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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 309 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 157 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 150 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 139 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 125 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 100 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 96 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Leonidas Polk or search for Leonidas Polk in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 4 document sections:

William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War, Chapter 5: helps to the revival-colportage. (search)
e camps and hospitals from their centre of operations. The Virginia Episcopal Mission Committee heartily united in the work, and spent thousands of dollars per annum in sending missionaries to the army, and in printing and circulating tracts. Rev. Messrs. Gatewood and Kepler, of the Protestant Episcopal Church, were the zealous directors of operations in Virginia, while in other States such men as Bishop Elliott, of Georgia, Doctor, now Bishop, Quintard, of Tennessee, and the lamented General Polk, gave the weight of their influence and the power of their eloquence, written and oral, to promote the cause of religion among our soldiers. At Raleigh, N. C., early in the war, Rev. W. J. W. Crowder commenced the publication of tracts, encouraged and assisted by contributions from all classes of persons. In less than a year he reported: We have published, of thirty different tracts, over 5,000,000 pages, more than half of which we have given away, and the other half we have sold at a
the pure and elevated character of the officers. Wherever these are found, you invariably also find a neat, well-disciplined, orderly, quiet command, as prompt in the camp as they are brave upon the field. Now and then you may hear a taunt about our praying chaplain, or colonel, but even these thoughtless expressions come from men who venerate their officers, and would follow them to the death. Some of our ablest generals are men who have dropped the gown for the apparel of the soldier. Polk was a Bishop, Pendleton a clergyman, D. H. Hill a religious author, Jackson a dignitary of the Church, while scores of others, occupying subordinate positions, are equally well known for their devotion at the shrine of Christianity. All of these gentlemen have been eminently successful in whatever they have undertaken, have passed unharmed through the dangers by which they have been frequently environed, and are living illustrations of the truth that a fighting Christian is as terrible to hi
a call was sent from nearly every division in the army for more laborers. At the regular meeting of the chaplains in General Polk's corps the self-denying ministers, who shared the rough life of the camp with the gallant men, resolved to make up whnd transform her heroic soldiery into a sacramental host. Rev. W. T. Bennett, chaplain of the 12th Tennessee regiment, Polk's corps, wrote: Our regiment is being greatly blessed. We meet from night to night for exhortation, instruction, anted in several brigades. Chaplains still scarce. Rev. C. T. Quintard, of the Protestant Episcopal Church, chaplain for Polk's corps, and J. H. Bryson, of the Presbyterian Church, chaplain of Hardee's corps, in appealing to the public for aid in soring many wanderers to their former enjoyments and inducting about forty-five souls into the kingdom of Christ. In General Polk's brigade, Bro. Davis, of the 1st Arkansas, and Quarles, of the 45th Tennessee, have been laboring with commendable ze
of the soul but also of the body? Among the most eminent men who buckled on the sword was Bishop Polk, of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He had received a military training at West Point, and them. The group then began to disperse in different directions. General Johnston and Lieutenant-General Polk moved off a few paces together and separated — the former selecting a path lower down the hill, and General Polk proceeded along the cone of the knoll. General Johnston had scarcely parted from General Polk before a second shell from the same battery struck the latter in the chest, andGeneral Polk before a second shell from the same battery struck the latter in the chest, and he fell without a groan. Colonel Gale, of his staff, who observed his fall, ran immediately back to the spot, but before he had reached it the great soul of his loved General had sped beyond the con, Lieutenant-General Hardee, and Lieutenant-General Hood, with the compliments of Lieutenant-General Leonidas Polk-June 12th, 1864. Within the fourth volume was inscribed his own name. All were sa