Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Baldy Smith or search for Baldy Smith in all documents.

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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
llytown, September 26, 1861. Yesterday, Baldy Smith Brigadier-General William F. Smith, comm Pa. Vols. being just beyond Langley, where Baldy Smith had his skirmish. Hamilton Kuhn did get ill come to him. They had driven out to see Baldy Smith and myself. After spending a little while ternoon, as if in defiance of our parade. General Smith required his division to cheer McClellan. nklin. Our corps is to be under Franklin. Baldy Smith takes Franklin's corps, and Sykes is to hav to Butterfield. I saw to-day Franklin and Baldy Smith, who referred to this matter, and said Burnre George's regiment moved over here, when Colonel Smith, commanding, took a wrong road, so that th ordered, and I immediately sent for Franklin, Smith, Reynolds, Brooks and others to join in celebruch to say. He is a man of very few words. Baldy Smith has returned, and Franklin is off for a feway I went to see General Stoneman and Lieutenant Colonel Smith Charles R. Smith, of Philadelphia.[7 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
it as hard to recruit his army as I do mine. I do not hear of any reinforcements of any consequence joining him. At the same time it is very difficult to obtain any minute or reliable intelligence of his movements. I saw to-day a note from Baldy Smith, who is at Hagerstown, commanding four hundred men and a secesh hospital. He says he is afraid to make any stir, for fear they should serve him as they have Franklin, who is at Baton Rouge, commanding a division under Banks. This is pretty htrenched ourselves. How long this game is to be played it is impossible to tell; but in the long run, we ought to succeed, because it is in our power more promptly to fill the gaps in men and material which this constant fighting produces. Baldy Smith's corps has joined, and he is placed under my orders. Headquarters army of the Potomac, 9 P. M., June 5, 1864. Since our last battle on the 3d inst. we have been comparatively quiet. The enemy has tried his hand once or twice at the offe