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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 528 2 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 261 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 199 3 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 192 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 131 1 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 122 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 106 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 103 3 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 78 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 77 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. You can also browse the collection for Jesus Christ or search for Jesus Christ in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 4 document sections:

James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
ould, pour them full to the brim of the living waters of earnest deeds. Given: a stern inflexibility of purpose, and an earnestness of nature so intense that it did not seem to exist,--as wheels that revolve with the velocity of lightning, hardly seem to the looker — on to be moving at all; adding to them an infinite faith in God, and man, and freedom, growing out of a soul of the utmost integrity, self-reliance, modesty, and almost child-like simplicity, transfused with the teachings of Jesus Christ, and inspired by the examples of the Old Testament: putting this rare creation into the walks of lowly life, at the head of a loyal and patriarchal household, and in a nation which, in its eager hunt after gold, too often extinguishes the Holy Lamp placed by the hand of Deity in the human soul; and one can readily foresee how, wherever it shall move, common men at times must stand aghast at it — smiling sometimes in derision — oftener speaking in a pity begotten of involuntary admiration <
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
ould, pour them full to the brim of the living waters of earnest deeds. Given: a stern inflexibility of purpose, and an earnestness of nature so intense that it did not seem to exist,--as wheels that revolve with the velocity of lightning, hardly seem to the looker — on to be moving at all; adding to them an infinite faith in God, and man, and freedom, growing out of a soul of the utmost integrity, self-reliance, modesty, and almost child-like simplicity, transfused with the teachings of Jesus Christ, and inspired by the examples of the Old Testament: putting this rare creation into the walks of lowly life, at the head of a loyal and patriarchal household, and in a nation which, in its eager hunt after gold, too often extinguishes the Holy Lamp placed by the hand of Deity in the human soul; and one can readily foresee how, wherever it shall move, common men at times must stand aghast at it — smiling sometimes in derision — oftener speaking in a pity begotten of involuntary admiration <
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
o all; and may God, in his infinite mercy, for Christ's sake, bless and save you all. Your affecrent classes of men — clergymen among others. Christ, the great Captain of liberty as well as of saeace of God to rule in my heart. May God, for Christ's sake, ever make his face to shine on you alld encourage each other to trust in God, and Jesus Christ, whom he hath sent. If you will keep his sI am not a stranger to the way of salvation by Christ. From my youth I have studied much on that suhere? I answer, No. There are no ministers of Christ here. These ministers who profess to be Chrisher it be right to obey God or men, judge ye. Christ told me to remember them that are in bonds, asof you may fail of the grace of God through Jesus Christ; that no one of you may be blind to the trs been consistent with the holy religion of Jesus Christ, in which I remain a most firm and humble bor as black as the one to whom Philip preached Christ. Be sure to entertain strangers, for thereby [3 more...]
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: forty days in chains. (search)
orious thoughts come to me, entertaining my mind. Presently he added, The sentence they have pronounced against me did not disturb me in the least; it is not the first time that I have looked death in the face. It is not the hardest thing for a brave man to die, I answered; but how will it be in the long days before you, shut up here? If you can be true to yourself in all this, how glad we shall be! I cannot say, he responded, but I do not believe I shall deny my Lord and Master, Jesus Christ; and I should be if I denied my principles against slavery. Why, I preach against it all the time--Captain Avis knows I do. The jailer smiled, and said, Yes. We spoke of those who, in times of trial, forgot themselves, and he said, There seems to be just that difference in people; some can bear more than others, and not suffer so much. He had been through all kinds of hardships, and did not mind them. My son remarked it was a great thing to have confidence in one's own strength. I