hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 148 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 78 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 40 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. 38 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 34 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career.. You can also browse the collection for Horace Mann or search for Horace Mann in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

d about his feet by political intrigue, personal animosity, and possibly by popular delusion. This is the path that all heroes have trod before him. He was traduced and maligned for his supposed motives. He well knew, that, as in the Roman triumphal processions, so in public service, obloquy is an essential ingredient in the composition of all true glory.--Edmund Burke. Early in 1848, a small company of reformers, among whom were Henry Wilson, Stephen C. Phillips, John A. Andrew, and Horace Mann, used to assemble frequently in the rooms of Mr. Sumner in Court Street to discuss the encroachments of the slaveocracy, and the duties and delinquencies of the Whig party. Here indeed was taken the first real political anti-slavery stand; and here, in view of the subserviency of prominent Whigs to Southern rule, was inaugurated the intrepid Free-soil party, whose leading policy was free soil, free labor, free speech, free men, and opposition to the extension of slavery and of the slaveh