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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 256 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 56 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 40 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Long Island City (New York, United States) or search for Long Island City (New York, United States) in all documents.

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ts, and five rounds of ammunition and four days rations, embarked on board of steamer Cambridge, at four P. M., and left for Boston about five P. M.; arrived at Long Island, Boston harbor, about daylight. July 19, disembarked at Long Island about ten A. M. Reported to the Adjutant-General of the State. Was mustered out of the serLong Island about ten A. M. Reported to the Adjutant-General of the State. Was mustered out of the service of the United States July 23, 1861. The Fourth Regiment arrived at Fortress Monroe on the morning of April 20. The adjutant of the regiment writes, At daybreak, the long low lines of the fort were visible. Anxiously the regiment watched as the boat lay off and on, until at sunrise they saw the old flag unfolding from theuly, it embarked on board the steamer S. R. Spaulding, and in fifty-six hours arrived in Boston harbor, after an absence of three months. It was mustered out at Long Island, Boston harbor, on the 22d of July. The Fifth Regiment arrived at Annapolis on the morning of the 24th of April, and landed in the afternoon. The next day,
ers, afterwards known as the Thirteenth Regiment. A camp was also formed on Long Island, in Boston Harbor, to which a number of companies, composed of men of Irish ington on the 11th of July. The Ninth, which was recruited and organized on Long Island, in Boston Harbor, left the State in the steamer Ben De Ford, on the 24th ofrecruited and organized under the superintendence of Colonel Thomas Cass, at Long Island, in Boston Harbor. The Tenth Regiment was recruited in the five western cong the two regiments agreed to enlist for three years; and both were sent to Long Island, Boston Harbor, until their organizations could be completed, and the regime by the Governor to effect this consolidation. He proceeded the same day to Long Island with the Governor's orders, which he read to the officers of the Fourteenth,ons which were passed were shown to the Adjutant-General upon his arrival at Long Island. He read them with surprise, and told Mr. Rice and the officers, that, if t
ction with this, the Secretary directed the Paymaster-General to detail an assistant to pay the men enlisted, and to be enlisted, by General Butler, a month's pay from date of muster in, which was a very proper order if it had been of general application; but it was very improper, to be applied only to General Butler's command, and denied to General Sherman's. On the 2d of October, the Secretary telegraphs to the Governor, Send three regiments for General Sherman to Hampstead Camp, on Long Island, by Monday morning at the latest, earlier if possible. On the 3d, next day, the Secretary telegraphs again to the Governor, Send the Wilson Regiment to Washington direct. Give Sherman the next one, as soon as possible. The name of General Sherman henceforth ceased to appear in the correspondence. He was assigned to another department. The command of the special expedition was given to General Burnside, and five Massachusetts regiments composed a part of it. These were the Twenty-fi
tia. It was assigned to the Department of the Gulf, and left Massachusetts Nov. 19, with orders to report to General Banks in New York. It remained in camp at Long Island until about the first day of December, when it sailed from New York for New Orleans under command of Colonel Isaac S. Burrill. The Forty-third Regiment was rmp on the twenty-ninth day of November, and proceeded to New York, under command of Colonel Marsh, with orders to report to Major-General Banks. It remained on Long Island for two or three weeks, awaiting transportation to New Orleans, where it arrived in safety in the latter part of December. The Forty-eighth Regiment was recrs elected colonel. It received marching orders on the twenty-first day of November, to report to Brigadier-General Andrews at New York. It remained in camp at Long Island several days, awaiting transportation to New Orleans. The Fiftieth Regiment was recruited and organized at Camp Edwin M. Stanton, at Boxford. The nucleus of
s. The whole number of drafted men, and substitutes for drafted men, who were sent to camp at Long Island, was 3,068. Of these, 2,720 were assigned and sent to regiments in the front, 224 were organCaptain George E. Worcester, Fort Warren, 137 men. Co. H, 8. Captain Loring S. Richardson, Long Island, 111 men. Co. I 9. 9 Captain Leonard Gordon, Long Island, 111 men. Co. K, 10. Captain CLong Island, 111 men. Co. K, 10. Captain Cephas C. Bumpas, Long Island, 112 men. Company L (11), Captain Thomas Herbert, has 147 men enlisted, 36 of whom are claimed as drafted men; and therefore he has not been able to have his company mLong Island, 112 men. Company L (11), Captain Thomas Herbert, has 147 men enlisted, 36 of whom are claimed as drafted men; and therefore he has not been able to have his company mustered in. He lacks six men to be mustered in as a minimum company, exclusive of the men claimed as drafted. The men are at Fort Independence. Company M (12), Captain J. M. Richardson, reported regate of enlisted men in camp at Long Island 127. Total number of enlisted men on duty at Long Island, 379. All of which is respectfully submitted. We have quoted the whole of this report,
ler Governor toMiss Upham complaints about soldiers at Long Island re-enlistedVeterans order of War Department returns o rendezvous for enlisted men in the Commonwealth,—one at Long Island, in Boston Harbor, under command of Brigadier-General DeThe number of men at each of these camps was as follows: Long Island, 1,086; Camp Meigs, 2,270 ; Camp Wool, 300,—total, 3,656ject, please go to the Secretary of War. At a time when Long Island Head and Deer Island Spit cannot have an earthwork nor aComplaints were made in January, that the men in camp at Long Island suffered severely from the cold, and that many of them wr was written, in command of the camp for drafted men at Long Island, Boston Harbor. The Governor transmitted General Wool'sr, N. S., for aiding soldiers to desert from the camp on Long Island, some of whom were tried, and, through witnesses obtaineWhen Brigadier-General Devens had command of the camp at Long Island, a few months ago, he brought to my attention the fact,
Governor from the beginning of the war. Through the agency of John M. Forbes and Colonel Ritchie, Massachusetts had received from England a number of heavy guns, which the Governor wished to have placed in position, with proper earthworks, on Long Island Head. On the 2d of March, the Governor wrote to John M. Forbes, who was then in Washington, inclosing him a copy of some memoranda made by Colonel Browne, of a conversation had with General Totten, in Boston, in September, 1863, which bore directly on the point of the construction of a work on Long Island Head to receive our guns. The Governor asked Mr. Forbes to consider the propriety of getting the Engineer Bureau to design an earthwork for us to erect there at our own cost, with an estimate of the necessary outlay. The Governor said,— I wish that you could get General Dyer to take our guns, and have carriages constructed for them, and mount them. The Ordnance Bureau would need no special appropriation for such carriages