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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 2 (search)
vance of the army. Since my last letter, Captain Williams, of the corps, has arrived, to act as Chi which case I shall certainly be one, for Captain Williams will remain with General Taylor, and I coe in search of some public property which Captain Williams desired to obtain immediate possession of water, and starts on the first boat; but Captain Williams, preferring to go by land, has obtained hattery of artillery. Of course I go with Captain Williams, and shall therefore leave to-morrow mornch indeed is the case; but the arrival of Captain Williams precludes my having the same position wit ground. Among the officers who fell was Captain Williams, of my corps, who was leading the advance(poor Blake) shot himself; and the third (Captain Williams) fell in the recent operations against Moo far upon his civility, and the death of Captain Williams making me senior, and thus detaching me f Ferry during the Gettysburg campaign. Seth Williams, first lieutenant First Regiment of Artill
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
arters at Haxall's Landing. There, through the kindness of General Seth Williams, who gave up his own tent for the purpose, he was placed onn were then embarking. On repairing to headquarters, I met General Seth Williams and General Porter. They informed me that McCall and Reyno. I have only time to send you a check and to say that I saw Seth Williams, and he says McClellan told him to remind him whenever any reorw him for a few minutes, surrounded by a great crowd; but I saw Seth Williams, who had in his hands Hooker's protest, and seemed quite surprised that Reynolds had left so soon. I told Williams very plainly that I saw no occasion for making such an outcry against Reynolds's removal;much in want of staff officers. He was recommended to me by young Williams, John Worthington Williams, of Philadelphia. on Rickett's staffcamps, and the telegram I only smuggled through the kindness of Seth Williams. I almost forget when I wrote you last, but I think it was on
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
orps. By command of Major General Meade. S. Williams, Asst. Adjt. Gen'l. Headquarters army of hour. By command of Major General Meade. S. Williams, Asst. Adjt. Gen'l. These circulars werands. By command of Major General Meade. S. Williams, Asst. Adjt. Gen'l. Late in the afternooment's notice. Very respectfully, etc., S. Williams, Asst. Adjt. Gen'l. Thus, early in the ld, Maj. General, Chief of Staff. Official: S. Williams, A. A. Gen'l. Hancock at once turned ovld, Maj. General, Chief of Staff. Official: S. Williams, A. A. Gen'l. About the same time that ld, Maj. General, Chief of Staff. Official: S. Williams, A. A. G. At the same time the commandi By command of Major General Meade, (Sd.) S. Williams, Asst. Adjt. General. Addenda to order command of Major General Meade. Official. S. Williams, Asst. Adjt. Gen. Later in the afternoon By Command of Major General Meade, (Sd.) S. Williams, Asst. Adjt. Genl. Immediately upon t[1 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
out of the question. You must not expect to see me till next winter, unless, as before, I am brought home on a litter. Whatever occurs, I shall not voluntarily leave the field. We have had most interesting services to-day by Bishop Whipple, who administered the Holy Communion to quite a number of officers and soldiers, hastily collected from the staff and the detachments on duty at these headquarters. We had afternoon services, and afterwards the bishop and his assistant, with General Seth Williams, dined with me. The bishop brought down with him a magnificent bouquet of flowers, with which our rude altar was adorned. The bishop is a most interesting man, about forty years of age, but full of life and energy. He preached two most appropriate and impressive discourses, well adapted to all classes of his hearers. General Grant went up to Washington to-day, expecting to return to-morrow. You do not do Grant justice, and I am sorry to see it. You do not make a distinction bet
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 7 (search)
d him foremost in all public works, and made his name a household word in all your homes. During the dark days of our Civil War I happened to be in Washington. He telegraphed me to come and celebrate Easter in his camp with the holy communion. It was a strange place for Easter flowers and Easter songs, and the story of the Resurrection, but I do not recall a sweeter service or one more redolent of the peace of heaven. Of the bronzed veterans who knelt beside the Lord's table, some, like Williams and Meade, are sleeping with the dead, others are scattered far and busy in life's work. That day I knew that we had in our camps centurions who feared God and prayed always. The solemn service ended, the congregation rose, while the coffin was borne from the church, followed by the male relations of the general, his intimate personal friends, the President of the United States, the general of the army, and many other distinguished officers both of the army and navy. It was placed,
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 29 (search)
on this point seems to be slightly at fault. He did see General Humphreys on the morning he assumed command of the Army of the Potomac, at Frederick City, and he at that time expressed his desire of appointing him his chief-of-staff, but after discussion it was agreed between them that this officer could be of greater service by retaining command of his division in the Third Corps during the impending battle.—(General Humphreys' testimony before Committee on Conduct of War.) I did ask General Williams to assume the duties in addition to those of adjutant-general, but he declined. I also asked General Warren, then my chief of engineers, to act temporarily as chief-of-staff, but he also declined taking on himself additional duties. Under these circumstances I asked General Butterfield to remain till I had time to make permanent arrangements. On the third day, General Butterfield having been disabled by being struck with a fragment of a spent shell, left the army, and a few days afte
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
duty this hour. By command of Major General Meade: S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant General. Headquarters army of the Pdifferent corps. By command of Major General Meade. S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant General. Headquarters army of the Pe enemy's hands. By command of Major General Meade. S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant General. Headquarters army of the Ph an occurrence. By command of Major General Meade. S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant General. Headquarters army of the Pdrawal from Harrisburg and concentration was received. S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant General. Headquarters army of the Puch direction as may be required at a moment's notice. S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant General. Headquarters army of the P quarter. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant General. Major General H. W. Slocumrters of the commanders. By order of General Meade. S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant General. That was the sum and
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix Y (search)
e Gettysburg. By Command of Maj.-Gen. Meade, S. Williams, Assist. Adjt.-General. This letter, marke Headquarters Sixth Corps, March 10, 1864. Brig.-Gen. S. Williams, Asst. Adjt.-Gen. General: My attentiont. servt., John Newton, Major-Gen. Comdg. Brig.-Gen. S. Williams, A. A. G., Headqrs. A. of P. Headquarteant, A. S. Williams, Brig.-Gen. of Vols. Brig.-General S. Williams, Asst. Adj.-General Army of the Potomac. ted men, Philadelphia, Pa., March 14, 1864. Brig.-Gen. S. Williams, Adjt.-Gen. Army of the Potomac. Generatillery, General Warren, Chief Engineer, and General Seth Williams, Adjutant-General, of the Army of the Potomaand to the disinclination of Generals Warren and Seth Williams to accept the position, through their belief thationed, General Humphreys, General Warren, and General Williams, had been chiefof-staff on the eventful day ofn, Howard, Gibbon, A. S. Williams, Hunt, Warren, Seth Williams; and in sorry contrast, Doubleday, Butterfield,
, II, 147, 164. Wilkes, Charles, I, 234, 239, 240, 381. Wilkeson, Mr., I, 363. Wilkeson, Senator, II, 165, 169, 219. Wilkeson, B., II, 51. Wilkins, Wm., I, 350. Wilkinson, Senator, II, 174, 177, 178, 212. Willard, G. L., II, 87, 88. Willcox, Col., I, 232, 244. Willcox, Gen., I, 324. Williams, A. S., I, 329; II, 55, 56, 64, 65, 88, 90, 91, 93, 95, 98, 163, 304, 409, 410, 415, 419, 422. Williams, J. M., II, 90, 91. Williams, John W., I, 266, 322, 356. Williams, Seth, I, 197, 299, 302, 308, 310, 337; II, 10, 15, 16, 17, 31, 37, 38, 40, 121, 123, 128, 163, 184, 304, 352, 382, 383, 387, 388, 393, 394, 413-415, 420, 422. Williams, W. G., I, 111, 112, 115, 117, 123, 135, 144, 209. Williamsport, Md., July, 1863, II, 134,140, 201, 363, 364, 366, 372. Willings, I, 9. Wilmer, Mr., II, 151. Wilson, Senator, I, 379; II, 161, 165, 256, 257, 343, 344. Winegar, C. E., II, 99. Winslow, G. B., II, 79. Winsor, Harry, I, 384. Wise, Mrs. Henry