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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 94 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 36 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Iowa (Iowa, United States) or search for Iowa (Iowa, United States) in all documents.

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the laws of the General Government, have ceased to effect the objects of the Constitution. The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa, have enacted laws which either nullify the acts of Congress, or render useless any attempt to execute them. In many of these States the fugitive is discharged from the service of labor claimed, and in none of them has the State Government complier more recently to enact laws which render inoperative the remedies provided by her own laws and by the laws of Congress. In the State of New York even the right of transit for a slave has been denied by her tribunals; and the States of Ohio and Iowa have refused to surrender to justice fugitives charged with murder, and with inciting servile insurrection in the State of Virginia. Thus the constitutional compact has been deliberately broken and disregarded by the non-slaveholding States; and
epublican states are like the sheaves in the harvest field. Put them up singly, and every gust blows them down; stack them together, and they defy all the winds of heaven. [Tumultuous applause.] And so you have seen that these thirteen republican states all came to the conviction, each of them that it could not stand alone; and the thirteen came together, and you have seen other states added to them. The state of Michigan, the state of Indiana; of Illinois, the state of Wisconsin, the state of Iowa and the state of Louisiana--what under heaven kept each of these states from setting up for itself and becoming independent? Nothing, but that it could not stand alone. And they are ready to be united to other republican states on this continent. So it was with Texas. She was independent. Why did she not remain so? You know how much it tried us to admit her into the Union; but it tried her much harder to stay out as long as she did. Why is not Kansas content to remain out? Simply
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 57.--a proclamation.-by the President of the United States. (search)
an. The mustering officers will be instructed to receive no man under the rank of commissioned officer, who is in years apparently over 45 or under 18, or who is not in physical strength and vigor. The quota for each State is as follows: Maine1 New Hampshire1 Vermont1 Massachusetts2 Rhode Island1 Connecticut1 New York17 New Jersey4 Pennsylvania16 Delaware1 Tennessee2 Maryland4 Virginia3 North Carolina2 Kentucky4 Arkansas1 Missouri4 Ohio13 Indiana6 Illinois6 Michigan1 Iowa1 Minnesota1 Wisconsin1 It is ordered that each regiment shall consist, on an aggregate of officers and men, of 780. The total thus to be called out is 73,391. The remainder to constitute the 75,000 men under the President's proclamation will be composed of troops in the District of Columbia.--World and N. Y. Times. Opinions of the press. To the simple, dignified, calm, but firm Proclamation of the President of the United States, the loyal States of this Union will respond,
he ordinary mass, rushing from mere enthusiasm to A battle whose great aim and scope They little care to know, Content like men at arms to cope, Each with his fronting foe. Behind that class stands another, whose only idea in this controversy is sovereignty and the flag. The seaboard, the wealth, the just-converted hunkerism of the country, fill that class. Next to it stands the third element, the people; the cordwainers of Lynn, the farmer of Worcester, the dwellers on the prairie--Iowa and Wisconsin, Ohio and Maine--the broad surface of the people who have no leisure for technicalities, who never studied law, who never had time to read any further into the Constitution than the first two lines--Establish Justice and secure Liberty. They have waited long enough; they have eaten dirt enough; they have apologized for bankrupt statesmen enough; they have quieted their consciences enough; they have split logic with their abolition neighbors long enough; they are tired of trying
e.3,000 Elizabeth, N. J.11,000 Elkhart, Ind.8,000 Erie, Pa.25,000 Evansville, Ind.15,000 Fall River, Mass.10,000 Flemington, N. J.5,000 Fond du Lac, Wis.4,000 Gloucester, Mass.10,000 Glen Falls, N. Y.10,000 Great Falls, N. H.10,000 Greensburg, Ind.2,000 Georgetown, Mass.5,000 Galena, Ill.1,000 Hudson, N. Y .4,000 Hamilton, Ohio.1,000 Hoboken, N. J.2,000 Hornellsville, N. Y.1,000 Hartford, Conn.64.000 Harrisburg, Pa.5,000 Illinois, State.2,000,000 Indiana, State.1,000,000 Iowa, State.100,000 Ithaca, N. Y.10,000 Indianapolis, Ind.5,000 Ipswich, Mass.4,000 Jersey City, N. J.32,000 Janesville, Wis.6,000 Kenton, Ohio.2,000 Keene, N. H.10,000 Lynn, Mass.10,000 Lockport, N. Y.2,000 Lawrence, Mass.5,000 Lowell, Mass.8,000 London, Ohio.1,000 Lancaster, Pa.5,000 Lebanon County, Pa.10,000 Maine, State.1,300,000 Michigan, various pl's.50,000 Milwaukee, Wis.31,000 Marblehead, Mass.5,000 Malden, Mass.2,000 Madison, Ind.6,000 Mount Holly, N. J.3,000 Morrist
Doc. 158.-Apportionment of troops. The following is the number of infantry regiments to be received from each State for a total increase of seventy-five regiments of three years volunteers, under the recent determination of the Government, viz: Virginia2 Maine1 Maryland1 Connecticut1 New Hampshire1 Vermont1 Rhode Island1 Minnesota1 Delaware1 Kansas1 Nebraska1 District of Columbia1 New York11 Pennsylvania10 Ohio9 Illinois6 Indiana4 Massachusetts5 Missouri4 Kentucky2 Wisconsin2 Michigan3 Iowa2 New Jersey3 The other regiment, namely, of cavalry, is not assigned.--N. Y. Herald, May 13.
and forming an Alpine boundary to divide the sections. On the contrary, the Father of waters stretches out his great arms to the East and to the West, bearing on his bosom to the Gulf the generous products of the valleys which they fertilize, and carrying back in their place the cotton, rice, and sugar of our Southern borders, and imports from foreign climes. The Mississippi, source and channel of prosperity to North and South alike in every mile of its progress; on the West to Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana; on the East to Wisconsin, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississippi, proclaims to the citizens of the immense region which it waters through thousands of miles in extent, from North to South, and East to West, that our country is one and indivisible. Our duty to the South forbids our acquiescence in this rebellion, for it would reverse the American policy for the last half century, and reconsign to foreign invasion, to anarchy and ruin, the immense
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 257.-General Lyon's proclamation. (search)
ing the pledge of the State authorities to co-operate in preserving the peace of Missouri, loyal citizens in great numbers continue to be driven from their homes. It is immaterial whether these outrages continue from inactivity or indisposition on the part of the State authorities to prevent them. It is enough that they continue, and it will devolve on you the duty of putting a stop to them summarily by the force under your command, to be aided by such troops as you may require from Kansas, Iowa, and Illinois. The professions of loyalty to the Union by the State authorities of Missouri are not to be relied upon. They have already falsified their professions too often, and are too far committed to secession to be admitted to your confidence, and you can only be sure of their desisting from their wicked purposes when it is not in their power to prosecute them. You will, therefore, be unceasingly watchful of their movements, and not permit the clamors of the partisans and opponents o