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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,040 1,040 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 90 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 56 56 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 55 55 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 40 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 39 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865. You can also browse the collection for July 1st or search for July 1st in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 9 document sections:

Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 14: from Malvern Hill to Harrison's Landing. (search)
Private Patrick Monnehan, head, mortally. Private George H. Stevens, leg, severe. Private Daniel Teadley, leg. Co. K.Private Robert Williams, neck. Private Robert Hendley, thigh. Private William A. McKenney, breast. Private Thomas Grieve, thigh. (Missing) Private Albert S. Lillie, lost two fingers. Private Frank B. Leach, leg. killed, July 1ST, 1862—Malvern Hill. Co. E.Corporal Timothy Callahan. Co. I.Private Phillip R. Guinan. wounded and missing, according to the Monthly return for July, 1862. F. W. Tuttle. C. C. Sewall. C. B. Knox. P. Moynehan. W. Burbank. E. Powers. G. H. Stevens. F. H. Smith. J. N. Henry. D. P. Harvey. D. Teadley. Sergeant J. Hapgood. Corporal J. P. Cushing. Edwin P. Stanley (reported for duty in May, ‘63, at Falmouth, Va.) summary wounded killedwoundedmissingand missing OFFICERSMENOFFICERSMENOFFICERSMENOFFICERSMEN June 25.1733732 June 28.2 June 29.1 June 30.219373 July 1.2 Date not known.13 3286112
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 15: the rest at Harrison's Landing. (search)
urgeon Dyer who has had all the labor of his department thrown upon himself by the sickness of Surgeon Willard, and, in addition to his usual duties, has had the labor of managing the Medical department of the Brigade as Senior Surgeon. A. F. Devereux, Lieut. Col. Commanding Regt. On July 15, 1862, Colonel Hinks, then in Boston suffering from his wounds, wrote to Governor Andrew, recommending the following promotions for bravery and gallantry in the various engagements from June 25 to July 1. Capt. Ansel D. Wass, to be major, vice Howe, killed. First Lieut. Henry A. Hale, to be Captain, vice Wass, promoted. Second Lieut. Elisha A. Hinks, to be First Lieutenant, vice Hodges, resigned. Second Lieut. Samuel S. Prime, to be First Lieutenant, vice Hale, promoted. Second Lieut. Oliver F. Briggs, to be First Lieutenant, vice Lee, killed. Sergt. Maj. Edgar M. Newcomb, to be Second Lieutenant, vice Palmer, promoted. First Sergt. Frederick Crofts, Company B, to be Se
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 16: the march down the Peninsula. (search)
ng from wounds, and Major Wass had not yet returned. First Lieut. Oliver F. Briggs was the acting regimental quartermaster. Two promotions had occurred during the month of August: First Sergt. William R. Driver, of Company H being advanced to Second Lieutenant and First Sergt. Thomas Claffey, of Company G, to the same rank. The men of Company K were saddened by the information that privates Thomas Grieve, Jacob Grau, Frank Hunter and John Hogan,—reported Missing in Action—June 25 and July 1, were languishing in Libby Prison. The embarkation of the army from the Peninsula took place from three points, simultaneously,—Yorktown, Fortress Monroe and Newport News. Every conceivable thing that would float was brought into requisition,—steamers, transports, ferry boats, tugs, schooners, barges, flatboats and scows. The waters at each of these points were black with them. The ten thousand sick and wounded had first to be provided for, and this necessitated much correspondence be
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 27: the Gettysburg Campaign. (search)
he Nineteenth regiment should take possession of the place, maintain a provost guard, preserve order, and see that all the outlets were guarded. The Colonel was waited on by a committee of ladies who insisted on cooking something for the men, and, after a little argument, this was agreed to upon condition that the officers should pay something for their trouble. The night passed quietly and peacably. Orders were received by the corps, however, to start at four o'clock in the morning, July 1st, without rations, on a march of 36 miles along the Tarrytown road. During the morning was heard the low murmur of distant cannonading, and, as the line advanced, the sound grew until it deepened into the thunders of Gettysburg's first day. The regiment frequently met scattered portions of the Eleventh Corps returning,—winded—from the field, and, as usual, in such an event, there was much badinage between the men as they passed. What's all that noise about? I wonder if anyone is ge
Chapter 28: arrival at Gettysburg. July 1-2. At nine o'clock in the morning of July 1, the regiment bivouacked in the woods near Cemetery Ridge, on the ground of the famous battlefield of Gettysburg. The desperate fights at Seminary Ridge and Willoughby Run, between Gen. Reynold's, with the First Corps, and Gen. Ewell, hadJuly 1, the regiment bivouacked in the woods near Cemetery Ridge, on the ground of the famous battlefield of Gettysburg. The desperate fights at Seminary Ridge and Willoughby Run, between Gen. Reynold's, with the First Corps, and Gen. Ewell, had already taken place. Reynolds had lost his life. His First Corps had been almost annihilated after a magnificent resistance, and Howard, with the Eleventh Corps, who had come up late in the afternoon, had been driven back through Gettysburg to Cemetery Hill. Success at one moment had been with the Union forces and then with ing of the second of July, the Sixth and Fifth Corps had not yet taken up their final positions. The Fifth Corps had a march of 36 miles to make in the night of July 1st and the morning of the 2nd and that morning passed very quietly for the other Union forces. Notwithstanding Ewell's success, Lee made no effort until the balanc
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 33: the advance to Culpepper and Bealton. (search)
Co. G.First. Lieut Dudley C. Mumford, in command of company. Asst. Surg. W. D. Knapp, returned to duty Sept. 25, 1863, from hospital. Second Lieut. Charles L. Merrill, transferred to Invalid Corps, S. O. 202, Headquarters Second Corps, Aug. 30. John Y. Small, private, Co. A, promoted to Commissary Sergeant, Sept. 25, 1863, at Raccoon Ford, vice Snelling, promoted to Second Lieutenant. Private Adolph Mahnitz, Co. B, returned at Morrisville, Va., Sept. 6, from prisoner of war, captured July 1, at Taneytown, Md. Private John Doherty, Co. E., prisoner of war. On September 30, the Nineteenth regiment was withdrawn from the front and posted at Mitchell's Station on the railroad to protect the corps train. This was an excellent camping place. It was near Cedar Run, a small river, and there was an opportunity to bathe and wash clothes. Save the occasional shot of a picket, nothing disturbed the general quiet until October 11, when the regiment was ordered to fall in and begin
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 40: prison experiences. (search)
aid 50cts. for an onion and another paid $10.00 for a thin blackberry pie. I have seen men pay $2.00, $5.00 and even $7.00 for loaves of bread. Received four days rations, as we are to march to Danville. Rations consisted of twenty crackers and about a pound of ham fat. The distance to Danville is 45 miles and the reason for our march is the fact that the railroad is torn up by Yankee troops. Started just before night and before dark halted in a swampy place where we spent the night. July 1st. Marched nearly all day and camped on the bank of Stanton River. Have suffered terribly for water, it being very scarce, except at farmhouses, where the rebel guard would not allow us to stop and get a drink. July 2nd. Marched until nearly sunset. July 3rd. Marched at daylight. Rations gave out at noon. Halted toward sunset on the bank of a river and camped for the night. July 4th. Marched until along in the forenoon when we arrived in Danville, where we were put into some ol
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 44: in camp at
Bailey's Cross Roads
. Muster out. (search)
uarters Army of the Potomac, current series, and on the following morning began its return journey toward Readville, Mass. The command left Washington at 10 A. M., Baltimore at 4.45 P. M. on the same day; arrived in Philadelphia at 6 A. M. on July 1st. It is needless to say that from the Philadelphians the regiment experienced a cordial and substantial welcome at the Old Cooper Shop. Leaving Philadelphia at 2 P. M. on July 1, the men reached New York on the same night and there the regimeJuly 1, the men reached New York on the same night and there the regiment received from Colonel Howe, his associates and friends, a reception worthy of it and them. Leaving New York at 3 P. M., July 2, the regiment arrived at Readville at 9 A. M. on July 3, to await final discharge and payment. The men were allowed to leave for their homes immediately and with only the delay necessary to dispose of guns and equipments, they took advantage of the opportunity. Of the 37 commissioned officers who left Massachusetts with the regiment in 1861, only 1 returned,—Co
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
, corp., (E), July 25, ‘61; 21; died of wounds July 1, ‘62. Albin, Thomas, priv., (—), Aug. 21, ‘61y 28, ‘61; 18; transf. to V. R.C. from Co. C, July 1, ‘65; N. F.R. Boardman, Ferdinand B., priv., (riv., (E), July 25, ‘61; 32; killed in action, July 1, ‘62. Carpenter, John, priv., (G), Aug. 23, ‘ 26, ‘61; 21; wounded June 30, ‘62; 2nd Lieut. July 1, ‘62; dropped Oct. 13, 1862; is reported trans21; re-en. Jan. 30, 1864; transf. to V. R.C. July 1, ‘63; re-transf. to G. 19th; disch. June 24,B), July 26, ‘61; 19; transf. to 10th V. R.C. July 1, ‘63; disch. July 28, ‘64. Fogg, Benj. E., m. H. 2nd., priv., (C), Feb. 17, ‘62; 33; died July 1, ‘62 at Harrison's Landing, Va. Johnson, Bernag. 1, ‘61; 32; wounded Sept. 17, ‘62; deserted July 1, ‘63 at Tarrytown, N. Y. Sullivan, Patrick J.dridge; N. F.R. Tuttle, Thos. W., priv., (I), July 1, ‘61; 18; killed in action July 3, ‘63, Gettys, priv., (C), Sept. 10, ‘61; 20; disch. disa. July 1, ‘62. Wagoner, Hiram, priv., (H), Nov. 26