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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 172 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 152 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 120 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 113 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 107 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 106 6 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 102 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 89 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 68 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion. You can also browse the collection for Fremont or search for Fremont in all documents.

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l in with rebels, represented himself as the nephew of Albert Pike, a rebel general then in the western part of the Indian Territory. More than once he found himself in situations from whence escape seemed impossible; but his ready wit, before long, enabled him to find some way of evading the picket lines of the enemy: and passing through Memphis and Nashville-meeting his father at the latter place-he made his way to Portsmouth, Ohio, by midsummer of 1861; and soon after enlisted, first in Fremont's bodyguard, and subsequently in the Fourth Ohio Cavalry. After spending two months in acquiring a knowledge of cavalry drill, Corporal Pike and the rest of his company were mustered into the U. S. service at Camp Dennison, on the 20th of November, 1861; and early in the spring moved to Louisville, where they were assigned to General O. M. Mitchel's division, and soon marched toward Bowling Green. General Mitchel was too shrewd a judge of character not to discern quickly Pike's qualificati
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
and finally released, at the end of two years, to go into exile in America. Fremont drew around him a large number of such refugees from European tyranny, and foud carefully chosen men, who, as a Body-guard, served as pioneers and scouts in Fremont's advance. The exploit at Springfield was only one of many similar services for which they were designated by Fremont; but, the suspension of his command in Missouri broke up the Guard, and Zagonyi withdrew from the service until his leader , he was joined by Zagonyi, who assumed command of the expedition, by order of Fremont. Zagonyi had with him one half of his Guard, provided with only one ration. iculars of the charge are given by Major Dorsheimer in his admirable papers on Fremont's Campaign, in the Atlantic Monthly: The foe were advised of the intended aw that we are soldiers for the battle. Your watchword shall be- The Union and Fremont! Draw sabre! By the right flank-quick trot-march! Bright swords flashed i
and finally released, at the end of two years, to go into exile in America. Fremont drew around him a large number of such refugees from European tyranny, and foud carefully chosen men, who, as a Body-guard, served as pioneers and scouts in Fremont's advance. The exploit at Springfield was only one of many similar services for which they were designated by Fremont; but, the suspension of his command in Missouri broke up the Guard, and Zagonyi withdrew from the service until his leader , he was joined by Zagonyi, who assumed command of the expedition, by order of Fremont. Zagonyi had with him one half of his Guard, provided with only one ration. iculars of the charge are given by Major Dorsheimer in his admirable papers on Fremont's Campaign, in the Atlantic Monthly: The foe were advised of the intended aw that we are soldiers for the battle. Your watchword shall be- The Union and Fremont! Draw sabre! By the right flank-quick trot-march! Bright swords flashed i