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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 27: Chattanooga and the battle of Missionary Ridge (search)
his army, under the pressure we gave him, to the little town of Dalton, Ga., where he himself was soon replaced by General Joseph E. Johnstoe spring work which was expected of him. Taking his headquarters at Dalton, he faced northward and eastward. The railway line which brought hforward as the Tunnel Hill. Such was the situation of affairs at Dalton. This place, with its difficult approaches, was commonly called in to defend or more deadly in its approaches than that outer gate of Dalton, the Buzzard's Roost Gap. Meanwhile, General Thomas, who was stit he (Thomas) was in hopes that he might drive back his foe, occupy Dalton, and thus swing wide open the door of Georgia preparatory to Sherma, which was to keep Johnston busy where he was — in the vicinity of Dalton; for on Thomas's approach he immediately called for reinforcements. While the other troops were very active between Chattanooga, Dalton, and Knoxville, the wing of Thomas's army to which I belonged-probably
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 28: Atlanta campaign; battle of Dalton; Resaca begun (search)
Chapter 28: Atlanta campaign; battle of Dalton; Resaca begun Of the respective commanders of the armies which were to operate in advance of Chattanooga, namely, faced toward Chattanooga. The bulk of his force was behind, at the village of Dalton, covered by artificial works northward and eastward, and by the mountain range ic) Railroad, which passes through Tunnel Hill, Buzzard's Roost, and then on to Dalton, where it meets another branch coming from the north, through Red Clay, constiteld should make a strong demonstration directly against the enemy's position at Dalton, while he himself with the Army of the Cumberland should pass through the Snakeand Schofield constantly pressing his heavy skirmish lines from Red Clay toward Dalton, to unveil from that northern side Johnston's half-concealed intrenchments. er hand, our forces approaching Resaca through the gap on the one side and from Dalton on the other, had to work slowly and carefully to feel for the enemy's pickets
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 29: battle of Resaca and the Oostanaula (search)
ndeavored, by his reserve brigade, and by his artillery carefully posted behind his lines, through its chief, Captain Simonson, to so reinforce his left as to make up for want of any natural obstacle. Though he protected the railway and the main Dalton wagon road, yet there was a long stretch of rough ground between Stanley's left and the Oostanaula; the bend of the river was so great that an entire corps, thrust in, could hardly have filled the opening. Stanley had the same lively advance aew weary stragglers in gray coats. All this show of success gave us increased courage and hope. It should be noticed that our Colonel Wright, repairing the railways, was putting down new bridges with incredible rapidity. When we were back at Dalton his trains with bread, provender, and ammunition were already in that little town. By May 16th, early in the morning, while skirmishing was still going on with the rear guard of Johnston, across the Oostanaula, the scream of our locomotive's wh
barricade ready some half or three-quarters of a mile on. In this way they manage to check and hinder our march. We have driven them across the Etowah, and are now resting and collecting supplies for further progress. You will possibly see accounts of our operations in the newspapers. We have had to charge or turn well-constructed breastworks, and at times the fighting has been severe. General Willich and Colonel (now General) Harker in our corps were wounded. We had quite a battle at Dalton, at Resaca, then at Adairsville, and lastly here, near Cassville. A kind Providence has protected me and my staff in the midst of constant dangers. We have been fired upon by sharpshooters, small arms and artillery. Two or three have had their horses shot, and I had one bullet through my coat, but none of us have received any harm. We are preparing for a march, and if you don't get a letter you must not think it strange, for communication may be much interrupted. I long to get this