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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 378 378 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 28 28 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 8 8 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for August 18th or search for August 18th in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 11 document sections:

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
ppropriated to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of five men who would enlist in the military service for three years, to fill the quota of the town. August 18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of fifty dollars to each volunteer who enlists for nine months and is credited to the town; and to pay to any man five dollars who procuNovember; at which it was voted to pay the family of Charles Goodell fifty dollars, he having volunteered in the military service of the United States. 1862. August 18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of seventy-five dollars to each volunteer who has already enlisted in the military service, and been credited to the quota of the town. It was also voted to remit the payment of poll-taxes assessed and paid by persons who have enlisted, or who shall afterwards enlist, in the military service. August 18th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money, and pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months service, and be credi
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
for sick and wounded soldiers, provided the General Government should decide to locate one in this city. Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years military service, to the credit of the city. Twenty-six thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same. The use of the spacious City Alms House, capable of accommodating three hundred sick and wounded soldiers, was offered to the General Government, which offer was respectfully declined. August 18th, The bounty to volunteers was increased to two hundred and fifty dollars; and twenty thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same. August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. Twenty-five thousand dollars were appropriated to pay said bounties. October 21st, A further appropriation of five thousand dollars was made for the Home and Coast Guard, and twenty thousand for military bounties, which on the 13th of December was inc
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
ch volunteer who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town, and a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each of those who shall enlist within thirty days. August 18th, The bounty was fixed at one hundred and fifty dollars, to be paid to any person enlisting to the credit of the town, whether citizen of the town or not, until otes into effect. 1865. April 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow, not exceeding three thousand dollars, for State aid to the families of volunteers. August 18th, Voted, to refund the sum of eighteen hundred dollars to such persons as contributed the same in aid of, and for filling the quota of, this town under the calls was fixed at one hundred dollars, and twenty thousand dollars were appropriated to pay that amount to two hundred and fifty men to fill the quota of the city. August 18th, Five hundred dollars were voted in aid of preparing the soldiers' lot in Pine-Grove Cemetery, for the burial of soldiers of Lynn who might die in the war. Augu
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
as authorized to be paid to volunteers for the nine months service. 1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, during this year, in regard to the war, although recruiting continued as before. 1864. August 18th, The selectmen having reported that fourteen men were required to fill the quota of the town, it was voted to raise seventeen hundred dollars, to pay to or for each volunteer a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 1865. January 6tney as shall in their judgment be necessary for an outfit to any persons, residents of the town, who may enlist for the support and defence of the Union, and for the comfort and support of their families during their terms of service. 1862. August 18th, Voted, to pay all those who have and shall hereafter enlist under the calls of the President one hundred dollars each, to be paid upon their being mustered into service. December—, Voted, to enter into an arrangement with other towns in this
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Absalom Gardner, C. D. Brewer, Warren Shaw. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years was G. S. Rogers. 1862. The first legal town-meeting to consider questions in relation to the war was held August 18th, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years service who enlists and is credited to the quota of the town, and to refund all moneys paid by the citizens to volunteers furnished by the town. Ale we deeply condole with the friends of the fallen, we send greeting to their living comrades in arms. Well done, brave men! your fellow-townsmen are proud of your fame, and grateful for your sacrifices. Another meeting was held on the 18th of August, when it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service when credited to the quota of Westfield, and ten thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same. 1863. There does not appear to have be
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
and be credited to the quota of the town. A paper was signed by the tax-payers to agree to have the bounty-money raised by a tax upon property. September 10th, Voted, to pay the same amount of bounty to volunteers for nine months service. 1863. April 6th, Voted, to comply with the requirements of the act to provide for the reimbursements of bounties paid to volunteers; and the town-clerk was authorized to arrange and settle the matter with the treasurer of the Commonwealth. 1864. August 18th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting for three years to the credit of the town, and to borrow twelve hundred dollars to pay the same. Several other meetings were held during the year and in the early part of 1865, at which measures were taken to recruit volunteers and to fill the quota of the town. Greenwich furnished sixty-three men for the war, which was a surplus of two men over and above all demands. Non
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
ervice to the number of forty-seven, to fill the quota of the town. On the 18th of August the bounty was increased to one hundred dollars, and on the 18th of Septembned. Lowell claims to have been the first city to have furnished its quota. August 18th, Forty thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to families of soldiers, have been passed by the town in regard to the war during this year. 1864. August 18th, Voted, to raise six thousand two hundred and fifty dollars in gold, to be ang for three years was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. On the 18th of August, it was voted to pay that amount in gold. Tyngsborough furnished sixty-fty was authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months service. 1863. August 18th, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the same as allowed t was the wish of the town to raise their quota, there was a unanimous yes! August 18th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer wh
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
days enlist for three years military service and be credited to the quota of Braintree. Four thousand seven hundred dollars were appropriated to pay the same. August 18th, Voted, to pay each resident who shall volunteer for nine months military service to fill the quota of the town a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars.s the town would adopt to raise the forty men required to fill its quota. It was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer duly mustered. August 18th, Voted, that the town assume and pay an additional bounty of one hundred dollars to such volunteers as have enlisted since August 5th, to fill the quota of forpired, the President has proved himself fully equal to the emergency, and that for the future we have the fullest confidence in his energy and wisdom. 1862. August 18th, Eight hundred dollars were appropriated to reimburse the chairman of the selectmen for money expended by him in raising the first quota of volunteers for the t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
a bounty of one hundred dollars, and limit the time of enlisting to fifteen days. A committee of one from each school-district was chosen to co-operate with the selectmen to procure enlistments. The treasurer was empowered to borrow money. August 18th, The time of enlistment was extended to the 22d of August, and the bounty raised to two hundred dollars. August 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty to each man to make out our quota, be the same more or less, and whether they are drafted or not, the b years and be credited to the quota of the town, to the number of twenty-three. A committee of one from each school district was appointed to act with the selectmen in procuring volunteers, each to be paid two dollars a day while so engaged. August 18th, The bounty was increased one hundred dollars. August 22d, The bounty to volunteers for nine months service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. It was also recommended that the recruits of West and East Bridgewater unite and form
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
s, and that the sum of three hundred thousand dollars be appropriated to pay the same; which recommendations were unanimously approved and the appropriation made. A joint-committee of the two branches was appointed to take charge of the payment of the money. On the same day the death of Colonel Cass of the Ninth Regiment was announced by the mayor; whereupon it was voted that the city council will attend the funeral from his late residence in this city on Wednesday next at ten o'clock. August 18th, it was ordered that the committee appointed July 14th to take charge of three hundred thousand dollars for bounties to volunteers be authorized to pay out of said appropriation to each of the four regiments, and to any Boston battery to be raised in this city for nine months service, such a sum as they may deem expedient for a regimental fund. A proposition to appropriate fifty thousand dollars to be disbursed for the relief of disabled soldiers enlisted from the city of Boston, who ar
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