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John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Nick Anderson or search for Nick Anderson in all documents.

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been disabled during the engagement. Colonel Waters, with his brave regiment, deserves great credit for the manner in which the one commanded, and the other performed the perilous duties devolving upon them during the battles. The brave Colonel Nick Anderson, with his regiment, Sixth Ohio, performed a whole duty up to the evening of the nineteenth; he having been wounded during that day, was compelled to be relieved. The command there-after devolved on Major Erwin, who performed it highly saicers. Enlisted Men. Colonel William Grose Headquarters 1     3     1 3 4 Lieutenant-Colonel Carey Thirty-sixth Indiana Vol. Infantry 1 13 8 89   17 9 119 128 Colonel Higgins Twenty-fourth Ohio Vol. Infantry   3 3 57   16 3 76 79 Colonel Anderson Sixth Ohio Vol. Infantry 1 13 7 94 1 16 9 123 132 Colonel Waters Eighty-fourth Illinois Vol. Infantry 1 12 2 81   9 3 102 105 Lieutenant-Colonel Foy Twenty-third Kentucky Vol. Infantry 1 10 3 49   6 4 65 69 Lieutenant Russell Batt
rossing in that quarter. A detail of two hundred infantry was sent, with a section of artillery, to Jones' Bridge, with similar instructions. About this time the Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania volunteers, Colonel Hovell, was established as an outpost on the Charles City road, to cover the debouch of the crossing of the White Oak Swamp at Bracket's Ford. Infantry and cavalry pickets were established in advance of this. In this connection, I would mention that the Ninety-second New York, Colonel Anderson, was left on duty at the White Oak Swamp bridge. At this time, in consequence of the numerous detachments along the Chickahominy and White Oak Swamp, my force in hand was reduced to less than one thousand four hundred. An abatis was ordered to be cut in front, but not much progress was made, for want of tools. The day passed without disturbance, which I attributed in a great degree to the precaution I had taken of having the provost guard over every house within a distance of two or