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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 74 4 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 60 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 12 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 5 1 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge. You can also browse the collection for Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) or search for Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 4: Longfellow (search)
river in Macedon and a river in Monmouth and there are salmons in both, so it may be said that Brunswick has somewhat the same relation to the Androscoggin that Cambridge bears to the Charles; and th,--the Muses' factories as Lowell says,--and although both the room where Longfellow lodged at Brunswick and that in which he taught have since been destroyed by fire, yet the primitive aspect can be easily restored by the imagination. In one thing Brunswick had and has the advantage over Cambridge — in possessing a tract of many acres of fine old pine woods, on whose intersecting paths it is ein her handwriting. This poetic companionship went on in a delightful house still standing in Brunswick, with its sunny windows looking out on a lawn with large pine trees, of which spot he writes (ities afterward manifested in a somewhat larger sphere. Longfellow's studies and successes at Brunswick were what secured his transplantation to Cambridge; and even his growing reputation as a poet