Browsing named entities in Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry. You can also browse the collection for Pickett or search for Pickett in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 7: the Gettysburg campaign (search)
s battle, and the event proved that the change was wisely made. The battle of Gettysburg decided the issue of the war, and ought to have ended it. The repulse of Pickett's charge was virtually the downfall of the Confederacy and insured its failure. At Gettysburg the 121st occupied an advanced position under cover of a narrow swo men wounded by stray bullets. The next day little fighting was done on the left of the line but the culmination of the battle in the charge and repulse of General Pickett was watched eagerly by the regiment as by all the unengaged part of the army; and with infinite relief they saw the charging force, shattered and torn by shotmissioned and assigned to the 121st, vice Dr. E. C. Walker resigned. General Meade has been considerably criticized for not renewing the battle on the repulse of Pickett on the ground that the Sixth Corps had come up and had not been engaged in the battle, and so might have been used to Lee's utter defeat. To any Sixth Corps ma
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 8: Meade and Lee's game of strategy (search)
ent operations. Gen. John B. Gordon of the Confederate Army says that he was sitting on his horse, not much more than a stone's throw from the river, when the charge upon the entrenchments began, and that neither General Early nor any other of the officers standing there expected the brilliant success of the charging force. Their confidence no doubt was based on the fact that the regiments in the fortifications were all veterans of many battles. The North Carolina regiments had been in Pickett's famous charge at Gettysburg, and the Louisiana troops had won the title of the Louisiana Tigers by their previous savage fighting. On the same afternoon the Third Corps, a little farther down the river, had succeeded in forcing a crossing of the river and occupied the earthworks of the enemy with the capture of 400 prisoners. The Fifth Corps, on the right of the Sixth, came up to the river in time to prevent any escape in that direction, and it is worthy of note that the division o
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 14: from Cold Harbor to Petersburg (search)
I ran up and cutting his cords said, run for the woods, but the man just sank down in his tracks, as I bounded away to my tent for shelter. That caper cost me the corporal's stripes I wore, and some extra picket duty. I sometimes think one of the fellows told who did it, but was never certain. For a number of days we were idle, but on the 29th of June we moved out to Ream's Station to help out Wilson's cavalry, who had been out on a raid, and had been cut off by Hampton, Lee, and some of Pickett's troops. We did not meet the enemy, but some of Wilson's men came to our lines, and we learned from them, that he had been badly used up and many of his men and guns captured. On the 30th we returned to our old camp on the Jerusalem plank road, from which we returned on the 2d of July to the position on the left of the 2d Corps. Our sutler, Sam Miller, came to us here and we rapidly filled up with the stock he brought, among which was some alleged Herkimer County butter and cheese, th
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 19: the capture of Petersburg by 6th Corps (search)
neral Ewell surrendered, as did also General G. W. C. Lee. General Kershaw advised such of his men as could to make their escape, and surrendered with his division. General Anderson got away with the greater part of B. R. Johnson's division and Pickett with 600 men. Generals Corse and Hunton and others of Pickett's division men were captured. About 200 of Kershaw's men got away. General Lee being informed of this disaster rode back, with a portion of Mahone's division and when he saw the cPickett's division men were captured. About 200 of Kershaw's men got away. General Lee being informed of this disaster rode back, with a portion of Mahone's division and when he saw the confusion of the retreating Confederates, he exclaimed, My God, has my army dissolved? The effort of Ewell to push his fight to an aggressive return was the fierce attack on the 37th Massachusetts, which was defeated by the flank attack of the 121st, by the right half wheel under the direction of Colonel Olcott.