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L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
ugle viz mon bugle, and so I bugle viz mon pistol and sabre. It is unnecessary to add, the brave Frenchman was not dismissed. I must not forget to mention Sergeant Hunter, of the Kentucky company. His soldierly figure never failed to attract the eye in the ranks of the Guard. He had served in the regular cavalry, and the Bodyame to the extreme right, and took position next to Zagonyi, whom he followed closely through the battle. The major seeing him, said: Why are you here, Sergeant Hunter? Your place is with your company on the left. I kind oa wanted to be in the front, was the answer. What could I say to such a man? exclaimed, Zagonyi,lity to chisel them anew, stood upon Orchard Knob. The hero of Vicksburg was there, calm, clear, persistent, far-seeing. Thomas, the sterling and steady; Meigs, Hunter, Granger, Reynolds. Clusters of humbler mortals were there, too, but it was any thing but a turbulent crowd; the voice naturally fell into a subdued tone, and ev
e of the instrument was shot away. He said: The mouth was shoot off. I could not bugle viz mon bugle, and so I bugle viz mon pistol and sabre. It is unnecessary to add, the brave Frenchman was not dismissed. I must not forget to mention Sergeant Hunter, of the Kentucky company. His soldierly figure never failed to attract the eye in the ranks of the Guard. He had served in the regular cavalry, and the Body-Guard had profited greatly from his skill as a drill master. He lost three horsesmy sabre I am sure of, because 1 felt them. At the beginning of the charge, he came to the extreme right, and took position next to Zagonyi, whom he followed closely through the battle. The major seeing him, said: Why are you here, Sergeant Hunter? Your place is with your company on the left. I kind oa wanted to be in the front, was the answer. What could I say to such a man? exclaimed, Zagonyi, speaking of the matter afterward. There was hardly a horn? or rider among the
; of the thousands who witnessed the immortal struggle; and fancy there is a parallel. I think, too, that the chair of every man of them will stand vacant against the wall to-morrow, and that around the fireside they must give thanks without him if they can. At half-past 3, a group of generals, whose names will need no Old Mortality to chisel them anew, stood upon Orchard Knob. The hero of Vicksburg was there, calm, clear, persistent, far-seeing. Thomas, the sterling and steady; Meigs, Hunter, Granger, Reynolds. Clusters of humbler mortals were there, too, but it was any thing but a turbulent crowd; the voice naturally fell into a subdued tone, and even young faces took on the gravity of later years. Generals Grant, Thomas, and Granger conferred, an order was given, and in an instant the Knob was cleared like a ship's deck for action. At twenty minutes of four, Granger stood upon the parapet; the bugle swung idle at the bugler's side, the warbling fife and the grumbling drum un