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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 388 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 347 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 217 51 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 153 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 146 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 132 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 128 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 5 document sections:

George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 3 (search)
of legislature, passed at the instance of Governor Andrew G. Curtin, of Pennsylvania, after the quota of that State, under the first call of the President for troops, had been filled. They were organized as a Reserve Corps of the Commonwealth, and consisted of thirteen regiments of infantry, one of cavalry, one of artillery, and placed under the command of Major-General McCall. On the urgent demand of the authorities at Washington for reinforcements, after the defeat of the Union army at Bull Run, this force had been despatched as rapidly as possible to that city, and were mustered into the service of the United States as a division which became part of the Army of the Potomac, then being organized by Major-General George B. McClellan. General Meade, now in the forty-sixth year of his age, was about to enter upon a field of labor entirely different from that in which he had been engaged for the preceding thirteen years. The pursuits which he had so relished were to be laid aside
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
stood, have fallen back to their old lines at Bull Run. They have had a force above us at Leesburg,s Bluff disaster, greater in my judgment than Bull Run, inasmuch as it was clearly the result of badisgraceful than the behavior of our troops at Bull Run. At Ball's Bluff, though we were overpowered Virginia last summer precipitated and caused Bull Run. Now the victories in Tennessee are forcing le stronghold. Thus the prospects of another Bull Run battle are dissipated—unless they have, as thher did nothing or else behaved shamefully at Bull Run. At the review yesterday McClellan appeare roost, distributed appointments and favors. Bull Run put Scott's and McDowell's noses out of jointe have been obliged to fall back from the old Bull Run battle-field, where we fought. The enemy are of the conflict was the old battle-ground of Bull Run, with this difference, that we were in the rester John General Meade's body-servant. at Bull Run, on the first day's fighting. He came on a p[2 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
marching in this direction, and, as he expresses it, having the right of way, he moved back to Buckland, and marched thence to Brentsville and to the crossing of Bull Run at Wolf's Run Shoal. Here he crossed on the morning of the 27th, and pushing ahead through Fairfax Court House and Dranesville, striking the Potomac opposite throm Baltimore. It soon disposed of this force, though with the loss of two officers and several men. The head of the column was halted that night (the 29th) at Union Mills, while the column remained strung out between that place and Westminster. Early on June 30 the cavalry was off again, and going by a cross cut reached Hanoveickles was at Emmettsburg. General Hancock was at Uniontown. General Slocum was about a mile beyond Littlestown, on the road to Hanover. General Sykes was at Union Mills. General Sedgwick was within two miles of Manchester. General Gregg, with his division of cavalry, was at Manchester, and General Kilpatrick, with his divisio
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
ntinuing his movement along what is called the Warrenton pike, and that his object was to cross Bull Run and get possession of the heights of Centreville, if possible, thus interposing himself betweenght gave orders for a further retrograde movement, until I occupied the line of Centreville and Bull Run. In performing the movement the next day, I ascertained, when too late to take advantage of itnd succeeded during the night in withdrawing his corps and taking his position upon the line of Bull Run. After occupying this line, and ascertaining that the enemy did not continue his pursuit, asly to return and attack him. But, unfortunately, there came up a very heavy rain, which raised Bull Run so as to render it unfordable; and not anticipating that I should have any occasion to use pontthe Rappahannock, and it was necessary, therefore, either that I should wait for the falling of Bull Run or send back for my bridges, which latter measure I adopted. But by the time the pontoon train
83. Buchanan, James, I, 142, 356. Buell, Don Carlos, I, 248, 260. Buena Vista, battle of, 1847, I, 193. Buford, John, II, 8, 14, 17, 25, 31-33, 35, 36, 45, 53, 54, 60, 65, 71, 113, 126, 130, 153, 323, 326, 368, 378, 379, 384, 389. Bull Run, first battle of, July 21, 1861, I, 232, 248, 259, 260. Bull Run, second battle of, Aug. 28-30, 1862, I, 306, 307, 323. Burling, Geo. C., II, 73, 77, 84. Burns, Gen., I, 289, 293, 294, 296. Burnside, Ambrose E., I, 196, 242, 243, 245Bull Run, second battle of, Aug. 28-30, 1862, I, 306, 307, 323. Burling, Geo. C., II, 73, 77, 84. Burns, Gen., I, 289, 293, 294, 296. Burnside, Ambrose E., I, 196, 242, 243, 245, 303, 304, 309, 322, 323, 325-329, 331-335, 338-342, 344-352, 354, 358-362, 365-367, 384; II, 161, 163, 217-222, 234, 253, 254, 261, 262, 266, 267, 322, 344-349. Burnside, Mrs. Ambrose E., I, 358. Bustamente, Gen., I, 88. Butler, Anthony, I, 4. Butler, Benjamin F., II, 196, 204, 214, 226, 231-233,239-241,247, 248, 253,255, 256, 342, 343. Butler, Margaret Coats, I, 4. Butler, W. O., I, 130, 153, 165, 168, 173, 233. Butterfield, Daniel, I, 329, 332, 339, 341, 342, 351, 352, 3