Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Winfield Scott Hancock or search for Winfield Scott Hancock in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 5 document sections:

George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 2 (search)
nt, second lieutenant Fourth Regiment of Infantry, afterward commander-in-chief United States Army and President of the United States. Lewis A. Armistead, first lieutenant Sixth Regiment of Infantry, afterward commanded a brigade in Pickett's charge at the battle of Gettysburg and was wounded and died within the Union lines. Edward Johnson, first lieutenant Sixth Regiment of Infantry, afterward commanded a division in the Army of Northern Virginia at the battle of Gettysburg. Winfield S. Hancock, second lieutenant Sixth Regiment of Infantry, afterward commanded the centre of the Army of the Potomac at the battle of Gettysburg. Lafayette McLaws, first lieutenant Seventh Regiment of Infantry, afterward commanded a division in the Army of Northern Virginia at the battle of Gettysburg. James Longstreet, first lieutenant Eighth Regiment of Infantry, afterward commanded the First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, at the battle of Gettysburg. George E. Pickett, second lieut
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
The Second Corps, commanded by Major-General Winfield Scott Hancock, numbered 12,996 men; it was onand Cumberland, About thirty miles west of Hancock, off of map. and to the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal; had been at Hancock on the 27th; and, under orders, had marched to McConnellsburg, collecting halted outside of Taneytown and bivouacked. Hancock rode over to the commanding general's Headquaviews and intentions, be able to replace him. Hancock, gallant soldier as he was, and possessing al a battle there. His written instructions to Hancock were these: Headquarters army of the Potomd Gibbon to move the corps for that place. Hancock, as was seen in his written instructions, hadordered to Gettysburg. About four o'clock, Hancock sent from Gettysburg a verbal message by one ld the ground until dark; meaning by this, as Hancock afterward explained, in his testimony before of maintaining the position. At 5.25 P. M., Hancock sent the following written despatch by his ai[7 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 27 (search)
y, the court express their opinion that explicit orders should have been given assigning one officer to the command of all the troops intended to engage in the assault when the commanding General was not present to witness the operations. Winfield S. Hancock, Major General United States Volunteers, President of Court. Edward Schriver, Inspector General U. S. A., Judge Advocate. The court then adjourned sine die. Winfield S. Hancock, Major General United States Volunteers, President of Court.ave been given assigning one officer to the command of all the troops intended to engage in the assault when the commanding General was not present to witness the operations. Winfield S. Hancock, Major General United States Volunteers, President of Court. Edward Schriver, Inspector General U. S. A., Judge Advocate. The court then adjourned sine die. Winfield S. Hancock, Major General United States Volunteers, President of Court. Edward Schriver, Inspector General, U. S. A., Judge Advocate.
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
ding position. General G. will see this despatch. The battle is quiet now. I think we will be all right until night. I have sent all the trains back. When night comes it can be told better what had best be done. I think we can retire; if not we can fight here, as the ground appears not unfavorable with good troops. I will communicate in a few moments with General Slocum, and transfer the command to him. Howard says that Doubleday's command gave way. Your obedient servant, Winfield S. Hancock, Major General Commanding Corps. General Warren is here. General Butterfield, Chief of Staff. Headquarters army of the Potomac, March 9, 1864. Official copy: Chas. E. Pease, A. A. G. L Headquarters army of the Potomac, July 1, 1863—7 P. M. commanding officer, 5th Corps: The major general commanding directs that you move up to Gettysburg at once upon receipt of this order, if not already ordered to do so by General Slocum. The present prospect is that our genera
6. Greene, George S., II, 91, 92, 94, 101, 359. Gregg, David McM., II, 8, 15, 25, 60, 65, 71, 90, 94, 95, 100, 109, 126, 130, 288, 370, 383. Gregg, M., I, 291, 294. Griffin, Mrs., I, 364. Griffin, Charles, I, 235, 280, 364, 368, 372; II, 231, 268, 281. Grout, W. W., II, 350, 351. Grover, C., I, 286, 289, 293, 315. Gunnell, I, 234. Gurowsky, II, 188. H Hall, Frederick, I, 10. Hall, James A., II, 46, 47. Hampton, Wade, II, 22, 94, 101, 129, 267. Hancock, Winfield S., I, 196; II, 7, 22, 25, 35-41, 54-56, 62-64, 66, 70, 78, 86-88, 92, 95, 96, 100, 104, 108-110, 136, 161, 163, 164, 182, 185, 188-190, 198, 201, 205-209, 212, 214, 215, 219, 222-225, 235, 237, 248, 249, 254, 264, 288, 328, 342, 349, 353, 354, 356-358, 360, 379, 390, 391, 401, 409, 410, 415-419, 422. Hardie, J. A., II, 1, 2. Harding, Geo., I, 336; II, 165, 167, 171, 176, 178, 183, 184, 187, 208, 220, 253, 266. Harding, Mrs. Geo., II, 266. Hare, George Harrison, I, 69. Har