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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 103 27 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 9 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 46 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 40 4 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 40 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 13 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 22 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) or search for Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 23 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Assay offices (search)
Assay offices In the United States are government establishments where the precious metals are officially tested to determine their purity, and where, also, individuals may deposit gold and silver bullion and receive therefor its market value, less the charge of assaying. In 1901 these offices were located in New York City; Boise City, Idaho; Helena, Mont.; Denver, Col.; Seattle, Wash.; San Francisco, Cal.; Charlotte, N. C.; and St. Louis, Mo. See coinage.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blackstock's, battle at. (search)
Blackstock's, battle at. In 1780 General Sumter collected a small force near Charlotte.. N. C., and with these returned to South Carolina. (See fishing Creek.) For many weeks he annoyed the British and Tories very much. Cornwallis. who called him the Carolina Gamecock, tried hard to catch him. Tarleton, Wemyss. and others were sent out for the purpose. On the night of Nov. 12 Major Wemyss, at the head of a British detachment, fell upon him near the Broad River, but was repulsed. Eight days afterwards he was encamped at Blackstock's plantation, on the Tyger River, in Union District, where he was joined by some Georgians under Colonels Clarke and Twiggs. There he was attacked by Tarleton, when a severe battle ensued (Nov. 20). The British were repulsed with a loss in killed and wounded of about 300, while the Americans lost only three killed and five wounded. General Sumter was among the latter, and was detained from the field several mouths.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brevard, Ephraim, 1750- (search)
Brevard, Ephraim, 1750- Physician; born in Charlotte, N. C., about 1750; was graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1768; was educated for a physician, and practised the profession in Charlotte. He was secretary of the famous Mecklenburg Convention. When the British invaded the Carolinas, he entered the Continental army r a physician, and practised the profession in Charlotte. He was secretary of the famous Mecklenburg Convention. When the British invaded the Carolinas, he entered the Continental army as a surgeon, and was made a prisoner at Charleston in 1780, Broken with disease, he returned to Charlotte after his release, and died about 1783.r a physician, and practised the profession in Charlotte. He was secretary of the famous Mecklenburg Convention. When the British invaded the Carolinas, he entered the Continental army as a surgeon, and was made a prisoner at Charleston in 1780, Broken with disease, he returned to Charlotte after his release, and died about 1783.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buford, Abraham, 1778-1833 (search)
Buford, Abraham, 1778-1833 Military officer: born in Virginia: became colonel of the 11th Virginia Regiment, May 16, 1778. In May. 1780, when his command, hastening to the relief of Lincoln at Charleston, heard of his surrender, they returned towards North Carolina. Buford's command consisted of nearly 400 Continental infantry, a small detachment of Colonel Washington's cavalry, and two field-pieces. He had reached Camden in safety, and was retreating leisurely towards Charlotte, when Colonel Tarleton, with 700 men, all mounted, sent in pursuit by Cornwallis, overtook Buford upon the Waxhaw Creek. Tarleton had marched 100 miles in fifty-four hours. With only his cavalry — the remainder were mounted infantry — he almost surrounded Buford before that officer was aware of danger, and demanded an instant surrender upon the terms given to the Americans at Charleston. These were too humiliating, and Buford refused compliance. While flags for the conference were passing and repas
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Confederate States of America (search)
nville to Greensboro, N. C., and made their official residence in a railroad carriage, where they remained until the 15th, when, it being seen that the surrender of Johnston was inevitable, they again took flight on horses and in ambulances for Charlotte, for the railway was crippled. There Davis proposed to establish the future capital of the Confederacy, but the surrender of Johnston prevented. The fugitive leaders of the government now took flight again on horseback, escorted by 2,000 cavalry. They turned their faces towards the Gulf of Mexico, for the way to Mississippi and Texas was barred. At Charlotte, George Davis, the Confederate Attorney-General, resigned his office; Trenholm gave up the Secretaryship of the Treasury on the banks of the Catawba, where Postmaster-General Reagan, having no further official business to transact, took Trenholm's place. The flight continued Gulfward, the escort constantly diminishing. At Washington, Ga., the rest of Davis's cabinet desert
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Declaration of Independence, Mecklenburg, (search)
ade known are, in brief, as follows: In the spring of 1775, Col. Adam Alexander called upon the people of Mecklenburg county to appoint delegates to a convention to devise ways and means to assist their brethren in Boston. The delegates met in Charlotte on May 19, almost immediately after the receipt of news of the battle of Lexington. Colonel Alexander was elected chairman, and John McKnitt Alexander clerk of the convention. After a free and full discussion of the various objects for which tished in this province. These resolutions were supplemented by a number of minor provisions to insure the safety of the citizens, and at 2 A. M. on May 20, the resolutions were unanimously adopted. A few days afterwards Capt. James Jack, of Charlotte, was appointed messenger to convey a draft of the resolutions to the Congress then in session in Philadelphia, and on the return of Captain Jack, the Charlotte convention was informed that their proceedings had been individually approved by the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ellis, John Willis, 1820-1861 (search)
Ellis, John Willis, 1820-1861 Governor; born in Rowan county, N. C., Nov. 25, 1820; graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1841, and admitted to the bar in 1842. He was governor of North Carolina in 1858-61. In the name of his State he occupied Fort Macon, the works at Wilmington, and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville, Jan. 2, 1861. In April of the same year he ordered the seizure of the United States mint at Charlotte. He died in Raleigh, N. C., in 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fishing Creek, action at. (search)
Fishing Creek, action at. When General Gates was approaching Camden in 1780 he sent General Sumter with a detachment to intercept a convoy of stores passing from Ninety-six to Rawdon's camp at Camden. Sumter was successful. He captured forty-four wagons loaded with clothing and made a number of prisoners. On hearing of the defeat of Gates, Sumter continued his march up the Catawba River and encamped (Aug. 18) near the mouth of Fishing Creek. There he was surprised by Tarleton, and his troops were routed with great slaughter. More than fifty were killed and 300 were made prisoners. Tarleton recaptured the British prisoners and all the wagons and their contents. Sumter escaped, and in such haste that he rode into Charlotte, N. C., without hat or saddle.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Graham, Joseph 1759-1836 (search)
Graham, Joseph 1759-1836 Military officer; born in Chester county, Pa., Oct. 13, 1759; removed to North Carolina at an early age. In 1778 he joined the Continental army and served through the remainder of the war with gallantry; in 1780 received three bullet wounds and six sabre-thrusts while guarding the retreat of Maj. W. R. Davie, near Charlotte; later, after his recovery, he defeated 600 Tories near Fayetteville with a force of 136 men.. In 1814 he was commissioned major-general, when he led 1,000 men from North Carolina against the Creek Indians. He died in Lincoln county, N. C., Nov. 12, 1836.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Greene, Nathanael 1742- (search)
f command in action. This office he resigned in August, 1780. In the battle of Springfield, in June, 1780, he was conspicuous. During Washington's visit to Hartford (September, 1780) he was in command of the army, and was president of the court of inquiry in the case of Major Andre soon afterwards (see Andre, John). Greene succeeded Gates in command of the Southern army, Oct. 14, 1780, which he found a mere skeleton, while a powerful enemy was in front of it. He took command of it at Charlotte, N. C., Dec. 4. By skill and energy he brought order and strength out of confusion, and soon taught Cornwallis that a better Nathanael Greene. general than Gates confronted him. He made a famous retreat through Carolina into Virginia, and, turning back, fought the British army at Guildford Courthouse, N. C., March 15, 1781. Greene then pushed into South Carolina, and was defeated by Lord Rawdon in the battle of Hobkirk's Hill, April 25. Soon afterwards he besieged the fort of Ninety-Six,
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