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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 30 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 24 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Essex or search for Essex in all documents.

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e Committee on Federal Relations, reported a series of resolutions, the purport of which was, to stand by the Union, and tendering to the President of the United States such aid, in men and money, as he may require. On motion of Mr. Northend, of Essex, the rules were suspended, and the resolves passed the Senate by a unanimous vote. On the same day, Mr. Parker, of Worcester, introduced in the House a new militia bill, which was referred to the committee on that subject. Jan. 19. In Senattes, in relation to the mileage of the militia. April 5. In Senate.—A resolve in favor of calling a national convention was discussed. It was opposed by Mr. Whiting, of Plymouth, and Mr. Walker, of Worcester, and advocated by Mr. Northend, of Essex, and Mr. Hardy, of Norfolk. It was finally, on motion of Mr. Davis, of Bristol, referred to the next Legislature. The session closed Thursday, April 11, 1861. The most important acts of the session, having for their object the preparation
In the Senate, on the same day, on motion of Mr. Stone, of Essex, it was voted, that a committee of seven on the part of theld of West Roxbury, and Hyde of Newton. Mr. Northend, of Essex, introduced a bill of eighteen sections, entitled a bill toembers of the Legislature free of expense. Mr. Stone, of Essex, reported a bill regulating drill companies, also in favor panies have incurred for such purposes. Mr. Northend, of Essex, reported his bill from the joint committee to provide for a bill in aid of the families of volunteers. Mr. Stone, of Essex, from the same committee, reported a bill to enable banks tad returned with the bill; when, on motion of Mr. Stone, of Essex, the vote whereby the bill was passed, was reconsidered; anesday, May 22. In the Senate.—On motion of Mr. Northend, of Essex, the bill to provide for the discipline and instruction of he so-called seceded States, was rejected. Mr. Stone, of Essex, from the Committee on the Judiciary, reported, in a new dr
service, and that each city and town shall be reimbursed from the State treasury for the money so expended. Jan. 9. In the House.—On motion of Mr. Stanwood, of Essex, the Committee on the Militia were instructed to report an amendment to the State-aid law, so as to extend its provisions to the families of Massachusetts soldiersbill to give aid to families, &c., was passed through its various stages, under a suspension of the rules. Jan. 17. In the Senate.—On motion of Mr. Northend, of Essex, the Committee on Printing were directed to consider the expediency of printing three thousand extra copies of the Adjutant-General's Report, in addition to those nate adjourned. March 1. In the Senate.—The bill concerning State aid, &c., was amended, and passed to be engrossed. March 3. In the Senate.—Mr. Northend, of Essex, announced the death of Brigadier-General Frederick W. Lander, and delivered a short but touching eulogy upon his life and character. He also introduced a joint
Old South; and men, unused to public speech, were fired with eloquence. A general camp of rendezvous was established in the city of Worcester, and named Camp Wool, in honor of the veteran, Major-General Wool. To this camp all recruits from the counties of Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, and Worcester, were sent. The old camp at Lynnfield was continued, and designated Camp Stanton, which served as the general rendezvous of recruits from the counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, Nantucket, Plymouth, and Suffolk. Until further orders, Lieutenant-Colonel Lincoln, of the Thirty-fourth Regiment, which was then being recruited, was placed in command of Camp Wool; and Colonel Maggi, of the Thirty-third Regiment, which was also being recruited, was placed in command of Camp Stanton. Surgeon-General Dale was instructed to have a surgeon at each of the camps, to examine recruits. These camps were intended for recruits who were to form new regiments;