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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 272 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 100 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 90 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 84 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 74 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 70 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) or search for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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the remaining States would constitute the Northeast Confederacy, with its capital at Albany. It, at the first thought, will be considered strange that seven Slaveholding States and parts of Virginia and Florida should be placed (above) in a new Confederacy with Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, &c; but when the overwhelming weight of the great Northwest is taken in connection with the laws of trade, contiguity of territory, and the comparative indifference to freesoil doctrines on the part of Western Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri, it is evident that but little if any coercion, beyond moral force, would be needed to embrace them; and I have omitted the temptation of the unwasted public lands which would fall entire to this Confederacy — an appanage (well husbanded) sufficient for many generations. As to Missouri, Arkansas, and Mississippi, they would not stand out a month. Louisiana would coalesce without much solicitation, and Alabama, with West Florida, would be conquered th
ought to — but must leave the State. These words have in them decidedly the crack of the overseer's whip. The Senator evidently treats Virginia as a great negro quarter, in which the lash is the appropriate emblem of authority, and the only argument he will condescend to use. However the freemen of other parts of the State may abase themselves under the exercise of this insolent and prescriptive tyranny, should the Senator, with this scourge of slaves, endeavor to drive the people of Western Virginia from their homes, I will only say, in the language of the narrative of Gilpin's ride: “May I be there to see.” It would certainly prove a deeply interesting spectacle. It is true that before this deliverance of the popular mind of the South from the threatenings and alarm which have subdued it can be accomplished, the remorseless agitators who have made this revolution, and now hold its reins, must be discarded alike from the public confidence and the public service. The count<
Doc. 199.-Gen. McClellan's proclamation to the people of Western Virginia. Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, May 26, 1861. To the Union Men of Western Virginia: Virginians:-Western Virginia: Virginians:--The General Government has long endured the machinations of a few factious rebels in your midst. Armed traitors have in vain endeavored to deter you from expressing your loyalty at the polls; having have now shown, under the most adverse circumstances, that the great mass of the people of Western Virginia are true and loyal to that beneficent Government under which we and our fathers have lived orld that the faith and loyalty so long boasted by the Old Dominion, are still preserved in Western Virginia, and that you remain true to the Stars and Stripes. G. B. Mcclellan, Major-General Command your power, for many of them are misguided. When, under your protection, the loyal men of Western Virginia have been enabled to organize and arm, they can protect themselves, and you can then return
dministration of the laws. To those citizens of West Virginia whose large majority against Secession show a fitheir just punishment. To those citizens in Western Virginia, who claim the right of secession, in like manwn people, in so large a portion of the State as West Virginia. If it is right for one portion of the people iuld be permitted to so large a body of people as West Virginia, exercising their sovereignty in a lawful mannerpresent to recognize the wishes of the people of West Virginia, to seek their own happiness and welfare in a lahe cry, depart, depart in peace, and give not up West Virginia, which otherwise will remain in safety, if not ral and peculiar policy. With such a position as West Virginia occupies, separated by vast mountain ranges fromorth, theo whole will be a unit in our defence. West Virginia never can be coerced or conquered. Her streams his shall be so, it will be the work of those in West Virginia, who remain in arms to oppose and resist the wis
Doc. 204.-Western Virginia. The advance of Federal troops. The passage of the troops who left for Western Virginia has been one continued ovation, as far as they have gone. We went down on the train carrying the troops from Camp Carlisle, the Ohio Regiment coming soon after. Those who witnessed the parting scenes at the depot will not soon forget them. Some of them were very touching. At Benwood, one mother, who had come out to exchange the parting word with her son, said, with tears sWestern Virginia has been one continued ovation, as far as they have gone. We went down on the train carrying the troops from Camp Carlisle, the Ohio Regiment coming soon after. Those who witnessed the parting scenes at the depot will not soon forget them. Some of them were very touching. At Benwood, one mother, who had come out to exchange the parting word with her son, said, with tears standing in her eyes, as the train rolled away, Go; you leave sore hearts behind you, but all will be well when you return. And a grayhaired sire, at the same place, hobbling on a cane, shouted after the train as it moved away: I have three sons with you now, and I wish I could go myself. Such was the spirit manifested everywhere, and a corresponding feeling pervaded the hearts of the men. All the way out through Marshall the utmost enthusiasm was awakened by the appearance of the soldiers.
Doc. 222 1/2-proclamation of Col. Porterfield. The following proclamation was issued prior to the attack on Phillippa: Headquarters Virginia forces, Phillippa, Va., May 30, 1861. To the People of North-western Virginia: fellow-citizens:--I am in your section of Virginia, in obedience to the legally constitute ed authorities thereof, with the view of protecting this section of the State from invasion by foreign forces and to protect the people in the full enjoyment of their rights — civil, religious, and political. In the performance of my duties, I shall endeavor to exercise every charitable forbearance, as I have hitherto done. I shall not inquire whether any citizens of Virginia voted for or against the Ordinance of Secession. My only inquiry shall and will be as to who are the enemies of our mother — the Commonwealth of Virginia. My duty impels me now to say to all that the citizens of the Commonwealth will at all times be protected by me and those under my comman
Doc. 241.-Gen. Morris's proclamation. General Morris has issued the following proclamation, in connection with that of General McClellan: Headquarters of United States volunteers, Western Virginia, Grafton, June 8, 1861. Virginians:--In issuing the above proclamation of the commanding General, Department of Ohio, I have now the pleasure of announcing that we have routed and completely discomfited the secessionists in arms at Philippi. Their forces are demoralized, desertions are numerous, and the panic-stricken remnant has taken refuge in the passes of the mountains. Western Virginia is free from enemies to her freedom and peace. In full confidence of your ability and desire to protect yourselves, I now call upon you to come to the support of your constitutional Government. I am empowered to muster you into the service of the United States, to serve only in defence of your own soil. Arms and munitions will be furnished you. Assemble at once at your various county se
t may deny us access to Philadelphia, to New York — utterly obliterate not only our trade, but cut off our provisions. In the other case, Virginia could not do that, nor even impede our transit on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, as long as Western Virginia shall stand our friend, as assuredly it will if we are true to ourselves. The last argument popularly used in favor of the secession of Maryland, is that which asserts a necessity that compels us to go as Virginia goes. It is supposed gradually declining in numbers and losing its ascendency in the public affairs, and whose power at this day is founded rather upon the traditions of the past than upon any inherent capacity to govern? or is it to that vigorous and healthful Western Virginia, upon whom nature has lavished her bounty in the provision of all the elements of a prosperous and powerful community? Virginia is divided into two distinct sections, altogether different in physical quality and in moral character. The o
Convention that upon this question there is at least no difference of opinion between the advocates of a separation of this State. If I may be allowed, I can claim some credit for my sincerity, when I say that it has been an object for which I have labored at least since the year 1850. The Convention that met in Richmond in that year and adopted our present State Constitution, clearly disclosed, to my mind, the utter incompatibility consistent with the interests of the people of North-western Virginia of remaining in a connection with the Eastern portion of the State. And, sir, the first favorable opportunity that discovered itself to me for affecting that separation was in the Convention that met in this city in May last. And I appeal to members who are present, and who were members of that Convention, to say if I did not zealously press that measure. Why did I do it? For the reason which I then stated — for the reason that now prevents me doing it. I then stated that we were st