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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 718 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 564 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 458 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 458 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 376 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 306 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 280 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 279 23 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 237 5 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 216 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Fitz Lee or search for Fitz Lee in all documents.

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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
cretly rendezvoused three brigades of cavalry (Hampton's, Fitz Lee's, and W. H. F. Lee's, the latter under command of Colone the night. Toward the afternoon of July 2, Stuart, with Fitz Lee's and Chambliss's brigades, took position on the extreme on's and Jones's brigades of cavalry, which had been left by Lee south of the Potomac, had, in default of the presence of Stuart's Cavalry, been ordered to the front by Lee, on the 1st of July, and were now on their way up the Cumberland Valley, as bf the army, the probability of an attempt on the part of General Lee to make a flank movement around its left, and the disposor of acting on the defensive and awaiting the action of General Lee. General Meade said: Gibbon, if Lee attacks me to-morrowLee attacks me to-morrow it will be on your front. Gibbon expressed surprise and asked why he thought so. Because, replied General Meade, he has trig this time was not idle. Ewell had reported his success to Lee, and the latter, encouraged by his view of the result of the