hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 108 results in 18 document sections:

1 2
he fourth of May, and took up the line of march for Yazoo City, distant by the land route about seventy-five miles. The men were in excellent spirits and only too glad to exchange the march, with a fair prospect of a fight, for the irksome, monotonous duties of camp. The main objects of this movement were to draw in this direction the attention of the detached bodies of rebels in the north part of the State, and prevent a combination which would hazard our armies in Tennessee, Kentucky, or Georgia. Part of the marine brigade was to co-operate with the expedition by river, and on the arrival of our forces at Mechanicsburg on the sixth, the marine cavalry boats were found at Satartia. The former is a small town situated about four miles directly back from the latter. The command moved on, and next day encountered the enemy strongly posted near Benton. The troops were speedily brought up and placed in position, and a brief skirmish put the rebels to flight, but the nature of the c
Doc. 8. Sherman in Georgia. Tunnell Hill, Georgia, Thursday Afternoon, May 12, 1864. Genne. I have seen but one slave man in the State of Georgia. In the operations so far, General Dodises, but has the army of the Union come into Georgia to burn all rebel property, and to lay waste f wealth. We have passed through the poor North Georgia border of sandy, hilly soil, and are trencthe more fertile wheat and cotton lands of Middle Georgia. We have already passed through three couap and examines the country of this region of Georgia, he cannot but feel impressed with the masterhat Sherman, on his advance into the heart of Georgia, is strongly in earnest and determined to con, of the part taken in the battle of Resacca, Georgia: The First division of the Fifteenth army ccupied by them, Captain Corbett's battery of Georgia artillery was ordered to advance outside of o letter I omitted to mention a gallant son of Georgia. I allude to Captain Jossie, of Macon. This[4 more...]
Chattanooga — all this if he pleases. But there is an ominous drift towards Resacca. The price of his looking at Chattanooga would be Atlanta and liberty. Sherman, at last, has indicated the point where he intends to thrust, and if Dalton is not in our possession by the day after to-morrow morning, there are no warnings in history for rebel general-ship. The strength of Johnston's army is estimated by the best judges with whom I have conversed to be about fifty thousand, exclusive of Georgia militia, of whom probably fifteen thousand are bearing arms, and distributed at Rome and Resacca. Their journals estimate the strength of our army at sixty thousand. They will be astonished after they annihilate that number of Sherman's Yankees to find their work signally incomplete. General Sherman has been constantly in the saddle, and has displayed himself in front of Buzzard Roost, directing operations at points where the rebels could hardly fail to identify him. In company with Ge
ce Captain Isaac N. Dryden, of the Twenty-fourth Ohio, and his company, for daring bravery in the advance, in ascending the mountain, and driving and punishing the enemy. With light but successful skirmishing near Graysville, Ringgold, and Chickamauga Creek, and a reconnoissance from the latter to Worthen's farm, to a pass in Pigeon Mountain, I was directed, on the morning of the nineteenth instant, to make a reconnoissance below Lee and Gordon's Mills, on the Chickamauga Creek, in the State of Georgia, which I did, and found the enemy in force, and on receiving orders I withdrew the brigade, joined the column, and with it moved upon the enemy, into an open woodland to the right of the road leading towards Chattanooga. My position happened to be on a small elevation, General Cruft's brigade to my left, and General Reynolds' division on my right. We met the enemy's lines about twelve o'clock M. My brigade was formed in double lines; the Twenty-fourth Ohio Colonel Higgins, and Twenty-
thereupon left the room, and shortly returning, remarked: The landlord swears you're from Georgia. He says none but a Georgian would call for corn bread at that time of the night. On that hint we acted, and when our sooty attendant came in with the supper things, we discussed Georgia mines, Georgia banks, and Georgia mosquitoes, in a way that showed we had been bitten by all of them. Georgia banks, and Georgia mosquitoes, in a way that showed we had been bitten by all of them. In half an hour it was noised all about the hotel that the two gentlemen the Confederacy was taking such excellent care of were from Georgia. The meal ended, and a quiet smoke over, our entertaineGeorgia mosquitoes, in a way that showed we had been bitten by all of them. In half an hour it was noised all about the hotel that the two gentlemen the Confederacy was taking such excellent care of were from Georgia. The meal ended, and a quiet smoke over, our entertainers rose to go. As the Judge bade us good-night, he said to us: In the morning you had better address a note to Mr. Benjamin, asking the interview with the President. I will call at ten o'clockGeorgia. The meal ended, and a quiet smoke over, our entertainers rose to go. As the Judge bade us good-night, he said to us: In the morning you had better address a note to Mr. Benjamin, asking the interview with the President. I will call at ten o'clock, and take it to him. Very well. But will Mr. Davis see us on Sunday? Oh, that will make no difference. What we did there. The next morning, after breakfast, which we took in our room w
erform; to buoy up the hearts of our people. I know the deep disgrace felt by Georgia at our army falling back from Dalton to the interior of the State. But I was . The end must be the defeat of our enemy. It has been said that I abandoned Georgia to her fate. Shame upon such falsehood. Where could the author have been whe be wrong if he was not removed? Why, when our army was falling back from Northern Georgia, I even heard that I had sent Bragg with pontoons to cross it to Cuba. Buforgive my enemies. I have been asked to send reinforcements from Virginia to Georgia. In Virginia the disparity in numbers is just as great as it is in Georgia. Georgia. Then, I have been asked why the army sent to the Shenandoah Valley was not sent here? It was because an army of the enemy had penetrated that valley to the very gatto protect it. This the enemy denominated a raid. If so, Sherman's march into Georgia is a raid. What would prevent them now, if Early was withdrawn, from taking L
Doc. 32. letter of Alexander H. Stephens: on State sovereignty. written in reply to a communication addressed to him by his friends in Georgia, on the subject of which it treats. Crawfordsville, Ga., September 22, 1864. Gentlemen: You will please excuse me for not answering your letter of the fourteenth instant sooner. I have been absent nearly a week on a visit to my brother in Sparta, who has been quite out of health for some time. Your letter I found here on my return home yeooking to a peaceful solution of the present strife. The war on our part is fairly and entirely defensive in its character. How long it will continue to be thus wickedly and mercilessly waged against us depends upon the people of the North. Georgia, our own State, to whom we owe allegiance, has with great unanimity proclaimed the principles upon which a just and permanent peace ought to be sought and obtained. The Congress of the Confederate States has followed with an endorsement of thes
4. John A. Spooner, Esq., Agent for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Nashville, Tenn. sir: Yours from Chattanooga, July twenty-eighth, is received, notifying me of your appointment by your State as Lieutenant-Colonel and Provost-Marshal of Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi, under the act of Congress, approved July 4, 1864, to recruit volunteers to be credited to the States respectively. On applying to General Webster, at Nashville, he will grant you a pass through our lines to those Std Mobile, Alabama; and Columbus, Milledgeville, and Savannah, Georgia. I do not see that the law restricts you to black recruits, but you are at liberty to collect white recruits also. It is waste of time and money to open rendezvous in North-west Georgia, for I assure you I have not seen an ablebodied man, black or white, there, fit for a soldier, who was not in this army or the one opposed to it. You speak of the impression going abroad that I am opposed to the organization of colored r
strength, and go down into the thick woods of Georgia, where they can no longer see their foe, but em if they falter in the work. Isham's ford, Georgia, July 8, 1864. On the evening .of the sevehich have befallen this army upon the soil of Georgia. I shall endeavor to write an account of thaLee's corps — the flower of the rebel army in Georgia. The success of our grand movement is no lonMarched with the division to Catoosa Springs, Georgia (with light skirmishing), for concentration wa, on the right bank of the Oostanaula river, Georgia. At about twelve M., we came upon the enemy ng to day in front and on west of Jonesboroa, Georgia; our corps advanced east; met cavalry behind d with the enemy at the battle of Jonesboroa, Georgia. We assaulted the enemy's intrenched positioa; and that of the Ohio near Red Clay, on the Georgia line, north of Dalton. The enemy lay in anting the channels of trade and travel between Georgia and Alabama and Mississippi, which runs from [9 more...]
ssee. South of Chattanooga, a small foothold had been obtained in Georgia, sufficient to protect East Tennessee from incursions from the enely waiting for Sherman to advance far enough into the mountains of Georgia to make a retreat disastrous, to get upon his line and destroy it y wounded and worthless, and, with my effective army, move through Georgia, smashing things, to the sea. Hood may turn into Tennessee and Kenson left on the southern railroads, leading east and west, through Georgia, to effectually sever the east from the west. In other words, cutr army corps and cavalry division he designed to move with through Georgia. With the troops thus left at his disposal, there was little doube. Learning, on the thirtieth of November, that Bragg had gone to Georgia, taking with him most of the forces about Wilmington, I deemed it e greater part of the enemy's forces, now looking after Sherman in Georgia. The directions you have given for the numbers and equipment of t
1 2