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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 14, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for July 13th, 1864 AD or search for July 13th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. General Rousseau's expedition. (search)
ieved by some of the more credulous, and their flight was extreme. Those who remained even felt that they were incurring great risk, and were astonished to find that the dreaded Yankees were so different from what their imaginations had pictured them. General Rousseau's orders were stringent against depredations on private property. The following is an extract from an order issued at Ashville, and printed and distributed to the command: Headquarters cavalry forces, in the field, July 13, 1864. * * * * * * There shall be no straggling under any pretext. Private houses will not be entered by soldiers on any pretext whatever, being a prolific cause of straggling. Such entries are generally made by those who maraud and rob. Such acts are denounced as unworthy a soldier, and will be summarily punished. The Major-General, commanding, tenders his thanks to the command generally, for their good conduct and soldierly bearing, and hopes that such deportment will continue. B
Doc. 38. battles of Tupelo, Mississippi: fought July 13, 14, and 15, 1864. Lagrange, Tenn., July 22, 1864. The expedition was composed of two divisions of infantry — the First and Third of the Sixteenth Army corps. The First commanded by Brigadier-General Joseph H. Mower, the Third by Colonel Moore, of the Twenty-first Missouri, one brigade of cavalry commanded by Brigadier-General Grierson, and one brigade of colored troops, Colonel Bouton, commanding; aggregate strength about thirteen thousand. The whole commanded by Major-General A. J. Smith. The expedition left Lagrange, Tennessee, July fifth, passing south near Salem, through Ripley and New Albany to Pontotoc, where it arrived on the eleventh. At Cherry Creek, six miles north of Pontotoc, on the evening of the tenth, the advance of cavalry encountered the enemy in force of perhaps a brigade, and skirmished with them, killing a few rebels, and having one or two on our side wounded. Before this, on the eighth, the
servant, D. R. Clendenin, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding Eighth Illinois Cavalry. Samuel B. Lawrence, Lieutenant-Colonel and A. A. G. Report of Captain F. W. Alexander. Camp no. 24, Baltimore battery light artillery, Near Baltimore, July 13, 1864. Samuel B. Lawrence, A. A. G., Eighth Army Corps: sir — In pursuance of orders, I have the honor to make the following statement regarding the fight at Frederick and the battle of Monocacy. At one A. M. Thursday, seventh, I received an os killed and wounded will yet turn out as prisoners or stragglers. Alexander's battery lost three (3) men wounded, names not yet ascertained. Samuel B. Lawrence, Lieutenant-Colonel and A. A. G. Report of G. R. Johnson. Baltimore, July 13, 1864--11 o'clock A. M. General — I was in the rebel lines at Monocacy and Frederick during Saturday and Sunday last. The entire corps of Ewell and Breckinridge were there, estimated to be twenty-five or thirty thousand (25,000 or 30,000) stron