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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 7 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 1: introductory and explanatory. (search)
ne who has had occasion to be acquainted with the records of the New-England towns knows well how to estimate those merits and those sufferinsachusetts is larger, or even so large, as was paid in the other New-England States, or in the Middle and Western States; but this we know, t was just that they should be paid. Massachusetts and the other New-England States did not have so large a proportion of young men between tee by men of foreign birth than were Massachusetts and the other New-England States. This was all fair enough and proper enough, and could nlarger proportion of old people than the newer States outside of New England. New England, and especially Massachusetts, had, moreover, a larNew England, and especially Massachusetts, had, moreover, a large number of her young and active men at sea, and engaged in the fisheries, who were exempt from military service and from draft; yet they weted to their military quotas. Not so in Massachusetts and other New-England States, where a large number entered the navy. The course pur
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
on of what was done in two of them. In Barnstable proper, the Ladies' Sanitary Association was formed, immediately after the publication of the circular of the New-England Women's Auxiliary Association was received, and continued until the close of the war. Mrs. S. B. Phinny was president, and Miss E. A. Chamberlain was secretary,re made, boxes of lint, and a large quantity of preserves, &c. The ladies were untiring in their zeal. There was also a Children's Aid Society,—a branch of the New-England Women's Auxiliary Association. It began in 1862, and continued until the close of the war, of which Miss Cordelia E. Phinny was president. 1,276 articles wereLadies' Soldiers' Relief Society continued in operation one year ten months and eight days. Their receipts were $409.74. They sent two boxes of clothing to the New-England Women's Auxiliary Association and one box to the Christian Commission. Of this society Mrs. Margaret Handy was president, and Miss Amanda Crosby secretary. We
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
by hills of no common height, is exceedingly fertile; its numerous valleys produce fine crops of grain and grasses; its mountain sides afford rich pasturage for cattle and sheep. The Connecticut River flows through its centre from north to south, and the Deerfield and Miller's Rivers pass through rich and beautiful valleys. It is a quiet, pastoral region, with here and there busy manufacturing towns. Greenfield is the shire town, and is widely known as one of the most beautiful of our New-England villages. The population of Franklin County in 1860 was 31,434, in 1865 it was 31,342, showing a decrease of 92 in the five years of the war. The population in 1870 was 32,635, which is an increase since 1865 of 1,292. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $12,448,961, in 1865 it was $13,048,120, which is an increase in five years of $599,259. The number of men which Franklin County furnished for the war, according to the returns made by the selectmen in 1866, was 3,159, which is
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
ur government, feeling willing and anxious to do something, and yet not quite clear in our minds what our duty demanded of us, a young woman of our city, one of New England's active and spirited daughters, saw and pointed out a way in which we could render service in the noble cause without entrenching on the duties of others. It elatine, 59 tea, 262 castile soap, 264 dried apple, 39 arrowroot, 25 sugar, 66 cans of jellies, and preserves of different kinds; oat meal, rice, 68 gallons old New-England rum, 10 gallons Jamaica rum, 10 bottles Jamaica rum, 64 bottles whiskey, 75 bottles brandy, 10 bottles Madeira wine, 23 bottles sherry, 20 bottles port, 32 bottnctified and ennobled by the blessed spirit which prompted its undertaking, and which kept alive to the last hour of our need the earnestness so noticeable in a New England community. From the first call to arms, which summoned away the men and boys from among us, we realized that there might be needed hospital comforts for which
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $9,726.19; in 1862, $39,143.75; in 1863, $46,370.11; in 1864, $55,000.00; in 1865, $36,000.00. Total amount, $186,240.05. The ladies of Roxbury were very active in their good works for the soldiers and their families. On the 16th of December, 1861, Miss Anna C. Lowell called a meeting of the ladies of the First Parish (Rev. Dr. Putnam's), and a society was formed to unite with the New-England Woman's Auxiliary Association of the United States Sanitary Commission. This society, of which Mrs. Henry Bartlett was the president, held weekly meetings for nearly four years. They raised the sum of $7,860.00, and forwarded to hospitals and camps through the Sanitary Commission 12,180 garments; besides books, newspapers, wines, fruits, vegetables, bed linen, and other hospital stores. Sharon Incorporated June 20, 1765. Population in 1860, 1,377; in 1865, 1,394. Valuation in 186
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
irty days, or until called into active service, and when in active service to be paid fifteen dollars a month in addition to the Government pay. To meet this expenditure the selectmen were authorized to sell thirty-seven shares of stock in the New England and Merchants' Banks, and if the State appoint an instructor to train and drill the company the town to pay any expense incurred thereby. August 29th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow whatever money may be required to give aid to the fa— Voted, That the citizens of Plymouth, in town-meeting assembled, hereby pledge themselves to purchase and encourage, so far as possible, the products of American industry, and earnestly recommend to their fellow-citizens and the women of New England,—ever zealous in every patriotic mode of sustaining the cause of their country,—the expediency and the duty of breaking the bonds of habit and fashion, and of wearing and consuming the products of American labor; that this recommendation is ma<
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
s of soldiers who have been transferred to the invalid corps the same as before. November 16, The committee on public buildings was directed to prepare forthwith the ward-rooms for recruiting purposes. Nothing more of particular interest or importance appears to have been necessary on the part of the city in regard to the war during this year. 1864. January 11th, A joint committee of which Alderman Clapp was chairman was appointed to tender to the returning companies and regiments of New-England volunteers which arrive in Boston such hospitalities as they may deem expedient and necessary. This committee discharged its duties with great fidelity. Each regiment which passed through Boston was hospitably entertained with a good meal at Faneuil Hall. It was also ordered that the board of aldermen, with such as the common council may join, be a committee upon the subject of volunteer enlistments, and to take such steps for raising the quota of Boston as they may deem expedient. M