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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 388 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 347 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 217 51 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 153 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 146 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 132 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 128 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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the trend of this ridge southward and crossed Bull Run three miles distant at Mitchell's Ford. The Stone Bridge. The country in the valleys of Bull Run and its tributaries was for the most part woo in front of Miles: Observe well the roads to Bull Run and to Warrenton. ... Do not bring on an engae marching column did not get to the field of Bull Run till the afternoon of the 21st, but all came of troops: Tyler, you hold the lower fords of Bull Run and the Stone Bridge, making proper demonstraer to the ford there, turn to the left, cross Bull Run, and move down; when the next ford is reachedthat point he could see the approaches beyond Bull Run, particularly those to the Stone Bridge, and plete break-up, just before the recrossing of Bull Run, Heintzelman, with his wounded arm in a slingeenth New York from Brooklyn rallied north of Bull Run and were moving on in fine shape. See them, ssing. It was at least two weeks after our Bull Run panic before much reliance could be placed on[2 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 12: General George B. McClellan and the organization of the army of the Potomac (search)
nt may be equally well equipped in heart, plan, and purpose. The first thing to be done by McClellan, on the heels of Bull Run, was to make an army. Our Congress had authorized the call for 500,000 more volunteers. It immediately fell to McClell were made up largely from discontented regiments contributing to the disorderly mass, tenfold larger after the panic of Bull Run. McClellan instituted three remedial measures: First, an order from the War Department, which organized boards of exae, and the administration felt their quick pulsation; not so McClellan. Nobody ever saw him in haste. Not long after Bull Run the brigades were broken up and mine with the rest, so with some disappointment I returned to my regiment and was encampoduced, and then the President himself initiated it by his own orders. The division commanders whose names, thanks to Bull Run and sundry reviews, had become familiar to the army were advanced in position but not in gradeour highest grade, except
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 14: the Peninsular campaign begun; Yorktown (search)
ramping long distances in slippery, cloggy mud with the constant wetting and drying, and their clothing was much soiled and rent, so we were hoping to halt somewhere long enough to refit. At Bristow Station, a place subsequently renowned, welcome home letters found their way to our bivouac for the night. They added their cheer to the supper and the camp fire. The next day, April 3, 1862, we marched over ground already more familiar than the farms and meadows of my native town-Manassas, Bull Run, Sangster's, Fairfax, and Springfield. The excessive weight originally carried by the men was reduced to a minimum. My men did not straggle. At a rout step they smoked and chatted with each other, keeping well closed up and never relaxing their swinging, easy gait. Now and then for relief they lifted the musket from one shoulder to the other. Now and then somebody struck up a song with a chorus and all joined in the singing. It was a pleasure to see the men cross a fordable stream-fre
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 17: Second battle of Bull Bun (search)
nassas force Jackson quickly moved to a strong position several miles west of Centreville, slightly north of Groveton. He placed his men behind a railroad cut; his line faced south and stretched off eastward to our old Sudley Spring crossing of Bull Run. How easy now for A. P. Hill to dillydally about Centreville, till our.forces should rush that way via Manassas and touch his outposts, and then slip off via the upper crossings of Bull Run, and close in on Jackson in his new position. That ruBull Run, and close in on Jackson in his new position. That ruse showed Jackson's generalship. He was adroitly giving Lee and Longstreet time to get near him before battle. Phil Kearny's division, passing to the north of Manassas, soon skirmished with A. P. Hill's rear guard, while the latter was drawing off toward Sudley Springs and Jackson. Naturally, Kearny was not able to bring him to battle. King's division, of McDowell's corps, coming toward Centreville from Gainesville along the Warrenton Pike, unexpectedly encountered just at evening Confeder
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 22: battle of Chancellorsville (search)
ation of these movements was certainly wrong. Yet, wherein did we neglect any precaution? It will be found that Devens kept his subordinates constantly on the qui vive; so did Schurz. Their actions and mine were identical. The Eleventh Corps detained Jackson for over an hour; part of my force was away by Hooker's orders; part of each division fought hard, as our Confederate enemies clearly show; part of it became wild with panic, like the Belgians at Waterloo, like most of our troops at Bull Run, and the Confederates, the second day, at Fair Oaks. I may leave the whole matter to the considerate judgment of my companions in arms, simply asserting that on the terrible day of May 2, 1863, I did all which could have been done by a corps commander in the presence of that panic of men largely caused by the overwhelming attack of Jackson's 26,000 men against my isolated corps of 8,000 without its reserve-thus outnumbering me 3 to 1. There is always a theory in war which will foresta