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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
them extremely well. Captain Simpson commanded the artillery. Twenty-fifth.-Information was received of the arrival of heavy artillery from Petersburg. Troops were reported on this side of the Chowan, on the way from General Hill, under General Garnett. Twenty-seventh.--Major Stratton occupied Camden Court House, and burned a ferry boat of the enemy's. The rebels were very active at night, chopping, moving troops, and signaling. A new battery of three guns was opened by them below Norfreet, after the concentration, more than fifty thousand men. Probably forty thousand is a safe estimate; and he had associated with him such able West Pointers as Lieutenant-Generals Hill, Hood and Anderson, and Major-Generals Picket, French and Garnett, &c. The Petersburg Express of the fifteenth of April reflected the Confederate expectations in regard to Longstreet's army, in the following: Our people are buoyant and hopeful, as they ought to be. We have in that direction as gallant an
e followed soon after with the remainder of his command. The rebel force in North Carolina was estimated by General Foster as very large, and in my judgment far above the real numbers. If his estimate was correct, there must have been with Longstreet, after the concentration, more than fifty thousand men. Probably forty thousand is a safe estimate; and he had associated with him such able West Pointers as Lieutenant-Generals Hill, Hood and Anderson, and Major-Generals Picket, French and Garnett, &c. The Petersburg Express of the fifteenth of April reflected the Confederate expectations in regard to Longstreet's army, in the following: Our people are buoyant and hopeful, as they ought to be. We have in that direction as gallant an army as was ever mustered under any sun, and commanded by an officer who has won laurels in every engagement, from the first Manassas to that at Fredericksburg. Such an army, commanded by such an officer as Longstreet, may be defeated; but such an