Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Augusta (Georgia, United States) or search for Augusta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 79 results in 41 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, Archibald, 1772- (search)
Alexander, Archibald, 1772- Theologian; born in Augusta (now Rockbridge) county. Va., April 17, 1772; was of Scotch descent, and became teacher in a Virginian family at the age of seventeen years. In 1791 he entered the ministry as an itinerant missionary in his native State. In 1789 he became president of Hampden-Sidney College; left it in 1801; married a daughter of Rev. Mr. Waddell, the celebrated blind preacher in Virginia, and afterwards (1807) became pastor of a Presbyterian church in Philadelphia. In 1810 he was elected president of Union College, Georgia, but did not accept it. On the establishment of the Theological Seminary at Princeton. N. J., in 1811, Dr. Alexander was chosen its first professor, which position he held until his death. Oct. 22, 1851. Among his numerous writings his Outlines of the evidences of Christianity, used as a text-book in several colleges, is most extensively known. It has passed through many editions in various languages.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arsenals. (search)
Arsenals. In 1901, arsenals, armories, and ordnance depots were established at the following places: Arsenals--Allegheny, Pa.; Augusta, Ga.; Benicia, Cal.; Columbia, Tenn.; Fort Monroe, Va.; Frankford, Pa.; Indianapolis, Ind.; Kennebec (Augusta), Me.; New York (Governor's Island), N. Y.; Rock Island, Ill.; San Antonio, Tex.; Watertown, Mass.; and Watervliet, N. Y. Armory--Springfield, Mass. Powder Depots--St. Louis, Mo., and Dover, N. J. Ordnance Proving Ground--Sandy Hook (Fort 1901, arsenals, armories, and ordnance depots were established at the following places: Arsenals--Allegheny, Pa.; Augusta, Ga.; Benicia, Cal.; Columbia, Tenn.; Fort Monroe, Va.; Frankford, Pa.; Indianapolis, Ind.; Kennebec (Augusta), Me.; New York (Governor's Island), N. Y.; Rock Island, Ill.; San Antonio, Tex.; Watertown, Mass.; and Watervliet, N. Y. Armory--Springfield, Mass. Powder Depots--St. Louis, Mo., and Dover, N. J. Ordnance Proving Ground--Sandy Hook (Fort Hancock), N. J.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Atlanta, (search)
Atlanta, City, county-seat of Fulton county, and capital of the State of Georgia; 171 miles north by west of Augusta: popularly known as The Gate City ; is noted for the historical events of which it was the centre, for its extensive commercial and manufacturing interests, and for its educational institutions. In its suburbs is Fort McPherson, one of the most complete of the modern military posts in the country. Cotton expositions were held here in 1881 and 1895. The population in 1890 was 65,533; in 1900, 89,872. In the Civil War the main National and Confederate armies remained quiet in their camps after their arrival at the Chattahoochee until the middle of July, 1864. Sherman was 8 miles from the city. On the 17th he resumed offensive and active operations, by throwing Thomas's army across the Chattahoochee, close to Schofield's right, with directions to move forward. McPherson moved against the railway east of Decatur, and destroyed (July 18) 4 miles of the track.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Augusta, (search)
Augusta, City and county-seat of Richmond county, Ga.; on the Savannah River at the head of steamboat navigation; 120 miles northwest of Savannah. It is one of the largest and most progressive manufacturing cities in the South. It was founded by English settlers under Oglethorpe, and received the name of an English princesspopulation in 1890 was 33,300; in 1900, 39,441. When Cornwallis proceeded to subjugate South Carolina, he sent Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, a Tory leader, to hold Augusta. Over this garrison Pickens and Clarke had kept watch, and when, on May 20, 1781, they were joined by Lee and his legion, they proceeded to invest the fort there. They took Fort Galphin, 12 miles below, on the 21st, and then an officer was sent to demand the surrender of Augusta. Lieutenant-Colonel Brown was one of the most cruel of the Tories in that region, and the partisans were anxious to make him a prisoner. He refused to surrender. A regular siege began May 23, and continued unti
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
reek (near Camden, S. C.)Aug. 16, 1780 King's Mountain (S. C.)Oct. 7, 1780 Fish Dam FordNov. 18, 1780 BlackstocksNov. 20, 1780 CowpensJan. 17, 1781 GuilfordMar. 15, 1781 Hobkirk's HillApril 25, 1781 Ninety-six (Siege of)May and June 1781 Augusta (Siege of)May and June 1781 JamestownJuly 9, 1781 Eutaw SpringsSept. 8, 1781 Yorktown (Siege of)Sept. and Oct. 1781 naval engagements. Hampton, Va. (British fleet repulsed)Oct. 24, 1775 Fort Sullivan, Charleston Harbor (British fleet repulreek (near Camden, S. C.)Aug. 16, 1780 King's Mountain (S. C.)Oct. 7, 1780 Fish Dam FordNov. 18, 1780 BlackstocksNov. 20, 1780 CowpensJan. 17, 1781 GuilfordMar. 15, 1781 Hobkirk's HillApril 25, 1781 Ninety-six (Siege of)May and June 1781 Augusta (Siege of)May and June 1781 JamestownJuly 9, 1781 Eutaw SpringsSept. 8, 1781 Yorktown (Siege of)Sept. and Oct. 1781 naval engagements. Hampton, Va. (British fleet repulsed)Oct. 24, 1775 Fort Sullivan, Charleston Harbor (British fleet repul
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brier Creek, battle of. (search)
Brier Creek, battle of. Colonel Ashe, of North Carolina, was sent by General Lincoln, with 2,000 men, to drive the British from Augusta, Ga., in 1779. The latter fled when Ashe appeared on the opposite side of the river, and pushed towards the sea, led by Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell. Ashe crossed and pursued as far as Brier Creek, 40 miles below Augusta, on the Georgia side of the Savannah River, where he encamped. He was surprised (March 3) and utterly defeated by General Prevost, who wAugusta, on the Georgia side of the Savannah River, where he encamped. He was surprised (March 3) and utterly defeated by General Prevost, who was marching up from Savannah to support Campbell. Ashe lost almost his entire army by death, captivity, and dispersion. Some were killed, others perished in the morasses, and many were drowned in attempting to pass the Savannah River. This blow deprived Lincoln of about one-fourth of his army and led to the temporary re-establishment of royal authority in Georgia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Campbell, Sir Archibald 1739-1791 (search)
Campbell, Sir Archibald 1739-1791 Military officer; born in Inverary, Scotland, in 1739; entered the British army in 1758; became a lieutenant-colonel in 1775; with a part of his command was captured in Boston Harbor early in the Revolutionary War, and was cruelly treated in retaliation for treatment of American officers captured by the British. On Dec. 29, 1778, he captured Savannah, Ga., and gave orders to his officers to show leniency to the people. On Jan. 29, 1779, he took Augusta, but on Feb. 13, he was forced to evacuate that city. He died in London, England, March 31, 1791.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canals. (search)
rses, has given way to the ship-canal, through which a war-ship can safely speed. Canals in the United States. name.Cost.Completed.LengthLOCATION. in miles. Albemarle and Chesapeake$1,641,363186044Norfolk, Va., to Currituck Sound, N. C. Augusta1,500,00018479Savannah River, Ga., to Augusta, Ga. Black River3,581,954184935Rome, N. Y., to Lyons Falls, N. Y. Cayuga and Seneca 2,232,632183925Montezuma, N. Y., to Cayuga and Seneca Lakes, N. Y. Champlain 4,044,000182281Whitehall, N. Y., to Augusta, Ga. Black River3,581,954184935Rome, N. Y., to Lyons Falls, N. Y. Cayuga and Seneca 2,232,632183925Montezuma, N. Y., to Cayuga and Seneca Lakes, N. Y. Champlain 4,044,000182281Whitehall, N. Y., to Waterford. N. Y. Chesapeake and Delaware3,730,230182914Chesapeake City, Md., to Delaware City, Del. Chesapeake and Ohio11,290,3271850184Cumberland, Md., to Washington, D. C. Chicago Drainage. See next page. Companys 90,000184722Mississippi River, La., to Bayou Black, La. Delaware and Raritan 4,888,749183866New Brunswick, N. J., to Trenton, N. J. Delaware Division2,433,350183060Easton, Pa., to Bristol, Pa. Des Moines Rapids4,582,00918777 1-2At Des Moines Rapids, Mississippi River. Disma
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
crease since 19001890.1890. Norfolk, Va 46,62434,87111,753 Waterbury, Conn 45,85928,64617,213 Holyoke, Mass.45.71235.63710,075 Fort Wayne, Ind. 45,11535,3939,722 Youngstown, O.44,88533.22011,665 Houston, Tex44,63327,55717,076 Covington, Ky42,93837,3715,567 Akron, O.42,72827,60115,127 Dallas, Tex 42,63838,0674,571 Saginaw, Mich.42,34546 322*3,977 Lancaster, Pa41,45932,0119,448 Lincoln, Neb40,16955,154*14,985 Brockton, Mass.40,06327,29412,769 Binghamton, N. Y 39,64735.0054,642 Augusta, Ga39,41133,3006,141 Pawtucket, R. I.39,23127.63311,598 Altoona, Pa38,97330,3378,636 Wheeling. W. Va 38,87834,5224,356 Mobile, Ala38,46931,0767,393 Birmingham, Ala 38,41526,17812,237 Little Rock, Ark38,30725,87412,433 Springfield, O.38,25331,8956,358 Galveston, Tex 37,78929,0848,705 Tacoma, Wash37,71436,0061,708 Haverhill, Mass. 37,17527,4129,763 Spokane. Wash36,84819,92216,926 Terre Haute, Ind.36,67330,2176,456 Dubuque, Ia 36,29730,3115,986 Quincy, Ill. 36,25231,4944,758 S
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
ed retaliation for the execution of ten Confederates in Missouri.—18. Confederate cruiser Alabama escaped the San Jacinto at Martinique.—19. First general convention of The Protestant Episcopal Church of the Confederate States of America met at Augusta, Ga.—25. Confederate raid into Poolesville, Md. A body of 4,000 Confederates attacked Newbern, but were forced to retreat in disorder.—27. Nearly all the political prisoners released from forts and government prisons. Confederates defeated neates, General Butler put eighty-seven Confederate prisoners of war at work, under the fire of Confederate shells, at Dutch Gap.—17. The governors of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Missouri held a conference at Augusta, Ga., and resolved to strengthen the Confederate army with white men and negroes.—18. Some of the feminine nobility of England and Confederate women opened a fair in Liverpool for the benefit of the Confederate cause.—22. General Auger, abo
1 2 3 4 5