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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 54 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Short studies of American authors 33 3 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 30 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 19 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 14 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 8 4 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches. You can also browse the collection for Henry James or search for Henry James in all documents.

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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, The close of the War (search)
most petite damsel on the floor. Here the Spree is omnipotent, but it does not like Class Day, for then Boston and its suburbs pour forth their torrent of beauty and fashion, and Cambridge for the time being is left somewhat in the shade. Henry James in his International Episode speaks as if New York dancers were the best in the world, and they are certainly more light-footed than English men and women; but a New York lady, with whom Mr. James is well acquainted, says that Bostonians and AMr. James is well acquainted, says that Bostonians and Austrians are the finest dancers. The true Bostonian cultivates a sober reserve in his waltzing which, if not too serious, adds to the grace of his movement. Yet, when the german is over, we remember the warning of the wealthy Corinthian who refused his daughter to the son of Tisander on the ground that he was too much of a dancer and acrobat. From 1840 to 1860 Harvard University practically stagnated. The world about it progressed, but the college remained unchanged. Its presidents were
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Longfellow (search)
dyls could only have come from a great poet, but that the second and fourth are not quite equal to the others. Once, at his sister's house, he held out a book in his hand and said: Here is some of the finest dramatic poetry that I have ever read. It was Tennyson's Queen Mary; but there were many who would not have agreed with his estimate of it. Rev. Samuel Longfellow considered the statement very doubtful. In the summer of 1868 Longfellow went to Europe with his family to see what Henry James calls the best of it. Rev. Samuel Longfellow and T. G. Appleton accompanied the party, which, with the addition of Ernest Longfellow's beautiful bride, made a strong impression wherever they were seen. In fact their tour was like a triumphal procession. Longfellow was everywhere treated with the distinction of a famous poet; and his fine appearance and dignified bearing increased the reputation which had already preceded him. His meeting with Tennyson was considered as important as th
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Doctor Holmes. (search)
ight as a fencer's thrust. But Elsie Venner and Holmes's second novel, The Guardian Angel, are, to use Lowell's expression on a different subject: As full of wit, gumption and good Yankee sense, As there are mosses on an old stone fence. In the autumn of 1865 some Harvard students, radically inclined, obtained possession of a religious society in the college called the Christian Union, revolutionized it and changed its name to the Liberal Fraternity. They then invited Emerson, Henry James, Sr., Doctor Holmes, and Colonel Higginson to deliver lectures in Cambridge under their auspices. This was a pretty bold stroke, but Holmes evidently liked it. He said to the committee that waited upon him: What is your rank and file? How deep do you go down into the class? He also promised to lecture, and that he did not was more the fault of the students than his own. He was by no means a radical in religious matters, but he hated small sectarian differences-the substitution of dogma f