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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 50 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Doc. 9.--Major Anderson's movement. We must own that the news of the transaction in Charleston harbor was learned by us yesterday with a prouder beating of the heart. We could not bu feel once more that we had a country--a fact which has been to a certain degree in suspense for some weeks past. What is given up for the momeits position, where its rights exist, and that its officers, civil and military, intend to discharge their duty. The concentration of the disposable force in Charleston harbor in a defensible post, is thus a bond of union. It is a decisive act, calculated to rally the national heart. * * We are not disposed to allow the Union to bders from Washington, but acting on the discretion which an officer in an independent command always possesses. Major Anderson, commander of the defences of Charleston harbor, transports his troops to the key of his position, Fort Sumter, against which no gun can be laid which is not itself commanded by a 10-inch columbiad in the
ance impossible. We came here the representatives of an authority which could, at any time within the past sixty days, have taken possession of the forts in Charleston harbor, but which, upon pledges given in a manner that we cannot doubt, determined to trust to your honor rather than to its own power. Since our arrival here an oalso allege that you came here the representatives of an authority which could, at any time within the past sixty days, have taken possession of the forts in Charleston harbor, but which, upon pledges given in a manner that we (you) cannot doubt, determined to trust to your (my) honor rather than to its power. This brings me to ent would have been on my part, from the nature of my official duties, impossible. The world knows that I have never sent any reinforcements to the forts in Charleston harbor, and I have certainly never authorized any change to be made in their relative military status. Bearing upon this subject, I refer you to an order issued by
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Second letter of the Commissioners to the President. (search)
ion between myself and any human being. In reply to this statement, we are compelled to say, that your conversation with us left upon our minds the distinct impression, that you did seriously contemplate the withdrawal of the troops from Charleston harbor. And in support of this impression, we would add, that we have the positive assurance of gentlemen of the highest possible public reputation and the most unsullied integrity — men whose name and fame, secured by long service and patriotic have avoided the subsequent complications. But, if you had known the acts of the authorities of South Carolina, should that have prevented your keeping your faith? What was the condition of things? For the last sixty days you have had in Charleston harbor, not force enough to hold the forts against an equal enemy. Two of them were empty--one of those two the most important in the harbor. It could have been taken at any time. You ought to know better than any man that it would have been ta
ge of the guns of my fort. In order to save, as far as it is in my power, the shedding of blood, I beg you will take due notification of my decision for the good of all concerned,--hoping, however, your answer may justify a further continuance of forbearance on my part. I remain, respectfully, Robert Anderson. Gov. Pickens' reply. Gov. Pickens, after stating the position of South Carolina towards the United States, says that any attempt to send United States troops into Charleston harbor, to reinforce the forts, would be regarded as an act of hostility; and in conclusion adds, that any attempt to reinforce the troops at Fort Sumter, or to retake and resume possession of the forts within the waters of South Carolina, which Major Anderson abandoned, after spiking the cannon and doing other damage, cannot but be regarded by the authorities of the State as indicative of any other purpose than the coercion of the State by the armed force of the Government; special agents, t
Doc. 50.--the United States fleet at Charleston. The following list embraces the names, with armaments and troops, of the fleet despatched from New York and Washington to Charleston harbor, for the relief of Fort Sumter:-- vessels of war. Steam sloop-of-war Pawnee, Captain S. C. Rowan, 10 guns and 200 men. The Pawnee sailed from Washington, with sealed orders, on the morning of Saturday, April 6. Steam sloop-of-war Powhatan, Captain E. D. Porter, 11 guns and 275 men. The Powhatan sailed from the Brooklyn Navy Yard on Saturday afternoon, April 6. Revenue cutter Harriet Lane, Captain J. Faunce, 5 guns and 96 men. On Saturday, April 6, the Harriet Lane exchanged her revenue flag for the United States navy flag, denoting her transfer to the Government naval service, and sailed suddenly on last Monday morning, with sealed orders. the steam transports. Atlantic, 358 troops, composed of Companies A and M of the Second artillery, Companies C and H of the Second infant
ient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Brigadier-General Commanding. Major Robert Anderson, Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C. Headquarrers, Fort Sumter, S. C. April 11th, 1861. General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Brigadier-General Commanding. Major Robert Anderson, Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C. Headquarters, Fort Sumter, S. C. 2.30 A. M., April 12, 1861. General: I have the honor to acknowledge the rert was bravely defended. It has fallen without loss of life — the ships are on the spot to enforce the blockade of Charleston harbor--Fort Pickens, according to a despatch from Montgomery, has already been reinforced — and every thing is ready for e last five months have been succeeded by a brutal bombardment of a fort erected at vast expense for the defence of Charleston harbor, which would have been peaceably evacuated if the rebels had not insisted upon the utter humiliation of the Governm
Doc. 55.--the feeling in the city of New York. From the first announcement that hostilities had actually commenced in Charleston Harbor, and that Major Anderson's garrison of sixty or seventy men were sustaining and replying as best they could, to a fierce bombardment from a force more than one hundred times their number, down to the moment it was announced that he was compelled to strike his flag, the feeling that stirred the people as one man, here, and so far as we can learn, elsewhere also, was too deep, too strong, and will be too enduring, to be characterized by the term excitement. Never have we seen anything like it. While the keen sagacity of the public mind readily detected the absurdity and downright falsehood of many of the despatches, yet those received on Friday night, created a sharp relish for more; consequently, Saturday morning, all the forenoon, and throughout the whole day, business was forsaken or limited to the briefest necessity. At the Stock Board cheer
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 57.--a proclamation.-by the President of the United States. (search)
openly joining the rash, reckless, despotic, cruel, and villanous band of conspirators, who have formed a deep-laid and desperate plot for its destruction. The contest which is impending will doubtless be attended with many horrors, but all the facts show that it has been forced upon us as a last resort; and war is not the worst of evils. Since the startling events of the last five months have been succeeded by a brutal bombardment of a fort erected at vast expense for the defence of Charleston harbor, which would have been peaceably evacuated if the rebels had not insisted upon the utter humiliation of the Government; and since the Secretary of War of the Southern Confederacy has threatened to capture Washington, and even to invade the Northern States, while a formal declaration of hostilities is about to be made by the Confederate Congress,--we should be wanting in every element of manhood, be perpetually disgraced in the eyes of the world, and lose all self-respect, if we did not
e of our Southern population it is my solemn conviction that there is some danger of an early act of rashness preliminary to secession, viz., the seizure of some or all of the following posts: Forts Jackson and St. Philip in the Mississippi, below New Orleans, both without garrisons; Fort Morgan, below Mobile, without a garrison; Forts Pickens and McRea, Pensacola harbor, with an insufficient garrison for one; Fort Pulaski, below Savannah, without a garrison; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, the former with an insufficient garrison, and the latter without any; and Fort Monroe, Hampton roads, without a sufficient garrison. In my opinion all these works should be immediately so garrisoned as to make any attempt to take any one of them, by surprise or coup de main, ridiculous. With the army faithful to its allegiance, and the navy probably equally so, and with a Federal Executive, for the next twelve months, of firmness and moderation,which the country has a right to exp
volunteers. Maxcy Gregg, Colonel; D. H. Hamilton, Lieutenant-Colonel; Augustus M. Smith, Major. The regiment is composed of the Richland Rifles, of Columbia, Capt. Miller; Darlington Guards, Capt. McIntosh; Edgefield Rifles, Capt. Dean; Union District Volunteers, Capt. Gadberry; Edgefield Guards, Capt. Merriweather; Monticello Guards, Capt. Davis; Rhett Guards, of Newberry, Capt. Walker; and Richardson Guards, of Charleston, Capt. Axson. All of these troops were on service in Charleston harbor during the late bombardment, but freely and enthusiastically accepted service in the campaign opening on the banks of the Potomac, without visiting their homes. Before leaving, the ladies of Charleston presented them a new flag, which the Courier describes as follows: It is made of blue silk, with silk tassels, the staff surmounted by a golden cross. On one side is the Palmetto tree, elegantly worked with white floss silk. An oak vine, of the same beautiful texture, surrounds the
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