Browsing named entities in John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment. You can also browse the collection for Augusta (Georgia, United States) or search for Augusta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 12: experiences in rebel prisons,--Libby, Macon. (search)
d by abusing us. On our car was a loud-mouthed fellow who was constantly insulting us. After a while he became quiet and was nearly asleep. One of the officers near touched me, and motioning to keep still, drew up his feet, straightened out, and the fellow went flying off the top of the car. Turning to me he said, Jack, didn't something drop? I said I thought so, but guessed it wasn't best to stop the train to find out, and we never learned whether he landed or not. We arrived at Augusta, Ga., on Sunday, and were marched to the park. Here citizens visited us and we had a chance to talk with them. The questions were about the same as at Petersburg. What do you uns come down to fight we uns for? etc. Talk about Yankees being anxious to trade! There was not a man, woman or child but wanted to barter with us. I sold a hat cord to a woman for twenty dollars, bought a dozen eggs for ten dollars, and invested the rest in a blackberry pie. I shall never forget that pie. The crust
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 15: the escape. (search)
had. Our friend Packard sent one of the negroes with us as guide, armed with an old-fashioned horse pistol. He was apparently very brave, would march in advance of us, and say, I'd like to see anybody take you'ns now; but hearing the least noise, would forget that he was our protector and fall back in our rear. He was the only armed guide we had on our journey, and our experience with him was such that we did not care for more. We were in doubt what to do, as Sherman, not coming to Augusta, had forced us to change our plans, but concluded we had better cross the Savannah River and try to strike him in Georgia. Our guide turned us over to another, who advised us to remain with him until the next night, which we did. After supper, in company with the negro, we started for the river. He knew all the short cuts through the swamps, also the location of creeks, and coming to one he would cross on a log, but we, not knowing in the darkness where to step next, would walk in. The
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 16: the capture and return to Columbia. (search)
night. Bright and early the next morning we were turned out and were soon on our way back to Augusta. The old negro came to see us off; as his eyes fell on Frank and me a look of sadness came ove mad way through. She was about as angry with the guards as with us. We took cars here for Augusta; the Texans said Georgians were mighty mean people, and they reckoned we had better get to AuguAugusta before we had trouble. We arrived at Augusta late in the afternoon. The people expected us and were in line on each side of the street to welcome us. Old men called us Yankee-doodles; boys callAugusta late in the afternoon. The people expected us and were in line on each side of the street to welcome us. Old men called us Yankee-doodles; boys called us Blue bellies; the women yelled all sorts of vile words. We marched up the main street into an old stock yard; an officer, dressed in the uniform of a captain of our army, stood at the gate, anungry enough to eat a raw dog. Our train was one of those southern tri-weeklies which went from Augusta to Columbia one week and tried to get back the next, and stopped at every crossroad. At one pl