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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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dependence of the Colonies in the following terms: Article 1. His Britannic Majesty acknowledges the said United States, viz.: New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, to be free, Soveireign, and Indiependent States; that lie treaty with them as such; and, for himself, his heirs and successors, relinquishes all claims to the governmenhe territory ceded by Virginia, which obligations, and the laws of the General Government, have ceased to effect the objects of the Constitution. The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa, have enacted laws which either nullify the acts of Congress, or render useless any attempt to execute them. In many of these States the fugitive is discharged from the service of labor claime
d not anticipate the Express last Monday morning, by saying that I met Thurlow Weed in the cars. [Laughter.] A voice--What did he say? Mr. Seward--There the Yankee comes out at once. A gentleman asks me what hoe said. Now I am not a Yankee. There is no New England blood in me, and I do not answer impertinent questions. [Laughter.] I will not tell what he said to me. I will only tell what I said to him, and that was that I repudiated — all compromises whatsoever, which New York, Pennsylvania, and New England could not stand upon. I learned from him that he had been in Springfield, in the State of Illinois. I suppose you would all like to know what he told me he learned there. [Laughter, and shouts of Yes. ] I will give you the best satisfaction I can. He prints a newspaper called the Evening Journal. He is a man of truth, I believe ; and if he is, and wants to tell what he learned, you can get it in his newspaper. [Laughter.] But I have somehow got off from the direct cou
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 57.--a proclamation.-by the President of the United States. (search)
who is in years apparently over 45 or under 18, or who is not in physical strength and vigor. The quota for each State is as follows: Maine1 New Hampshire1 Vermont1 Massachusetts2 Rhode Island1 Connecticut1 New York17 New Jersey4 Pennsylvania16 Delaware1 Tennessee2 Maryland4 Virginia3 North Carolina2 Kentucky4 Arkansas1 Missouri4 Ohio13 Indiana6 Illinois6 Michigan1 Iowa1 Minnesota1 Wisconsin1 It is ordered that each regiment shall consist, on an aggregate of offceforth. The President has issued his proclamation calling out 75,000 men to put down the rebellion, and convening Congress on the Fourth of July. Gov. Morgan of this State, will at once call out a contingent of 25,000 men, and Gov. Curtin of Pennsylvania will do the same. New regiments are already forming rapidly, in anticipation of the proclamation. N. Y. Sun. It is now for the people of New England, especially, and of the great North-West, who have so earnestly demanded a vigorous pol
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 62.--Lieut. Jones' official report. (search)
Doc. 62.--Lieut. Jones' official report. Carlisle barracks, Pa., April 20, 1861. The Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Army, Washington, D. C.: Sir: Immediately after finishing my despatch of the night of the 18th inst., I received positive and reliable information that 2,500 or 3,000 State troops would reach Harper's Ferry in two hours, from Winchester, and that the troops from Halltown, increased to 300, were advancing, and even at that time — a few minutes after 10 o'clock--within 20 minutes march of the Ferry. Under these circumstances, I decided the time had arrived to carry out my determination, as expressed in the despatch above referred to, and accordingly gave the order to apply the torch. In three minutes, or less, both of the Arsenal buildings, containing nearly 15,000 stand of arms, together with the carpenters' shop, which was at the upper end of a long and connected series of workshops of the Armory proper, were in a complete blaze. There is every r
Doc. 68--General orders--no. 3. Headquarters of the army, Washington, April 19, 1861. The Military Department of Washington is extended so as to include, in addition to the District of Columbia and Maryland, the States of Delaware and Pennsylvania, and will be commanded by Major-Gen. Patterson, belonging to the volunteers of the latter State. The Major-General will, as fast as they are mustered into service, post the volunteers of Pennsylvania all along the railroad from Wilmington, be commanded by Major-Gen. Patterson, belonging to the volunteers of the latter State. The Major-General will, as fast as they are mustered into service, post the volunteers of Pennsylvania all along the railroad from Wilmington, Del., to Washington City, in sufficient numbers and in such proximity as may give a reasonable protection to the lines of parallel wires, to the road, its rails, bridges, cars and stations. By command: Winfield Scott. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General.
Government and a common glory, to which both are subject and both should love. Does not each State belong to all the States, and should not all the States be a help and a guide to each State? Louisiana's sugar drops into Ohio's tea-cup; and should not every palace built on Fifth-avenue nod its head amicably to whatever cotton receipts its bills? Over-pride of locality has been the scourge of our nationality. When our thirty-one stars broke on the north star, did not Texas, as well as Pennsylvania, light up the bleak Arctic sky? When the old flag first rose over the untouched gold of California, did not Georgia and New York join hands in unveiling the tempting ore? Virginia has seceded and carried my political fathers with it — Washington and Jefferson. The State has allowed their tombs to crumble, as well as their principles. Outlaw their sod! Who will dare to ask me for my passport at the grave of Washington? Speech of Frederic Kapp. If I understand you rightly, Mr. Pr
All Portsmouth and Norfolk were thoroughly aroused by the arrival of the Pawnee. They did not expect her, and were not prepared for her. They were seized with trepidation, thinking, perhaps, she had come, and along with the Cumberland and Pennsylvania, meant to bombard the towns for having obstructed the channel, and for having, the night before, rifled the United States magazine, just below Norfolk, of about 4,000 kegs of powder. Being utterly defenceless and quite terrified, the Secessioct was done by Gov. Letcher's order; and the despatch to Richmond, announcing the execution of the scheme, exultingly proclaimed: Thus have we secured for Virginia three of the best ships of the Navy --alluding to the Cumberland, Merrimac, and Pennsylvania. But they have lost all, and ten millions of dollars' worth of property besides. The Cumberland has been piloted successfully between the seven sunken vessels, and now floats proudly in front of Fort Monroe, with her great war guns thrust
wars to a successful conclusion, but that we are able also to perform the far more difficult task of suppressing rebellion within our limits. (Loud cheers.) On this question we are a united people, from the southern boundary of my native State of Pennsylvania, to the lakes of the North, and within these latitudes from the Atlantic to the Pacific. There are no two parties here to-day. There is but one party — the party for the Union, which proclaims with one voice its stern determination toged in fighting the hydra of secession and disunion, and contended for the maintenance and perpetuation of the Union. The first was when South Carolina proceeded to nullify the laws of Congress in 1832, and secede from the Union. A native of Pennsylvania, he had emigrated to the State of Mississippi, and during three years le fought in that contest against nullification and secession, until (on the 8th of January, 1836) he was elected by the Union Jackson Democratic Party of Mississippi to the
re the ravages had extended, the wind turned! The winds of Heaven turned, and stayed the spread of the devouring element. The same wind that kind Heaven sent to keep off the fleet at Charleston till Sumter was reduced, came to the relief of Norfolk at the critical moment. Providence was signally on our side. They attempted to blow up the Dock, the most expensive one on the continent — but there was a break in the train they had laid, and it failed. They attempted to burn down the old Pennsylvania, Germantown, and the Merrimac. They set the match, while they endeavored to get out of the way of their intended destruction; but the vessels sunk before the fire caught — another remarkable instance of the interposition of Providence on our behalf, and the strongest evidence of our rectitude. We were right at first, are right now, and shall keep ourselves right to the end. What is to take place before the end, I know not. A threatening war is upon us, made by those who have no regard
lanations were exchanged between the undersigned and the Secretary of War and Secretary of State, who were present and participated in the discussion, as to the facts and circumstances rendered necessary by the extraordinary incidents accompanying the passage of the federal troops through Maryland en route to the city of Washington, and especially in reference to these acts of the authorities of the city of Baltimore, which arrested the progress of the troops by the railroads leading from Pennsylvania and Delaware into Maryland, and of the opposition to the landing of the troops subsequently at Annapolis by the Governor of the State, and in conjunction with the action of the authorities of the State. The hostile feeling manifested by the people to the passage of these troops through Maryland was considered and treated with entire frankness by the undersigned, who, while acknowledging all the legal obligations of the State to the Federal Government, set forth fully the strength of the
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