opponents was Judge Aedanus Burke, of Charleston, S. C., who, in an able dissertation, undertook to prove that the society created two distinct orders among the Americans—first, a race of hereditary nobles founded on the military, together with the most influen- Society of the Cincinnati—Member's certificate. tial families and men in the State; and, second, the people, or plebeians. These suspicions were natural, but were not justif
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
3. The legislature of Connecticut voted $2,000,000 for the public defence.—4. The governors of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, and other States met at Cleveland, O., to devise plans for the defence of the Western States.—7. The governor of Tennessee announced a military league between the State and the Confederacy.—10. The President of the United States proclaimed martial law on the islands of Key West, the Tortugas, and Santa Rosa.—11. The blockade of Charleston, S. C., established.—13. The blockade of the Mississippi River at Cairo established.—15. The legislature of Massachusetts offered to loan the United States government $7,000,000.—20. All mail-steamships on the coast, and running in connection with the Confederates, were stopped.—21. The Confederate Congress, at Montgomery, adjourn to meet at Richmond, July 20.—26. New Orleans blockaded by sloop-of-war Brooklyn.— 27. The ports of Mobile and Savannah blockaded.—June 1. The
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cotton. (search)
Carolinas so early as 1621, and its limited growth there is noted in 1666. In 1736 it was cultivated in gardens as far north as latitude 36°, on the eastern shore of Maryland. Forty years later it was cultivated on Cape May, N. J.; but it was almost unknown, except as a garden plant, until after the Revolutionary War. At the beginning of that conflict General Delagall had thirty acres under cultivation near Savannah, Ga. In 1748 seven bags of cotton-wool were exported to England from Charleston, S. C., valued at £ 3 11s. 5d. a bag. There were two or three other small shipments afterwards, before the war. At Liverpool eight bags shipped from the United States in 1784 were seized, on the ground that so much cotton could not be produced in the United States. In 1786 the first seaisland cotton was raised, off the coast of Georgia, and its exportation began in 1788 by Alexander Bissell, of St. Simon's Island. The seeds were obtained from the Bahama Islands. The first successful crop o
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