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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 36 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 10 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches. You can also browse the collection for Tom Appleton or search for Tom Appleton in all documents.

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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, T. G. Appleton. (search)
ome an orator in the antislavery cause; and Tom Appleton went to Rome and took lessons in oil paintir of the occupation. It is not likely that Tom Appleton considered himself a genius, for although h was tried for it but acquitted. One day, as Appleton was going by her place of business with a fri very general attention, and some one asked Tom Appleton what he thought of it. Well, he said, I havthe same moment, another gentleman who knew Mr. Appleton entered, and said, Ah! a Palma Vecio, Mr. saw. The Italians call it Il Coconotte. Mr. Appleton had no intention of palming off doubtful paays supposed that it was one. After this Mr. Appleton branched off on to an interesting anecdote ng town, and guiltless sea, sweet rest. Tom Appleton was greatly interested in the performances ng that he had gone out, was entertained by Mr. Appleton with some remarkable stories of hypnotic anvery much interested. Deafness came upon Mr. Appleton in the last years of his life, though not s[6 more...]
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Chevalier Howe. (search)
Sumner also came; like his brother, a man much above the average in general ability, and considered quite equal to the delivery of a Fourth of July oration. He was the more entertaining talker of the two, and in other respects very much like Tom Appleton,--better known on the Paris boulevards than in his native country. Instead of being witty like Appleton he was brilliantly encyclopedic; and they both carried their statements to the verge of credibility. Doctor Howe organized the blind asAppleton he was brilliantly encyclopedic; and they both carried their statements to the verge of credibility. Doctor Howe organized the blind asylum so that it almost ran itself without his oversight, and as always happens in such cases he was idolized by those who were under his direction. There was something exceedingly kind in his tone of voice,--a voice accustomed to command and yet much subdued. His manner towards children was particularly charming and attractive. He exemplified the lines in Emerson's Wood-notes : Grave, chaste, contented though retired, And of all other men desired, applied to Doctor Howe more completely th