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aper-hanging factory at Chelsea, England, 1720 – 1754, the designs being printed in oil by wooden blocks. He appears to have been unsuccessful in some details and in the speculation. The art was adopted and improved by a succession of persons in England and elsewhere; Skippe and Savage of the former, and Gubitz of Berlin, adding considerably to the eminence already attained. Savage ground the various pigments of the painter into inks, and imitated water-color drawing successfully. Whiting and Branston applied different colored inks to ornamental borders, and to notes, bonds, checks, etc., to prevent forgery. Vizitelly and Branston, and subsequently Baxter, attained considerable excellence. See chromo-lithography. The invention patented some years ago by Mr. Charles Knight, of London, is a process whereby fac-similes of designs in four colors are produced on the same sheet before it leaves the press, by means of a revolving carriage or bed, upon which the blocks are s
art originated with Nathan Taylor, in England, in 1754, at Knightsbridge, near London. The canvas for the purpose was originally made of ordinary width and the strips sewed together. It was afterwards woven four yards, then seven yards, and eventually nine yards wide. At the original Knightsbridge factory it is now made in pieces 8 × 20 yards and 7 × 30 yards. 2. An artificial fabric painted, varnished, or saturated with a water-proof material. The kinds are numerous; e. g.: — Whiting and ocher, mixed with glue dissolved in milk. Leather scraps treated with alkali, ground, mixed with flax or hemp fiber, and rolled into sheets. Cotton batting treated with a cement of beeswax, glue, venice turpentine, and boiled linseed oil; covered with a pigment of burgundy pitch, litharge, and boiled linseed oil, colored to suit. Wall-paper varnished. Wall-paper on canvas, sized and varnished. Painted cloth. Sheets of rubber and cork dust, softened with benzole rolled
ndiding-mill.Slate-making machine. Grinding-slip.Slicer. Grinding-wheel.Slitting-mill. Grindstone.Smoothing-mill. Grindstone. ArtificialSpade. Grindstone-dresser.Spring-polisher. Holystone.Steel. Hone.Stone-grinding machine. Lap.Stone-polishing machine. Lapidary's mill.Straggling. Lead-mill.Strickle. Lens. Grinding, etc.Tanite. Liner.Tape-carrier. Lustering.Tool-holder for grinding. Marble-polishing.Tripoli. Martin.Tumbler. Mill (varieties, see mill).Varnish. Whetstone.Whiting. Whetter.Wood-polishing machine. Grind′ing and Pol′ish-ing ma-te′ri-als. Abrasive substances used in the solid form: — Grindstone.Charcoal. Hone.Emery-cake. Oil-stone.Fish-skin. Abrasive substances used in powder; materials stated in about the order of their hardness: — Diamond.Turkey-stone dust. Sapphire.Rottenstone. Ruby.Slate. Corundum.Pumice. Emery.Chalk. Sand.Oxide of iron, colcothar. Flint.Crocus or rouge. Glass.Oxide of tin or putty-powder. Tripoli.
Aug. 8, 1871. (Reissue.)4,639JudsonNov. 21, 1871. 141,397StewartJuly 29, 1873. 155,253MorehouseSept. 22, 1874. (Reissue.)6,311EickemeyerMar. 2, 1875. 16. Sewing on Buttons. 130,581KeithAug. 20, 1872. 17. Sewing Straw-Braid. 79,856PlummerJuly 14, 1868. 94,946TurnerAug. 24, 1869. 122,555BosworthJan. 9, 1872. (Reissue.)4,840PlummerApr. 2, 1872. 131,739CarpenterOct. 1, 1872. 133,553TurnerDec. 3, 1872. 138,806BosworthJune 9, 1873. 138,807BosworthJune 9, 1873. 141,303Whiting, W. M.July 29, 1873. 145,814PalmerDec. 23, 1873. 146,970WrightJan. 27, 1874. 151,351BosworthMay 26, 1874. 152,260TurnerJune 23, 1874. 18. Sewing Knitted Goods. 59,746KilburnNov. 20, 1866. 77,611HaslamMay 5, 1868. 137,997BevanApr. 22, 1873. 19. Sewing Umbrellas. 105,862TateJuly 26, 1870. 20. Short Thread. No.Name.Date. 2,466GreenoughFeb. 21, 1842. 3,389CorlissDec. 27, 1843. 7,824RobinsonDec. 10, 1850. 9,380BradeenNov. 2, 1852. 12,247SmithJan. 16, 1855. 12,402ForbushFeb. 2
34.Cuddy et al., June 21, 1870. 105,431.Cuddy, July 19, 1870. 108,433.Bartlett, Oct. 18, 1870. 108,571.Dwelle, Oct. 25, 1870. 109,125.Hatfield, Nov. 8, 1870. 112,606.Lewis, March 14, 1871. 112,607.Lewis, March 14, 1871. 112,608.Lewis, March 14, 1871. 113,014.Brumlen, Mar. 28, 1871. 114,405.Burridge, May 2, 1871. 116,604.Lewis, July 4, 1871. 118,794.Davison, Sept. 12, 1871. 120,556.Wheeler, Oct. 31, 1871. 120,916.Wadsworth, Nov. 14, 1871. 122,404.Pollock, Jan. 3, 1872. 125,153.Whiting, April 2, 1872. 127,395.Wheeler, May 28, 1872. 136,446.Meylert, Mar. 4, 1873. 137,474.Osgood, April 1, 1873. 140,721.Milner, July 8, 1873. 142,199.Boehne, Aug. 26, 1873. 142,419.Tolle, Sept. 2, 1873. 145,713.Armstrong, Dec. 23, 1873. 148,862.Tuttle et al., Mar. 24, 1874. 151,165.Sevin, May 19, 1874. 151,497.Meylert, June 2, 1874. 151,799.Rueger, June 9, 1874. 154,643.Brumlen, Sept 1, 1874. 155,539.Morse, Sept. 29, 1874. White-lead mill. A mill for grinding whitelead, ei