Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pickett or search for Pickett in all documents.

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the outposts at Bachelor's Creek, with a large force of all arms, and that General Pickett would attack Little Washington on Tuesday. This information, taken in cflood will come down. They are so confident of success in the Neuse, that General Pickett will not delay for the one at Halifax. March seventh, I wrote, viz.: He states that some four hundred men were put to work on the gunboat by Pickett on his return, with instructions to complete her as soon as possible, and befocan be relied on. General Butler and Admiral Lee examined a courier of General Pickett's, and he was sent to me March eighth. He stated: Impression when informed General Wessells and himself, that the works I had constructed, since Pickett's demonstration at Newbern in February, saved that place from attack at that tderates would attempt to drive us from Eastern North Carolina. In February, Pickett attacked Batchelor's Creek, Croatan, Havelock, Newport, and other places, thre
ndition to co-operate. The one at Kinston is virtually completed, and on the first flood will come down. They are so confident of success in the Neuse, that General Pickett will not delay for the one at Halifax. March seventh, I wrote, viz.: Colonel McChesney, on the fifth, states, that all the contrabands agree that the the obstructions below Kinston are being removed. March twelfth, I wrote, viz.: He states that some four hundred men were put to work on the gunboat by Pickett on his return, with instructions to complete her as soon as possible, and before the fourteenth, the anniversary of the fall of Newbern. The boat is virtually doe ready in less than a week. I think his account of his conversation with Myers can be relied on. General Butler and Admiral Lee examined a courier of General Pickett's, and he was sent to me March eighth. He stated: Impression when he left was that Newbern would be attacked when the ram was done. General Hoke said
uld not reach half way across the river, and my scouts from Lynchburg reported the enemy concentrating at that point from the west, together with a portion of General Pickett's division from Richmond and Fitz Lee's cavalry. It was here that I fully determined to join the armies of the Lieutenant-General in front of Petersburg, insall. While at this latter place Major Young's scouts from Richmond notified me of preparations being made to prevent me from getting to the James river, and that Pickett's division of infantry was coming back from Lynchburg via the Southside railroad, as was also the cavalry, but that no advance from Richmond had yet taken place. , and General Devin was ordered to proceed to the same point. This developed the situation. The prisoners captured in front of Ashland reported Longstreet, with Pickett's and Johnson's divisions and Fitz Lee's cavalry, on the Ashland road, in the direction of Richmond, and four miles from Ashland. My course was now clear and the
ped the march toward the left of our infantry, and finally caused them to turn toward Dinwiddie, and attack us in heavy force. The enemy then again attacked at Chamberlain's creek and forced Smith's position. At this time Capeheart and Pennington's brigades of Custer's division came up and a very handsome fight occurred. The enemy have gained some ground, but we still hold in front of Dinwiddie, and Davies and Devin are coming down the Boydton road to join us. The opposing force was Pickett's division, Wise's independent brigade of infantry, and Fitzhugh Lee's, Rosser's, and W. H. Lee's cavalry commands. The men have behaved splendidly. Our loss in killed and wounded will probably number four hundred and fifty men; very few were lost as prisoners. We have of the enemy a number of prisoners. This force is too strong for us. I will hold on to Dinwiddie Court-house until I am compelled to leave. Our fighting to-day was all dismounted. P. H. Sheridan, Major-General.