hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for April, 1865 AD or search for April, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

e remained in command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. It may be of interest to tell how that loss occurred. When, in the spring of 1864, General Beauregard was ordered to Virginia, to assist General Lee in the defence of Richmond, he sent to General Howell Cobb, at Macon, for safe-keeping, all his official books and papers collected since his departure from the West. After the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston's army at Greensboroa, North Carolina, in April, 1865, he telegraphed General Cobb to forward these important documents to Atlanta, through which city he knew he would have to pass on his way to Louisiana. They never reached that point. General Wilson, commanding the Federal cavalry in Georgia, took possession of them while in transitu to Atlanta, with a portion of General Beauregard's personal baggage. Immediate efforts were made to secure their restoration, but in vain: baggage and papers were sent to Washington by order, it was said,
eight to their shoulders. They were not deterred by this consideration, however, and General Johnston, in harmony with General Beauregard, at 7 A. M., on the 26th, sent a third telegram to the Secretary of War, in these terms: I am going to meet General Sherman at the same place. The meeting was held, and the following terms agreed upon by Generals Johnston and Sherman, without any difficulty whatever: Terms of a military convention entered into this twenty-sixth (26th) day of April, 1865, at Bennett's House, near Durham's Station, N. C., between Joseph E. Johnston, commanding the Confederate army, and Major-General W. T. Sherman, commanding the United States army, in North Carolina. 1. All acts of war on the part of the troops under General Johnston's command to cease from this date. 2. All arms and public property to be deposited at Greensboroa, and delivered to an ordnance officer of the United States army. Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplic
.50 June, 1863 6.50 July, 1863 9.00 August, 1863$14.00 b. par. September, 1863$14.00 October, 1863 14.00 November, 1863 15.00 December, 1863 20.00 January, 1864 21.00 February, 1864 21.00 March, 1864 23.00 April, 1864 20.00 May, 1864 19.00 June, 1864 10.00 July, 1864 21.00 August, 1864 23.00 September, 186425.00 October, 1864 26.00 November, 1864 39.00 December, 1864 49.00 January, 1865 50.00 February, 1865 56.00 March, 1865 60.00 April, 1865 100.00 The administration relied mainly on the issue of Treasury notes and call certificates, which it could not redeem, and then on the compulsory funding of these in bonds. The result of this financiering was constant embarrassment, followed by a steady decline of credit. Only $11,000,000 were due abroad when the Confederate government went down. The true resource of the country was neglected, and very little money was obtained in Europe. 4. The diplomacy of the Confederate
g General Kershaw's division, leading the advance of General Lee's army, arrived in Petersburg, and was at once ordered to extend our lines on the right. General Lee arrived, I think, at about nine o'clock He arrived at 11.30 A. M. on that day. Saturday morning. You rode with him to the front, with the view of inducing him to attack the enemy, if he found it practicable. He decided not to attack, and our men commenced putting up the intrenchments, which they so nobly defended until April, 1865. Hoping that the few data I have herein given you may be of service to you for your history of the siege of Petersburg, I remain, yours truly, Saml. Choppin, M. D., ex-Medical Inspector, C. S. A. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. clay's House, June 17th, 1864:1.45 P. M. Genl. G. T. Beauregard, Petersburg, Va.: Fifth Corps (Warren's) crossed Chickahominy at Long Bridge on the 13th; was driven from Riddel's Shop by General Hill, leaving many dead and prisoners on our hands.