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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 891 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 266 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 146 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 138 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 132 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 122 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 120 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 106 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 78 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ohio (Ohio, United States) or search for Ohio (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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, and in none of them has the State Government complied with the stipulation made in the Constitution. The State of New Jersey, at an early day, passed a law in conformity with her constitutional obligation ; but the current of Anti-Slavery feeling has led her more recently to enact laws which render inoperative the remedies provided by her own laws and by the laws of Congress. In the State of New York even the right of transit for a slave has been denied by her tribunals; and the States of Ohio and Iowa have refused to surrender to justice fugitives charged with murder, and with inciting servile insurrection in the State of Virginia. Thus the constitutional compact has been deliberately broken and disregarded by the non-slaveholding States; and the consequence follows that South Carolina is released from her obligation. The ends for which this Constitution was framed are declared by itself to be to form a more perfect union, to establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, pr
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 57.--a proclamation.-by the President of the United States. (search)
l be administered to every officer and man. The mustering officers will be instructed to receive no man under the rank of commissioned officer, who is in years apparently over 45 or under 18, or who is not in physical strength and vigor. The quota for each State is as follows: Maine1 New Hampshire1 Vermont1 Massachusetts2 Rhode Island1 Connecticut1 New York17 New Jersey4 Pennsylvania16 Delaware1 Tennessee2 Maryland4 Virginia3 North Carolina2 Kentucky4 Arkansas1 Missouri4 Ohio13 Indiana6 Illinois6 Michigan1 Iowa1 Minnesota1 Wisconsin1 It is ordered that each regiment shall consist, on an aggregate of officers and men, of 780. The total thus to be called out is 73,391. The remainder to constitute the 75,000 men under the President's proclamation will be composed of troops in the District of Columbia.--World and N. Y. Times. Opinions of the press. To the simple, dignified, calm, but firm Proclamation of the President of the United States, the l
roops were to be withdrawn from Fort Sumter. Kentucky is a State in this matter, on the border of the Ohio, with six or seven hundred miles of coast bordering upon Ohio, Indiana and Illinois--States with whom we have ever lived in peace and good fellowship. We have no quarrel with them, and they must have none with us. We have asf consanguinity; but she must realize the fact that if Kentucky separates from the Federal Union and assumes her sovereign powers as an independent State, that Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, remaining loyal to the Federal Union, must become her political antagonists. If Kentucky deserts the Stars and Stripes, and those States adherehe Union--you oppose the Stars and Stripes. We have a million of white population resident in a State only separated by the Ohio River from Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio, with a population of five millions. Through each State are numerous railroads, able to transport an army in a few days to our doors. What roads have we but thos
ns who may fall in the defence of the Union. Speech of Hon. R. C. Schenck, of Ohio. men of New York — Let me inform you that I meet you here to-day, as it were,your company, I feel at home — yes, perfectly at home. (Loud cheers.) I live in Ohio; but it is not New York or Ohio we are now trying — that is not the question — tOhio we are now trying — that is not the question — that is not the subject which has brought us together this day. The great question — the vitally important question — which we have to consider is, whether we are citi we can all stand together! (Hear and cheers.) I am about to return to the State of Ohio, or the State they call Buckeye. (Loud laughter.) I have not time to say m I love my native State, as you love your native State. I love my adopted State of Ohio, as you love your adopted State, if such you have; but, my friends, I am noll the States be a help and a guide to each State? Louisiana's sugar drops into Ohio's tea-cup; and should not every palace built on Fifth-avenue nod its he
Doc. 78.-where Gen. Scott stands. In the course of a speech delivered in Ohio Senator Douglas said: Gentlemen, I have been requested by so many different ones to make a statement in response to the inquiries that are propounded to me, that I do so as a matter of justice to an eminent patriot. I have been asked whether there is any truth in the rumor that Gen. Scott was about to retire from the American army. It is almost profanity to ask that question. (Good, good, and three chtes would constitute the Northeast Confederacy, with its capital at Albany. It, at the first thought, will be considered strange that seven Slaveholding States and parts of Virginia and Florida should be placed (above) in a new Confederacy with Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, &c; but when the overwhelming weight of the great Northwest is taken in connection with the laws of trade, contiguity of territory, and the comparative indifference to freesoil doctrines on the part of Western Virginia, Kentuck
shing from mere enthusiasm to A battle whose great aim and scope They little care to know, Content like men at arms to cope, Each with his fronting foe. Behind that class stands another, whose only idea in this controversy is sovereignty and the flag. The seaboard, the wealth, the just-converted hunkerism of the country, fill that class. Next to it stands the third element, the people; the cordwainers of Lynn, the farmer of Worcester, the dwellers on the prairie--Iowa and Wisconsin, Ohio and Maine--the broad surface of the people who have no leisure for technicalities, who never studied law, who never had time to read any further into the Constitution than the first two lines--Establish Justice and secure Liberty. They have waited long enough; they have eaten dirt enough; they have apologized for bankrupt statesmen enough; they have quieted their consciences enough; they have split logic with their abolition neighbors long enough; they are tired of trying to find a place bet
in the North appears to be settling down into a determination to support the war measures of the Lincoln Administration. Among the journals which still resist the tremendous pressure of fanaticism, and denounce the insane policy of the coercionists, the Bulletin mentions the Bangor Union, and the Argus, Maine; the New York Daily News and New York Day Book, and the Greensburg (Pa.) Democrat. We believe the Boston Courier might be added to the list, and perhaps Medary's paper, the Crisis, in Ohio. Of course the opposition of these journals is utterly incapable of checking or modifying the war current in the North. Nothing can do that but some terrible reverse to the Northern arms. Nothing but downright force and physical terror can achieve a moral triumph over the brutal instincts of fanaticism. The N. O. Crescent, referring to an article in the Toronto (Canada) Leader, observes: The Leader says it is too late now for the North to adopt the only statesmanlike policy — to reco
Ithaca, N. Y.10,000 Indianapolis, Ind.5,000 Ipswich, Mass.4,000 Jersey City, N. J.32,000 Janesville, Wis.6,000 Kenton, Ohio.2,000 Keene, N. H.10,000 Lynn, Mass.10,000 Lockport, N. Y.2,000 Lawrence, Mass.5,000 Lowell, Mass.8,000 London, Ohio.1,000 Lancaster, Pa.5,000 Lebanon County, Pa.10,000 Maine, State.1,300,000 Michigan, various pl's.50,000 Milwaukee, Wis.31,000 Marblehead, Mass.5,000 Malden, Mass.2,000 Madison, Ind.6,000 Mount Holly, N. J.3,000 Morristown, N. J.3,000 Mrk, N. J.$136,000 New Haven, Ct.30,000 Norwich, Ct.13,000 New London, Ct.10,000 New Brunswick, N. J.2,000 Needham, Mass.3,000 Newtown, Mass.3,000 N. Andover, Mass.3,000 Noblesville, Ind.10,000 Newbury, Mass.3,000 Newburyport, Mass.4,000 Ohio, State.3,000,000 Oswego, N. Y.13,000 Ottowa, Ill.18,000 Pennsylvania, State.3,500,000 Philadelphia380,000 Plymouth, Mass.2,000 Poughkeepsie, N. Y.10,000 Piqua, Ohio.20,000 Paterson, N. J.10,000 Portland, Me.31,000 Princeton, N. J.2,000
vy-Yard at Norfolk, which guards the entrance to Chesapeake Bay; of Harper's Ferry, which commands one of the great highways from the Ohio River to the Atlantic Ocean; and, above all, of the mouth of the Mississippi, the outlet of the most extensive system of internal communication on the face of the globe. There will, in my judgment, never be peace, till the flag of the Union again floats from every stronghold from which it has been stricken down. Do you think, fellow-citizens, that Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois will allow their most direct communication with the seaboard to be obstructed, at the pleasure of an alien State, at Harper's Ferry? Do you imagine that Eastern Pennsylvania and Southern New York, whose tributary waters flow through the Susquehanna into Chesapeake Bay, to say nothing of the Delaware and Chesapeake Canal, will tolerate a foreign master in Hampton Roads? Above all, do you believe that the Giant of the West will accept his pathway to the Gulf of Mexico as a
and laws, is perjured if lie yields the Constitution and laws to armed rebellion without a struggle. He knows nothing of States. Within the sphere of the United States Government he deals with individuals only, citizens of the great Republic in whatever portion of it they may happen to live. He has no choice but to enforce the laws of the Republic wherever they may be resisted. When he is overpowered the Government ceases to exist. The Union is gone, and Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Ohio are as much separated from each other as they are from Georgia or Louisiana. Anarchy has returned upon us. The dismemberment of the Commonwealth is complete. We are again in the chaos of 1785. But it is sometimes asked why the Constitution did not make a special provision against the right of secession. How could it do so? The people created a Constitution over the whole land, with certain defined, accurately enumerated powers, and among these were all the chief attributes of sovereign
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