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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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not have been made. The greater number of the contracting parties held slaves, and they had previously evinced their estimate of the value of such a stipulation by making it a condition in the Ordinance for the government of the territory ceded by Virginia, which obligations, and the laws of the General Government, have ceased to effect the objects of the Constitution. The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa, have enacted laws which either nullify the acts of Congress, or render useless any attempt to execute them. In many of these States the fugitive is discharged from the service of labor claimed, and in none of them has the State Government complied with the stipulation made in the Constitution. The State of New Jersey, at an early day, passed a law in conformity with her constitutional obligation ; but the current of Anti-Slavery feeling has led her more rec
--pitiful states, unable to stand alone. No, gentlemen, republican states are like the sheaves in the harvest field. Put them up singly, and every gust blows them down; stack them together, and they defy all the winds of heaven. [Tumultuous applause.] And so you have seen that these thirteen republican states all came to the conviction, each of them that it could not stand alone; and the thirteen came together, and you have seen other states added to them. The state of Michigan, the state of Indiana; of Illinois, the state of Wisconsin, the state of Iowa and the state of Louisiana--what under heaven kept each of these states from setting up for itself and becoming independent? Nothing, but that it could not stand alone. And they are ready to be united to other republican states on this continent. So it was with Texas. She was independent. Why did she not remain so? You know how much it tried us to admit her into the Union; but it tried her much harder to stay out as long as s
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 57.--a proclamation.-by the President of the United States. (search)
istered to every officer and man. The mustering officers will be instructed to receive no man under the rank of commissioned officer, who is in years apparently over 45 or under 18, or who is not in physical strength and vigor. The quota for each State is as follows: Maine1 New Hampshire1 Vermont1 Massachusetts2 Rhode Island1 Connecticut1 New York17 New Jersey4 Pennsylvania16 Delaware1 Tennessee2 Maryland4 Virginia3 North Carolina2 Kentucky4 Arkansas1 Missouri4 Ohio13 Indiana6 Illinois6 Michigan1 Iowa1 Minnesota1 Wisconsin1 It is ordered that each regiment shall consist, on an aggregate of officers and men, of 780. The total thus to be called out is 73,391. The remainder to constitute the 75,000 men under the President's proclamation will be composed of troops in the District of Columbia.--World and N. Y. Times. Opinions of the press. To the simple, dignified, calm, but firm Proclamation of the President of the United States, the loyal Stat
Presidents Lincoln and Davis couldn't settle the etiquette upon which the troops were to be withdrawn from Fort Sumter. Kentucky is a State in this matter, on the border of the Ohio, with six or seven hundred miles of coast bordering upon Ohio, Indiana and Illinois--States with whom we have ever lived in peace and good fellowship. We have no quarrel with them, and they must have none with us. We have asked the South to stay their hands, for we had a great stake in this Government, and they ha How are you to defend yourself if you go out of the Union? If you do, you at once declare war against the Union--you oppose the Stars and Stripes. We have a million of white population resident in a State only separated by the Ohio River from Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio, with a population of five millions. Through each State are numerous railroads, able to transport an army in a few days to our doors. What roads have we but those to Nashville and Lexington? And what can we do with them?
rth of those lines would, beyond a doubt, in about the same time, constitute another Confederacy, with its capital at probably Alton or Quincy, Illinois. The boundaries of the Pacific Union are the most definite of all, and the remaining States would constitute the Northeast Confederacy, with its capital at Albany. It, at the first thought, will be considered strange that seven Slaveholding States and parts of Virginia and Florida should be placed (above) in a new Confederacy with Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, &c; but when the overwhelming weight of the great Northwest is taken in connection with the laws of trade, contiguity of territory, and the comparative indifference to freesoil doctrines on the part of Western Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri, it is evident that but little if any coercion, beyond moral force, would be needed to embrace them; and I have omitted the temptation of the unwasted public lands which would fall entire to this Confederacy — an appanage (well hu
Had the Government given up these forts, convened Congress and urged upon that body the imperative necessity of calling a National Convention for the purpose of a peaceable settlement of our difficulties, we believe the whole thing might have been settled without a resort to arms. Our prayer is that peace between the sections may be speedily restored. If the South won't live with us as a united people, then by all means let us live in harmony as two separate nations. The Witness, of Indiana, says:--After months of indignities borne by our Government from some of the Southern States--after she had endured dishonor and afflictions which need not be repeated, for they are fresh in every mind, she is now hunted by armed troops, the men of her own raising, and arms of her own making, and with them she is fiercely threatened to be stabbed, nay, perhaps is stabbed at this very writing to her heart! But, thank Heaven, she is not dead, nor is she mortally wounded! The United States o
.10,000 Damariscotta, Me.3,000 Elizabeth, N. J.11,000 Elkhart, Ind.8,000 Erie, Pa.25,000 Evansville, Ind.15,000 Fall River, Mass.10,000 Flemington, N. J.5,000 Fond du Lac, Wis.4,000 Gloucester, Mass.10,000 Glen Falls, N. Y.10,000 Great Falls, N. H.10,000 Greensburg, Ind.2,000 Georgetown, Mass.5,000 Galena, Ill.1,000 Hudson, N. Y .4,000 Hamilton, Ohio.1,000 Hoboken, N. J.2,000 Hornellsville, N. Y.1,000 Hartford, Conn.64.000 Harrisburg, Pa.5,000 Illinois, State.2,000,000 Indiana, State.1,000,000 Iowa, State.100,000 Ithaca, N. Y.10,000 Indianapolis, Ind.5,000 Ipswich, Mass.4,000 Jersey City, N. J.32,000 Janesville, Wis.6,000 Kenton, Ohio.2,000 Keene, N. H.10,000 Lynn, Mass.10,000 Lockport, N. Y.2,000 Lawrence, Mass.5,000 Lowell, Mass.8,000 London, Ohio.1,000 Lancaster, Pa.5,000 Lebanon County, Pa.10,000 Maine, State.1,300,000 Michigan, various pl's.50,000 Milwaukee, Wis.31,000 Marblehead, Mass.5,000 Malden, Mass.2,000 Madison, Ind.6,000 Mount H
Doc. 158.-Apportionment of troops. The following is the number of infantry regiments to be received from each State for a total increase of seventy-five regiments of three years volunteers, under the recent determination of the Government, viz: Virginia2 Maine1 Maryland1 Connecticut1 New Hampshire1 Vermont1 Rhode Island1 Minnesota1 Delaware1 Kansas1 Nebraska1 District of Columbia1 New York11 Pennsylvania10 Ohio9 Illinois6 Indiana4 Massachusetts5 Missouri4 Kentucky2 Wisconsin2 Michigan3 Iowa2 New Jersey3 The other regiment, namely, of cavalry, is not assigned.--N. Y. Herald, May 13.