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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Doc. 2.--secession Ordinance of South Carolina. An Ordinance to Dissolve the Union between the State of South Carolina and other States united with her under the compact entitled the Constitut of America: We, the people of the State of South Carolina, in Convention assembled, do declare and that the union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States under the name of the Unirt nor Postmaster now within the limits of South Carolina. What you have done to-day has extinguished the authority of every man in South Carolina deriving authority from the General Government. I ahe General Government. Mr. Gregg--After South Carolina abrogated the Constitution of the United Ssubject of the collection of the duties in South Carolina now. We have now accomplished the work afthe dignity, honor, and welfare of the State of South Carolina. We must keep the wheels of the Govels let the present contracts be assumed by South Carolina instead of the United States. Mr. Rhett
-Declaration of causes which induced the, secession of South Carolina. The people of the State of South Carolina in ConveState of South Carolina in Convention assembled, on the 2d (lay of April, A. D. 1852, declared that the frequent violations of the Constitution of the Unitedfor-bearance ceases to be a virtue. And now the State of South Carolina having resumed her separate and equal place among ylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, to be free, Soveireign, and Indiependent respectively, or to the people. On the 23d May, 1788, South Carolina, by a Convention of her people, passed an ordinance as-slaveholding States; and the consequence follows that South Carolina is released from her obligation. The ends for whicheous religious belief. We, therefore, the people of South Carolina, by our delegates in Convention assembled, appealing tStates of North America is dissolved, and that the State of South Carolina has resumed her position among the nations of the
ees invented confederation. The people of South Carolina have invented secession. The wisdom of th the system that already exists. The State of South Carolina desires to go out. Just at this momenhis continent shall be united in one. Let South Carolina, let Alabama, let Louisiana--let any otheris is, that whether it is Massachusetts or South Carolina, or whether it is New York or Florida, it which I like half so well as I do the state of South Carolina--[cheers]--neither England, nor Irela Turkey they sent me Arab horses, and from South Carolina they send me nothing but curses. Still, I like South Carolina better than I like any of them ; and I have the presumption and vanity to belie if there were nobody to overhear the state of South Carolina when she is talking, she would confesr the Emperor of Austria, all the hills of South Carolina would pour forth their population for the of those powers were to make a descent on South Carolina, I know who would go to her rescue. [A vo[1 more...]
Doc. 6.--letter of South Carolina. Congressmen to the speaker of the House of Representatives. Sir: We avail ourselves of the earliest opportunity since the official communication of the intelligence, of making known to your honorable body that the people of the State of South Carolina, in their sovereign capacity, have resumed the powers heretofore delegated by them to the Federal Government of the United States, and have thereby dissolved our connection within the House of RepreseutativState of South Carolina, in their sovereign capacity, have resumed the powers heretofore delegated by them to the Federal Government of the United States, and have thereby dissolved our connection within the House of Represeutatives. In talking leave of those with whom we have been associated in a common agency, we, as well as the people of our Commonwealth, desire to do so with a feeling of mutual regard and respect for each other — cherishing the hope that in our future relations we may better enjoy that peace and harmony essential to the happiness of a free and enlightened people. Dec. 24. John McQueen, M. L. Bonham, W. W. Boyce, J. D. Ashmore, To the speaker of the House of Representatives
given up for the moment is of no consequence, provided the one point, stands out clear, that the United States means to maintain its position, where its rights exist, and that its officers, civil and military, intend to discharge their duty. The concentration of the disposable force in Charleston harbor in a defensible post, is thus a bond of union. It is a decisive act, calculated to rally the national heart. * * We are not disposed to allow the Union to be broken up for grievances of South Carolina, which might be settled within the Union; and if there is to be any fighting, we prefer it within, rather than without. The abandonment of Fort Moultrie was obviously a necessary act, in order to carry into effect the purpose contemplated with such an inferior force as that under the command of Major Anderson.--Boston Courier. If anybody ever doubted Major Anderson's eminent military capacity, that doubt must be dispelled by the news that we publish in another column. Of his own acc
ent but one remedy is now left us by which to vindicate our honor and prevent civil war. It is in vain now to hope for confidence on the part of the people of South Carolina in any further pledges as to the action of the military. One remedy is left, and that is to withdraw the garrison from the harbor of Charleston. I hope the dered the honor of the Administration pledged to maintain the troops in the position they occupied, for such had been the assurances given to the gentlemen of South Carolina who had a right to speak for her. South Carolina, on the other hand, gave reciprocal pledges that no force should be brought by them against the troops or agaSouth Carolina, on the other hand, gave reciprocal pledges that no force should be brought by them against the troops or against the property of the United States. The sole object of both parties in these reciprocal pledges was to prevent a collision and the effusion of blood, in the hope that some means might be found for a peaceful accommodation of the existing troubles, the two Houses of Congress having both raised Committees looking to that object
e Commissioners appointed by the rebels of South Carolina to negotiate for the public property in thssession of this fort, the independence of South Carolina will only be in name and not in fact. If, however, it should be surrendered to South Carolina, which I do not apprehend, the smothered indignd I presume will not, be delivered over to South Carolina. I am not, however, pleading for the frect to reap the whirlwind. The leaders of South Carolina could not have noticed that we live in an the free States, to be surrendered because South Carolina desires it in order to extend the area of ad with pleasure the President's Message. South Carolina says she intends to leave the Union. Her and the Eastern Department, which includes South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippnd the entrance to the city of Charleston, South Carolina cannot separate herself from the Union. D It might easily be done at this time. If South Carolina should take them it might, as she anticipa[1 more...]
owers from the Convention of the people of South Carolina, under which we are authorized and empowerwith their appurtenances, in the limits of South Carolina; and also for an apportionment of the publowers from the Convention of the people of South Carolina, authorizing you to treat with the Governmring that the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of the Unrd to the property of the United States in South Carolina, that it has been purchased for a fair equDecember, four of the Representatives from South Carolina, called upon me, and requested an interviees, nor any body of the people of the State of South Carolina, will either attack or molest the Unito proceed to a hostile act on the part of South Carolina, which has not yet been alleged. Still hey to the command by the concurrence of the South Carolina authorities. But before any step could poto Fort Moultrie. Thus the authorities of South Carolina, without waiting or asking for any explana[6 more...]
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Second letter of the Commissioners to the President. (search)
eem it only necessary to say that the State of South Carolina having, in the exercise of that greatlanguage, you say: Thus the authorities of South Carolina, without waiting or asking for any explanan reference to the belief of the people of South Carolina. The language which you have quoted was a, it was impossible for the authorities of South Carolina to have known. But, without following thif the argument. Some weeks ago the State of South Carolina declared her intention, in the existiof the United States within the borders of South Carolina if an attempt was made to take it by forces from the highest official authorities of South Carolina, that no attempt would be made to disturb l and official notice from the Governor of South Carolina that we had been appointed Commissioners, u had known the acts of the authorities of South Carolina, should that have prevented your keeping yile act, on the part of the authorities of South Carolina, which is the only justification of Major [6 more...]
16.--extract from Gov. Hicks' address. I firmly believe that a division of this Government would inevitably produce civil war. The secession leaders in South Carolina, and the fanatical demagogues of the North, have alike proclaimed that such would be the result, and no man of sense, in my opinion, can question it. What couent dates as far back as 1883. Maryland and every other State in the Union, with a united voice, then declared the cause insufficient to justify the course of South Carolina. Can it be that this people, who then unanimously supported the cause of Gen. Jackson, will now yield their opinions at the bidding of modern secessionists? mplaint to justify immediate secession; and yet, against our judgments and solemn convictions of duty, we are to be precipitated into this revolution, because South Carolina thinks differently. Are we not equals? Or shall her opinions control our actions? After we have solemnly declared for ourselves, as every man must do, are
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