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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 17 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 12 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Henry Whiting or search for Henry Whiting in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gaines's Mill, battle of. (search)
force about 35,000. For hours the struggle along the whole line was fierce and persistent, and for a long time the issue was doubtful. At five o'clock Porter called for more aid, and McClellan sent him the brigades of Meagher and French, of Richardson's division. The Confederates were making desperate efforts to break the line of the Nationals, but for a long time it stood firm, though continually growing thinner. Finally a furious assault by Jackson and the divisions of Longstreet and Whiting was made upon Butterfield's brigade, which had long been fighting. It gave way and fell back, and with it several batteries. Then the whole line fell back. Porter called up all of his reserves and remaining artillery (about eighty guns), covered the retreat of his infantry, and checked the advance of the victors for a moment. Just then General Cooke, without orders, attacked the Confederate flank with his cavalry, which was repulsed and thrown into disorder. The horses, terrified by th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Malvern Hill, battle of. (search)
r it was too far separated from his supplies; so, on the morning of July 1, he went on the Galena to seek for an eligible place for a base of supplies, and for an encampment for the army. During his absence the Confederates brought on a battle, which proved to be a most sanguinary one. Lee had concentrated his troops at Glendale, on the morning of July 1, but did not get ready for a full attack until late in the afternoon. He formed his line with the divisions of Generals Jackson, Ewell, Whiting, and D. H. Hill on the left (a large portion of Ewell's in reserve); Generals Magruder and Huger on the right; while the troops of A. P. Hill and Longstreet were held in reserve on the left. The latter took no part in the engagement that followed. The National line of battle was formed with Porter's corps on the left (with Sykes's division on the left and Morell's on the right), where the artillery of the reserve, under Colonel Hunt, was so disposed on high ground that a concentrated fire
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Montreal, massacre at (search)
n, contributed $10,000 towards the expedition. About 1,800 troops—the quotas of Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey—assembled at Albany with the intention of attacking Montreal simultaneously with the appearance of the fleet from Boston before Quebec. Nicholson was in general command; and at Albany he was joined by 500 warriors of the Five Nations and 1,000 palatines, chiefly from the Mohawk Valley, making the whole force about 4,000 strong. Nicholson was assisted by Colonels Schuyler, Whiting, and Ingoldsby, and on Aug. 28 they began their march for Canada. At Lake George, Nicholson heard of the miscarriage of the naval expedition, and returned to Albany, abandoning the enterprise. In 1775, when the republicans invaded Canada, General Carleton was in command of a few troops at Montreal. With about 800 men he marched to the relief of the garrison at St. John, after he heard of the capture of Chambly. He crossed the St. Lawrence in small boats, and when about to land at Lon
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whiting, Henry 1790-1851 (search)
Whiting, Henry 1790-1851 Military officer; born in Lancaster, Mass., about 1790; joined the army in 1808; promoted first lieutenant in 1811; was placed on the staff of Gen. John P. Boyd, and afterwards on that of Gen. Alexander Macomb; promoted captain in 1817; was chief quartermaster of the army of General Taylor during the Mexican War: won distinction at Buena Vista, in recognition of which he was brevetted brigadier-general, United States army, Feb. 23, 1847. His publications include Ontway, the son of the forest (a poem) ; Life of Zebulon M. Pike, in Sparks's American biography; joint author of Historical and scientific sketches of Michigan, etc.; and editor of Washington's Revolutionary orders issued during the years 1778, 1780, 1781, and 1782, selected from the Mss. Of John Whiting. He died in St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 16, 1851.